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  • 1.
    Andersson, Svante
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Wikström, Niclas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Why and how are social media used in a B2B context, and which stakeholders are involved?2017In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1098-1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to explore why and how business-to-business (B2B) companies use social media and which users and stakeholders they communicate with.

    Design/methodology/approach – The study employs a case study approach because of its exploratory nature. Data from three companies consisted of interviews and observation of websites. The analysis includes within-case and cross-case displays to find patterns and themes in the data.

    Findings – The study shows that companies in a B2B contexts use social media as communication to enhance customer relationships, support sales and build their brands, in line with prior research. However, they also use social media as a recruiting tool, a seeking tool and a product information and service tool.

    Research limitations/implications – The findings confirm extant literature showing that B2B companies can directly influence content through corporate user accounts. Furthermore, firms in early stages of social media do not target any special stakeholders with broader messages, while more experienced social media users develop special messages for different stakeholders.

    Practical implications – This study contributes by shedding light on how B2B companies use social media. It also shows how different channels are effective with different stakeholders.

    Originality/value – Few studies have investigated the use of social media in a B2B context. This study goes beyond prior work by detailing how different social media tools are used, identifying different users and stakeholders, and explaining why different tools are used for different purposes targeted towards different stakeholders. New applications of the use of social media are also identified. © Emerald Publishing Limited 2017

  • 2.
    Hutchinson, David B.
    et al.
    Odette School of Business, University of Windsor, Windsor, Canada.
    Singh, Jang
    Odette School of Business, University of Windsor, Windsor, Canada.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Mysen, Tore
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Towards a Model of Conscientious Corporate Brands: a Canadian Study2013In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 687-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper attempts to validate a conceptual model for conscientious corporate brands (CCB) by exploring environmental and climate change issues together with perceptions of the internal and external effectiveness of corporate codes of ethics as dimensions of CCBs. Design/methodology/approach: By surveying organizations, the paper attempts to extend and validate previous research in ethical branding by proposing an additional empirically grounded conceptual model of "the conscientious dimension" of corporate brands. Research limitations/implications: The CCB model was tested on a sample of small-, medium- and large-sized companies in Canada, which may indicate less generalizability to larger companies or in other countries and contextual settings. Practical implications: The CCB-framework provides insights into the relationship between the natural environment, climate change and corporate codes of ethics, which organizational managers might relate to their organization. Originality/value: This empirical study extends previous research by studying the willingness among business managers to support aspects of conscientious corporate brands (CCBs) in business-to-business relationships: when considering the impact of their brands on the natural environment and climate change, and when considering their corporate codes of ethics. Such findings imply that ethical conscientiousness is not just a rider to brand value; rather, it is an integral dimension in the manufacturer-supplier relationship. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 3.
    Høgevold, Nils M.
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    A business sustainability model: a European case study2012In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: "Business sustainability" refers to the total effort of a company - including its demand and supply chain networks - to reduce the impact on the Earth's life- and eco-systems. The objective of this paper is to describe a business sustainability model based upon a case study of a European manufacturer.

    Design/methodology/approach: A case study approach was applied describing the efforts of business sustainability in the demand and supply chain networks of a Norwegian office chair producer. It is based upon a series of semi-structured in-depth interviews with top executives of the company as well as observations and content analyses of internal and external documents about the company's efforts of business sustainability.

    Findings: The case study shows that business sustainability is not about doing just one thing, but that a multitude of simultaneous efforts (e.g. actors, resources and activities) should be in place. Furthermore, business sustainability is not only about a company's own business operations, but its whole demand and supply chain networks which need to be included and taken into consideration.

    Research limitations/implications: The case study in focus is limited to just one company's effort of business sustainability and its demand and supply chain networks. It provides a business sustainability model that offers opportunities for further research.

