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  • 1.
    Dos Santos, Maria A.O.
    et al.
    Department of Marketing Management, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Padin, Carmen
    Vigo University, Vigo, Spain.
    Indicators of sustainable business practices: Woolworths in South Africa2013In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 104-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    – The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how Woolworths, a South African retail chain, evaluates and controls its sustainable business practices using economic, environmental and social indicators.

    Design/methodology/approach

    – A content analysis of Woolworths' comprehensive 2008‐2011 sustainability and annual reports examined how this retail chain evaluates and implements its sustainable business practices.

    Findings

    – The results indicate that such indicators play a significant role in evaluating and implementing various Woolworths' business practices aimed at sustainability. In addition, Woolworths' comprehensive governance system ensures that its sustainable business practices are implemented and targets achieved.

    Research limitations/implications

    – The case study demonstrates that businesses can remain profitable, while at the same time protecting the natural environment and striving for sustainable business practices.

    Practical implications

    – This example demonstrates how government influence, institutional mechanisms and senior management commitment to a project ultimately has gone some way to minimise barriers to the adoption of sustainable practices.

    Originality/value

    – The example provides not only a seed of knowledge for others in retailing, but also guidance to both practice in general and theory in the field of sustainable business practices. It demonstrates how an organization has taken strategic action, extended this beyond the firm's boundaries and into the supply chain. The case study illustrates how one organization can act as the change agent in the network. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 2.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Aspects of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM): conceptual framework and empirical example2007In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 262-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    – The objective of this paper is to describe and illustrate aspects of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM).

    Design/methodology/approach

    – The terms of first‐, second‐ and n‐order supply chains are introduced. A first‐order supply chain denotes that a substantial part of it is based on the use of non‐renewable and non‐recycled resources, while the following n‐order ones (e.g. second‐order) are based on a larger share of renewable and/or recycled resources. The conceptual discussion goes across industries, but the empirical example is limited to the clothing industry.

    Findings

    – One aspect addressed is that first‐order supply chains of brand new clothing go beyond the traditional point of consumption. Another aspect raised is that second‐ and n‐order supply chains should be considered in business practices from the point of origin in the first‐order supply chains in order to enhance corporate efforts of SSCM.

    Research limitations/implications

    – The dilemma with most of the current research and literature in the field of SCM is that they overlook the connection between first‐, second‐ and n‐order supply chains. The author argues that it is not enough to simply match the supply and demand between the points of consumption and origin in first‐order supply chains in efforts of SSCM, but that an explicit extension of the boundaries towards second‐ and n‐order supply chains will be necessary in the future.

    Practical implications

    – The scarce non‐renewable resources that businesses are confronted with nowadays, and the increasing scarcity of these resources in the future, will strengthen the need to search for renewable and recycled resources from other first‐, second‐ and n‐order supply chains in order to address genuine aspects of SSCM.

    Originality/value

    – The author contends that the aspects of SSCM described and illustrated in this paper make a contribution to theory, and assist in expanding the boundaries of theory in SCM. The author also launches a quest for further conceptual descriptions and empirical illustrations to develop theoretical frameworks of SSCM.

    © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 3.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Holistic and cross-disciplinary deficiencies in the theory generation of supply chain management2003In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 303-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Generic deficiencies are identified in the theory generation of supply chain management (SCM). There is a crucial and challenging necessity to revise and extend the current theory generation of SCM. There is a need to move from atomistic theory generation towards holistic and cross-disciplinary theory generation beyond the traditional boundaries of SCM. The holistic theory generation of SCM should consider the dynamics between the point-of-origin and the point-of-final-consumption in marketing channels. Furthermore, adequate cross-disciplinary concepts and frameworks beyond the current theory generation of SCM should be considered, which so far mainly come from economics, engineering, operation management, production management, and logistics. The incorporation of generic marketing concepts and frameworks in the theory generation of SCM contribute to enhance the holistic and cross-disciplinary theory generation of SCM beyond atomistic considerations, thus eliminating some of the deficiencies of the current theory generation of SCM.

  • 4.
    Svensson, Göran
    Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden .
    Sub-Contractor and Customer Sourcing and the Occurrence of Disturbances in Firms’ Inbound and Outbound Logistics Flows2003In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 41-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research is based on a mail survey in the Swedish vehicle industry. It is concluded that the sub-contractor and customer sourcing in the firms' inbound and outbound logistics flows differ from each other. Furthermore, that there is no association between the sub-contractor and customer sourcing in the firms' inbound and outbound logistics flows. Finally, there is in part an association between the sub-contractor and customer sourcing, and the occurrence of quantitative and qualitative disturbances in firms' inbound and outbound logistics flows.

  • 5.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Teleological approaches in supply chain management: illustrations2010In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 16-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide insights and describe teleological approaches in the context of Supply Chain Management (SCM).

    Design/methodology/approach – A conceptual framework is outlined derived from complexity sciences to widen and enhance the exploration and understanding of SCM.

    Findings – Research and literature in the field of SCM have to a large extent neglected the possible underlying formative and rationalist nature of it, rather than considering or highlighting its potentially transformative nature.

