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  • 1.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Huse, Morten
    Centre for Church Research and Scandinavian Institute for Research in Entrepreneurship, Slependen, Norway.
    The venture capitalist and the board of directors in SMEs: roles and processes2002In: Venture Capital: an International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance, ISSN 1369-1066, E-ISSN 1464-5343, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 125-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper provides an attempt to direct the research in the area of venture capitalists and the board of directors in SMEs. Issues about boards in venture capital-backed technology based industrials are explored, and various research designs are used to meet different research questions. Empirical results indicate that venture capital firms purposefully use boards in the portfolio firm, and boards in venture capital-backed firms are more active than boards in other firms. The venture capitalist and the entrepreneur/owner-manager of the portfolio firm may have diverging expectations to board roles. In this setting the board becomes an interesting meeting place for studying the processes and the dynamics between external and internal stakeholders. Future research in this area should integrate board role theories and board process theories.

  • 2.
    Gabrielsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Politis, Diamanto
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Oxana, Shveykina
    Deloitte, London, UK.
    Early-stage finance and the role of external entrepreneurs in the commercialization of university-generated knowledge2012In: Venture Capital: an International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance, ISSN 1369-1066, E-ISSN 1464-5343, Vol. 14, no 2-3, p. 175-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past decade has seen a plethora of policy initiatives that seek to bridge the chasm between investments in public R&D and its effective diffusion in society. This article uses a case study approach to explore and contrast the effectiveness of different entrepreneur models in financing and developing university spin-offs (USOs). The distinction between different entrepreneur models is based on whether the USOs are championed by university employees that seek to commercialize their own inventions or by external entrepreneurs who are not the original inventors but with acquired rights to develop and commercialize technology originating from university research. Our analysis show that external entrepreneurs have a different mind-set that makes them better equipped to deal with opportunities and obstacles related to financing and developing USOs. However, the development paths of USOs are embedded in a more complex web of path-dependent interactions, where the championship of the USO becomes interwoven with existing and emerging social relationships and opportunities, and challenges related to the technology that is commercialized. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 3.
    Politis, Diamanto
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Business angels and value added: What do we know and where do we go?2008In: Venture Capital: an International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance, ISSN 1369-1066, E-ISSN 1464-5343, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 127-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business angels have been highlighted as important stakeholders for potential high-growth ventures. Extant empirical research provides evidence that they not only contribute with money but also bring added value to the ventures in which they have invested. However, despite the reported benefits of the value added provided by these investors there are very few studies that try to conceptualize this important issue. The present study seeks to meet this shortcoming by presenting a review of literature and research on business angels and value added. The overall objective is to recognize the range of value added activities that business angels have been reported to perform, aggregate the findings into a set of distinct but complementary value adding roles, and then link these roles to theoretical perspectives that explain why they have the potential to contribute to added value. Four different value added roles performed by informal investors are presented together with an explanation of how they can be seen as complementary to each other. The following discussion is then used to guide future studies of business angels and value added towards areas where our knowledge is still limited.

  • 4.
    Politis, Diamanto
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Landström, Hans
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Informal investors as entrepreneurs: The development of an entrepreneurial career2002In: Venture Capital: an International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance, ISSN 1369-1066, E-ISSN 1464-5343, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 78-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informal investors have proved to be highly valuable for the growth of the firms in which they have invested. Therefore, it is important to understand what motivates potential informal investors to make their initial investment as well as how already active investors develop their entrepreneurial careers. Such an understanding may prove helpful in directing efforts to locate and attract potential and existing informal investors. This paper investigates the entrepreneurial career of four informal investors. Based on the personal stories of these individuals, we explore their career patterns and present the central concepts of the different career phases they have progressed through. The results indicate that informal investors have experienced three overall career phases: (1) the corporate career phase; (2) the entrepreneurial learning phase; and (3) the integrated investment career phase. Each career phase provides informal investors with possibilities for learning and developing valuable competencies in order to advance in their entrepreneurial career. During the corporate career phase, the investors learn a 'managerial logic' and create a platform on which they can build up their managerial competence, establish a network, and legitimize their reputation. In the following entrepreneurial learning phase, the investors make use of this platform in varying entrepreneurial projects, mainly as consultants, which in turn provides them with the possibilities for learning the 'logic' behind entrepreneurial processes. During the integrated investment career phase, informal investors extend the platform by making use of their managerial and entrepreneurial competence in the firms in which they invest, and thus act as both entrepreneurs and informal investors in the firms in which they are involved.

  • 5.
    Winborg, Joakim
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Use of financial bootstrapping in new businesses: a question of last resort?2009In: Venture Capital: an International Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance, ISSN 1369-1066, E-ISSN 1464-5343, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 71-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines motives for using financial bootstrapping in new businesses. First, it identifies and labels groups of new business founders based on their motives for using bootstrapping. Second, it examines the relation between variables referring to the founder and the business and the motives. The data were collected in a questionnaire sent by post to 120 new business founders in Swedish business incubators. The results show that 'lower costs' is the most important motive, followed by 'lack of capital', and, surprisingly, 'fun helping others and getting help from others'. On the basis of a cluster analysis three groups of founders were identified, based on differences in their motives for using bootstrapping. The groups were labeled cost-reducing bootstrappers, capital-constrained bootstrappers and risk-reducing bootstrappers. The relative experience of the founder is the most significant influence for using bootstrapping. As experience is gained the new business founder learns more about the advantages and motives for using bootstrapping. The resource acquisition behavior changes from initially focusing on reducing costs towards a proactive focus on reducing the risk in the business.

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