    Practical implications: Focusing on the corporate impact of the natural environment can be highly profitable. Business sustainability and by extension the carbon footprint of demand and supply chain networks is becoming a criterion in the decision-making process of customers across industries. Business sustainability is a concern to everybody in society as the indicatives of climate change and global warming become more evident and troublesome. No one can have missed the fact that the weather is becoming more extreme, causing damage around the globe.

    Originality/value: The authors argue that research into business sustainability needs at this stage of development to be inductive rather than deductive - it may be an irreversible mistake to try to re-package existing theory into business sustainability, as climate change prediction and the poor condition of the Earth have not been fully understood or comprised in previous theory. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 4.
    Lashgari, M.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sutton-Brady, C.
    Business School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Ulfvengren, P.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adoption strategies of social media in B2B firms: a multiple case study approach2018In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 730-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to clarify business-to-business (B2B) firms’ strategies of social media marketing communication. The study aims to explore the factors contributing to the formation and adoption of integration strategies and identify who the B2B firms target. Design/methodology/approach: A multiple case study approach is used to compare four multinational corporations and their practices. Face-to-face interviews with key managers, and extensive readings and observations of the firms’ websites and social media platforms have been conducted. Findings: The study results in a model, illustrating different processes of selection, adoption and integration involved in the development of social media communication strategy for B2B firms. Major factors involved in determining the platform type, and strategies used within different phases and processes are identified. Research limitations/implications: As the chosen methodology may limit generalizability, further research is encouraged to test the model within a B2B context especially within small and medium enterprises as only large multinational corporations were investigated in this study. Practical implications: The paper provides insight into how B2B marketers can align social media with their firms’ goals through the strategic selection of platforms to reach the targeted audience and communicate their message. Originality/value: The study uncovers the benefits gained by B2B firms’ through interaction with individuals on social media. This is a significant contribution as the value of such interaction was previously undefined and acted as a barrier for adopting social media in some B2B firms. © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 5.
    Mysen, Tore
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    RELQUAL's impact on satisfaction in Norwegian business relationships2010In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 119-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a RELQUAL-construct and to test its impact on satisfaction in Norwegian business relationships.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study is based upon a survey and random sample of small and medium-sized companies in Norway. Initially, respondents were contacted by phone and a total of 581 surveys were mailed. A total of 212 surveys were returned, a response rate of 36.5 percent.

    Findings – Two principal findings are: business relationships characterized by commitment/continuity and coordination/cooperation indicate a higher degree of a company's perceived satisfaction of the supplier; and business relationships characterized by opportunism/distrust and dependence indicate a lower degree of a company's perceived satisfaction of the supplier.

    Research limitations/implications – The RELQUAL-construct and its impact on satisfaction in business relationships appears to be accurate for those Norwegian business relationships studied, but only further work in examining other companies will verify its universal applicability if it is to be seen as a valid and reliable measurement for other companies' business relationships too. Suggestions for further research are provided.

    Practical implications – This study is of managerial interest to executives since it provides a framework of dimensions to be considered in corporate efforts in maintaining satisfactory levels of relationship quality in business relationships.

    Originality/value – The RELQUAL-construct makes a contribution to theory since it proposes a higher order-construct and measurement instrument for the benefit of other researchers and practitioners in the field. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 6.
    Svensson, Göran
    School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden & School of Economics and Commercial Law, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The measurement and evaluation of mutual dependence in specific dyadic business relationships2002In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 56-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the research of dyadic business relationships is often dedicated to measuring and evaluating the dependence between actors as a unidirectional phenomenon, it is sometimes referred to as a bi‐directional issue of importance in the management of a firm’s business relationships. A unidirectional measurement and evaluation of the dependence in a specific dyadic business relationship is not always sufficient to understand the existing dependence between two actors and instead a bi‐directional approach may be required. Furthermore, there is a lack of a formalised and structured procedure in order to measure and evaluate the mutual dependence in such a relationship. Therefore, this article introduces a dependence application of the perceptual bi‐directionality‐method, i.e. the PBD‐method, in order to measure and evaluate the mutual dependence in dyadic business relationships.

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