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  • 1.
    Mysen, Tore
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Payan, Janice M.
    School of Management and Marketing, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, Colorado, USA.
    Causes and Outcomes of Satisfaction in Business Relationships2011In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 123-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Thisstudyincludesrelationshipmarketingconcepts (i.e.trust,commitment,andsatisfaction) as precursors to transaction cost theory outcomes (i.e. specific investments, opportunism, and formalization) which are rarely, if ever, included together. Trust and commitment lead to satisfaction and satisfaction in turn leads transaction cost outcomes. The paper aims to address these issues. Design/methodology/approach – The random sample is 600 small- to medium-sized Norwegian manufacturers. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling was used to examine the responses from 212 key informants.

    Findings: The strongest positive associations are from the relationship marketing portion of the model including trust satisfaction and commitment satisfaction. The highest negative association in the model is satisfaction opportunism. Contrary to predictions, satisfaction did not have a significant association with either specific investments or formalization.

    Research limitations/implications: Both relationship marketing and transaction cost theory concepts are examined because it is likely that business success may be motivated by both theories. Limitations of the study are that it only includes small- and medium-sized companies in Norway. Second, it does not cover all business-to-business relationships (i.e. only manufacturer-supplier relationships are included). Finally, additional concepts should be included (i.e. dependence, cooperation, and control).

    Practical implications: The results suggest that managers should work developing high levels of satisfaction in business relationships to dampen the likelihood that business partners will be opportunistic. In this regard, working on a relationship serves as a safeguard against possible future risks (e.g. opportunism).

    Originality/value: This study is a seed for future research about the causes and outcomes of satisfaction in business relationships. 

    © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 2.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Ethnocentricity in top marketing journals2005In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 422-434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To draw up a demographic profile of editors, editorial boards and contributors, in the specific case of one top-ranked marketing journal, and to discuss the implications.

    Design/methodology/approach

    From a list of top-ranked titles, compiled from various sources, one was chosen as a case study. Demographic data relating to contributors and editors were collected by inspection, for a five-year period. The anonymity of the journal was preserved.

    Findings

    North American affiliations dominated among authors, editors and editorial boards. Successive editors have had an American affiliation for many years. This strongly skewed demographic profile raises a number of doubts and questions. The author suggests that one important effect is a kind of academic myopia, caused by demographic uniformity and paradigmatic inertia. He contends that this phenomenon threatens to weaken the scientific reputation of the marketing discipline and its research community.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study is restricted to a single top-ranked journal, which is anonymous because the aim is not to focus attention, negative or positive, on a single case, but rather to stimulate debate.

    Practical implications

    Tentative recommendations are offered to the publishers and editors of marketing journals for reduction of the specific and general damaging effects of demographically induced academic myopia.

    Originality/value

    This study sows the seed and provides the trigger for further research and discussion of a phenomenon with important practical implications for the academic marketing community.

  • 3.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Scholarly journal ranking(s) in marketing: single- or multi-item measures?2008In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 340-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The topic of scholarly journals is important to the marketing discipline and the worldwide research communities, due to the way the journals are categorized and judged in available and compiled journal rankings. The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss the underlying measures of journal rankings in scholarly journals in marketing. Design/methodology/approach – It is limited to the scholarly journals and journal rankings of the marketing discipline. Findings – Journal rankings of scholarly journals in marketing are mainly based upon single-item measures based upon either citations or perceptions, without any estimates of validity, reliability or generality. Research limitations/implications – There is a need to move away from the predominantly “single-item measure syndrome” that characterizes most of the available and compiled journal rankings in marketing. Practical implications – Broader approaches should be implemented and applied in journal rankings based upon “multi-item measures”. Originality/value – Re-assessment of the activity of ranking journals is long overdue if the ranking lists themselves do not consider a minimum of scientific rigor and soundness as required in other areas of scholarly endeavours. The marketing discipline may be at risk of entering a vicious and irreversible circle of decline and decomposition.

  • 4.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo school of management,Oslo,Norway.
    Mysen, T
    Oslo school of management,Oslo,Norway.
    Payan, J
    University of Northern Colorado,Greeley,Colorado,USA.
    The Key Role of Opportunism in Business Relationships2011In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 436-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study seeks to examine the key role of opportunism in business relationships relative to environment uncertainty (i.e. competitive intensity and market turbulence), bonding structure (i.e. specific assets and dependence), and relationship quality (i.e. trust and commitment). Design/methodology/approach – Initially, informants were contacted by phone and a total of 581 surveys were mailed to small- and medium-sized manufacturers asking them to answer questions about their suppliers. In total, 212 surveys were returned generating a response rate of 36.5 percent. To test the measurement properties and hypothesized relationships between the constructs in focus, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling were used.

    Findings – The results supported all six hypotheses. The principal findings are competitive intensity leads to market turbulence and market turbulence, in turn, is positively associated with opportunism; specific assets leads to dependence and dependence is, in turn, positively associated with opportunism; and supplier opportunism is negatively associated with both trust and commitment.