    Research limitations/implications – Teleological approaches of SCM provide valuable insights in managing supply chains. They also provide innovative and challenging opportunities for further research in the field of SCM.

    Practical implications – The application of teleological approaches in supply chains may encourage and lead to managerial ideas and insights to anticipate and avoid deficient or erroneous grounds in the planning, implementation and evaluation of SCM.

    Originality/value – Teleological approaches make a contribution to the ongoing exploration and discussion of SCM, such as: incorporating a frame of reference from complexity sciences. The author believes that it also provides a timely topic in times of crisis as it compares different teleological approaches – some more dynamic and flexible than others.

  • 6.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    The Transparency of SCM-Ethics: Conceptual Framework and Empirical Illustrations2009In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 259-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The objective is to describe a conceptual framework and empirical illustrations of the transparency of SCM ethics in supply chains as a whole.

    Design/methodology/approach – The research is based on two Scandinavian-based companies in the telecom and fashion clothing industries, namely: Sony Ericsson and H&M. These two companies are of interest due to their recent involvement in ethical dilemmas and ambiguities that arose on account of their links with questionable and inappropriate corporate actions and behaviour, not by the companies themselves, but by other companies within their supply chains.

    Findings – Companies present in the worldwide marketplace and society, such as Sony Ericsson and H&M, do not always appear to be dedicated to ethical concerns and commitments within their supply chains as a whole. They tend to create some convenient restrictions in their statements and promises of corporate social responsibility (e.g. codes of ethics).

    Research limitations/implications – The transparency of SCM ethics complements recent additions to ethics in SCM. It opens up a different aspect of the theory generation that may support further research of ethical aspects in supply chains.

    Practical implications – The paper provides managerial propositions and guidelines regarding the corporate depth of ethical concerns and commitments in corporate actions and behaviour in supply chains. The framework of transparency in SCM ethics highlights those corporate actions and behaviour that may be obscured by the lack of visibility across supply chain levels. In addition, it may reveal potential weaknesses and forthcoming threats in corporate actions and behaviour in ongoing business operations.

    Originality/value – One contribution is the ethical consideration in corporate actions and behaviour across different levels in supply chains. Another is that the corporate social responsibility in terms of SCM ethics should also comprise indirect business relationships. The transparency of SCM ethics opens up challenging opportunities for further research of great value to the theory generation and best practices of SCM.

  • 7.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER). Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Bååth, Hans
    Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Supply Chain Management Ethics: Conceptual Framework and Illustration2008In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 398-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework of Supply Chain Management Ethics (SCM-ethics). Design/methodology/approach – The research is based upon a qualitative approach using a series of semi-structured interviews. Multiple perspectives and respondents have been applied in the data collection process. The study is limited to the Swedish vehicle industry. Findings – The empirical findings indicate that the corporate focus of SCM-ethics is in part narrow in the Swedish vehicle industry. The partial focus may endanger the corporate ethical performance in the long run, while the immediate one may not be affected. Research limitations/implications – The approach undertaken and thereof empirical limitations restrict the generality of findings. However, a structure of operationalisation of SCM-ethics is introduced. It is based upon four orientations and nine areas of questions, all of which serve as a fundament for further research. Practical implications – The article explores the common grounds, and provides initial insights into the complex and multifaceted field, of SCM-ethics. It may be used for teaching, training and analytical purposes. It may also be used for further managerial exploration and replication of SCM-ethics in business. Originality/value – The principal contributions are a conceptual framework based upon four distinctive orientations and a set of summarized interview series in the context of SCM-ethics, all of which may be of interest to both practitioners and scholars.

  • 8.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wagner, Beverly
    Department of Marketing, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Implementation of a Sustainable Business Cycle: The Case of a Swedish Dairy Producer2012In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 93-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to describe a corporate implementation and application of a "sustainable business cycle". Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on a single case study of a regional producer of dairy products in Sweden. The data were collected from non-structured interviews with managers and available corporate documentation. Findings: The company's "sustainable business cycle" may be divided into nine stages beginning with the arable land through to the dairy and transportation of products to market, where the final two stages involve external retailers and consumers, all of which is important to fulfilment of the earlier seven internal stages. Research limitations/implications: The findings stress the importance of connecting and reconnecting not just to immediate environmental concerns of business, but also to planet Earth, which is under non-sustainable pressure and evidently faces an unpleasant destiny. Practical implications: The case highlights advantages and challenges facing a small to medium-sized enterprise (SME) tasked with implementing a sustainable business cycle for a commodity product in a highly competitive market, dominated by powerful retailers. Social implications: Changing consumer behaviours and purchasing patterns, as well as state interventions imposed at top political levels worldwide, will gradually increase the necessity to create sustainable business cycles. Originality/value: The main contribution of this article is to present a rare detailed case study of a sustainable, organic milk supply chain. It highlights the areas where sustainability is effective. It also illustrates the challenge for an SME trying to extend the reach and to create awareness of added value to the consumer. Hopefully some lessons will be learned and emphasized in this case study. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

1 - 8 of 8
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