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  • 1.
    Kilic, Ozgur
    et al.
    Academic Center for Evidence based Sports medicine (ACES), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Aoki, Haruhito
    St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Japan.
    Haagensen, Rasmus
    4Player, København, Denmark.
    Jensen, Claus
    Department of Sport Management, University College Nordjylland, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Johnson, Urban
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.
    Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.
    Academic Center for Evidence based Sports medicine (ACES), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands & Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands & Amsterdam Collaboration for Health & Safety in Sports (ACHSS), Academic Medical Center/VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Gouttebarge, Vincent
    Academic Center for Evidence based Sports medicine (ACES), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands & Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands & Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa & World Players’ Union (FIFPro), Hoofddorp, Netherlands.
    Symptoms of common mental disorders and related stressors in Danish professional football and handball2017In: European Journal of Sport Science, ISSN 1746-1391, E-ISSN 1536-7290, Vol. 17, no 10, p. 1328-1334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was twofold, namely (i) to determine the prevalence of symptoms of common mental disorders (CMDs) among current and retired professional football and handball players and (ii) to explore the relationship of psychosocial stressors with the outcome measures under study. A total of 1155 players were enrolled in an observational study based on a cross-sectional design. Questionnaires based on validated scales were set up and distributed among current and retired professional football and handball players by the Danish football and handball players’ union. In professional football, the highest prevalence (4 weeks) of symptoms of CMDs was 18% and 19% for anxiety/depression among current and retired players, respectively. In professional handball, the highest prevalence (4 weeks) of symptoms of CMDs was 26% and 16% for anxiety/depression among current and retired players, respectively. For both the current and retired professional football and handball players, a higher number of severe injuries and recent adverse life events (LE) were related to the presence of symptoms of CMD. Players exposed to severe injuries and/or recent adverse LE were 20–50% times more likely to report symptoms of CMD. The results suggest that it is possible to recognize the population of professional athletes that are more likely to develop symptoms of CMD. This could create the opportunity to intervene preventively on athletes that suffered from severe injury and/or recent adverse LE that could lead to a faster and safer recovery and psychological readiness to return to play. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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