    Research limitations/implications – The research model tests a sample of business relationships between small- and medium-sized manufacturers and their suppliers in Norway. Findings may not be generalized to larger companies in other countries. Practical implications – The results are of interest to manufacturing executives since they provide a framework of contextual variables and relational characteristics that need to be considered in corporate efforts to control supplier opportunism.

    Originality/value – This study is unique in testing key constructs of two important theories of business marketing – transaction cost analysis and social exchange theory (i.e. relationship quality) rarely, if ever, used in the same empirical study. 

  • 5.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Mysen, Tore
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rindell, Anne
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Billström, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Validation of a META-RELQUAL construct through a Nordic comparative study2013In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 72-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to test the validity and reliability of a META-RELQUAL construct in Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish business relationships.

    Design/methodology/approach: A total of 1,500 companies were involved. The Finnish, Norwegian, and Swedish sampling frames each consisted of the 500 largest companies based upon revenue across multiple industries. The response rate was 38 percent.

    Findings: The goodness-of-fit measures of the tested measurement model of the META-RELQUAL construct were all found to be satisfactory within the recommended guidelines. The recommended guidelines for convergent, discriminant and nomological validity, as well as for construct reliability, were all well met. It is concluded that the measurement properties of the META-RELQUAL construct applied in Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish business relationships indicate acceptable validity and reliability.

    Research limitations/implications: The tested META-RELQUAL construct appears accurate for those Finnish, Norwegian, and Swedish business relationships studied, but only further testing and comparisons will verify whether it can be seen as a valid, reliable measurement for other countries and their companies' business relationships. Suggestions for further research are provided.

    Practical implications: This international study is of managerial interest to executives since it provides a framework of constructs to be considered in corporate efforts to maintain satisfactory levels of relationship quality in Finnish, Norwegian, and Swedish business relationships. It may also be applicable in other business relationships and in other countries.

    Originality/value: This Nordic comparative study of a META-RELQUAL construct contributes to theory since it outlines a higher-order construct and measurement instrument benefitting other researchers and practitioners. It appears unique in making an international comparison of a tested measurement model of the META-RELQUAL construct. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 6.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Norway.
    Slåtten, Terje
    Oslo School of Mangement, Norway.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Oslo School of Mangement, Norway.
    Helgesson, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Empirical characteristics of “top” journals in mainstream marketing2008In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 131-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim is to describe the “empirical characteristics” of the “top” journals in mainstream marketing by assessing selected journals with respect to: the proportion of “empirical” versus “non-empirical” contributions; the proportion of national versus international research data; the geographical origin of research data; and the geographical affiliations of the authors whose articles are published. Design/methodology/approach – A sample of “top” scholarly journals in mainstream marketing is selected on the basis of expert opinion and journal ranking lists. The evaluation considers all available articles at the time of data collection (a total of 1,463) published in these journals over a seven-year period from 2000 to 2006. Findings – A large proportion of all contributions in the selected journals were “empirical” in nature. Although this finding is not unexpected in scholarly journals, it is apparent that the journals evaluated also provide opportunities for non-empirical contributions. Other “empirical characteristics” were found to be skewed. Research limitations/implications – This evaluation is limited to the “empirical characteristics” of “top” journals in mainstream marketing. Practical implications – The study provides valuable insights into the nature of academic publishing in the area of top journals of mainstream marketing. Originality/value – Scholars will benefit from insights into the “empirical characteristics” of the “top” journals in mainstream marketing. In particular, scholars can note the particular features of individual journals. Further studies of the “empirical characteristics” of individual research journals are required in other sub-disciplines of marketing.

  • 7.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Australia.
    Ethnocentricity in Academic Marketing Journals: Authors, Reviewers, Editorial Boards and Editors2007In: Marketing Intelligence & Planning, ISSN 0263-4503, E-ISSN 1758-8049, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 252-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to examine and compare a set of key characteristics of ethnocentricity that influence the policy of academic marketing journals, and hence the provenance, authorship and nature of articles in academic marketing journals.

    Design/methodology/approach – The “fundamental” characteristics of three major marketing journals, published in the USA, the UK and New Zealand, were examined for the six‐year period from the start of 2000 to the end of 2006. Data were collected from editorials and web homepages. Analysis was conducted of 811 articles, 1,676 authors, three editorial teams and three sets of reviewers.

    Findings – There is a challenging academic ethnocentricity in the management and implied policy of the three journals. The extent varies, but the inescapable conclusion is that the world‐wide research community in marketing is not properly represented by leading journals.

    Research limitations/implications – The sample was intentionally small, and unrepresentative of any category except “leading quality”. The findings are intended to add momentum to a debate and point ways forward, not to provide generalisable answers.

    Practical implications – The findings suggest that: the editorial boards and reviewing teams should be made more representative geographically; editorships should be organized around the concept of a team of geographically differentiated editors; editorial and review teams should be ethnographically representative of individuals who do research and wish to publish it, particularly beyond the English‐speaking world. In general, the world‐wide research community in marketing would benefit from less ethnocentricity in academic journals, and these leading examples should strive to reduce it.

    Originality/value – The impact of ethnocentricity is underestimated in this context. The issue needs to be discussed, because of paradigmatic influences that it can have on a journal and the profile of its authors, and hence on journal ranking and perceptions of journal quality.

1 - 7 of 7
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  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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