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  • 1.
    Brooks, C.A.
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States.
    Iagnemma, Karl
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States.
    Vibration-based terrain classification for planetary exploration rovers2005In: IEEE Transactions on robotics, ISSN 1552-3098, E-ISSN 1941-0468, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1185-1191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Safe, autonomous mobility in rough terrain is an important requirement for planetary exploration rovers. Knowledge of local terrain properties is critical to ensure a rover's safety on slopes and uneven surfaces. Visual features are often used to classify terrain; however, vision can be sensitive to lighting variations and other effects. This paper presents a method to classify terrain based on vibrations induced in the rover structure by wheel-terrain interaction during driving. This sensing mode is robust to lighting variations. Vibrations are measured using an accelerometer mounted on the rover structure. The classifier is trained using labeled vibration data during an offline learning phase. Linear discriminant analysis is used for online identification of terrain classes, such as sand, gravel, or clay. This approach has been experimentally validated on a laboratory testbed and on a four-wheeled rover in outdoor conditions.

  • 2.
    Kim, Yong-Jae
    et al.
    Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin si 446-712, Republic of Korea.
    Cheng, Shanbao
    Direct Drive Systems, FMC Technologies, Fullerton, CA 92833 USA.
    Kim, Sangbae
    theMassachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.
    Iagnemma, Karl
    theMassachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.
    A Novel Layer Jamming Mechanism with Tunable Stiffness Capability for Minimally Invasive Surgery2013In: IEEE Transactions on robotics, ISSN 1552-3098, E-ISSN 1941-0468, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 1031-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel “layer jamming” mechanism that can achieve variable stiffness. The layer jamming mechanism exploits the friction present between layers of thin material, which can be controlled by a confining pressure. Due to the mechanism's hollow geometry, compact size, and light weight, it is well suited for various minimally invasive surgery applications, where stiffness change is required. This paper describes the concept, the mathematical model, and a tubular snake-like manipulator prototype. Various characteristics of layer jamming, such as stiffness and yield strength, are studied both theoretically and experimentally. © IEEE

  • 3.
    Rentschler, M. E.
    et al.
    University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, United States.
    Dumpert, J.
    Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588, United States.
    Platt, S. R.
    Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588, United States.
    Iagnemma, Karl
    Mechanical Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States.
    Oleynikov, D.
    University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, United States.
    Farritor, S. M.
    Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588, United States.
    Modeling, analysis, and experimental study of in vivo wheeled robotic mobility2006In: IEEE Transactions on robotics, ISSN 1552-3098, E-ISSN 1941-0468, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 308-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laparoscopy is abdominal surgery performed with long tools inserted through small incisions. The use of small incisions reduces patient trauma, but also eliminates the surgeon's ability to view and touch the surgical environment directly. These limitations generally restrict the application of laparoscopy to procedures less complex than those performed during open surgery. This paper presents a theoretical and experimental analysis of miniature, wheeled, in vivo robots to support laparoscopy. The objective is to develop a wireless mobile imaging robot that can be placed inside the abdominal cavity during surgery. Such robots will allow the surgeon to view the surgical environment from multiple angles. The motion of these in vivo robots will not be constrained by the insertion incisions. Simulation and experimental analyses have led to a wheel design that can attain good mobility performance in in vivo conditions.

  • 4.
    Ward, Chris C.
    et al.
    ASML Lithography Systems, Inc., Wilton, CT, USA.
    Iagnemma, Karl
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, United States.
    A dynamic-model-based wheel slip detector for mobile robots on outdoor terrain2008In: IEEE Transactions on robotics, ISSN 1552-3098, E-ISSN 1941-0468, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 821-831Article in journal (Refereed)
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