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  • 1.
    Petzer, Daniel J.
    et al.
    Department of Marketing Management, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    De Meyer, Christine F.
    Department of Marketing Management, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Sværi, Sander
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Service Receivers’ Negative Emotions in Airline and Hospital Service Settings2012In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 484-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine service receivers' negative emotions in two different service settings, namely at an airport and in a hospital.

    Design/methodology/approach: A descriptive, convenience sampling survey method was used to collect data in South Africa consisting of a sample of 294 respondents at an airport and 288 respondents in a hospital. Data analysis included an exploratory factor analysis, and the results reported in this paper are based on the critical incident technique.

    Findings: The findings indicate both similarities and differences in service receivers' negative emotions between the two service settings. Furthermore, the results were found to be valid and reliable.

    Research limitations/implications: The results obtained pertaining to the negative emotions that service receivers experience in two service settings in South Africa may provide the foundation for further research and replication in other countries. Furthermore, the results can aid in refining and extending service providers' efforts of managing critical incidents in different service settings in airline and hospital service settings.

    Practical implications: Three main aspects of negative incidences in service encounters should be considered in strategies to manage critical incidents, namely those that are caused by: the service receiver; the service provider; or the service encounter context.

    Originality/value: This study complements and reinforces existing theory pertaining to the negative emotions service receivers' experience in negative service encounters. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 2.
    Svensson, Göran
    School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden & School of Economics and Commercial Law, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    A triadic network approach to service quality2002In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 158-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unidirectional measurement and evaluation of the service quality in a specific service encounter is not enough to understand the existing service quality between two actors in a dyadic service encounter. Furthermore, a bi‐directional approach may not always be sufficient to understand the service quality in a specific service encounter. The incorporation of a third actor may improve the understanding of service quality in dyadic service encounters. Therefore, a method is applied to analyze the dynamics of service quality in triadic business networks.

  • 3.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Sequential Service Quality in Service Encounter Chains: Case Studies2006In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The objective of the present research is to explore the construct of perceived sequential service quality in service-encounter chains. Design/methodology/approach - The study is based on a qualitative approach. Based on two case studies in the Swedish automotive and retail industries, the research applies a six-dimensional, dual-perspective construct of sequential service quality. The theoretical framework is derived from the constructs of service quality and service encounter. Findings - The case studies do not indicate any dramatic differences in perceptions of the sequential service-quality construct - despite the differences that exist between the industries. Although these industries are thus generically different, sequential service quality in service-encounter chains is recognized as being important in both industries. It is contended that the six-dimensional construct employed in the present study contributes to the exploration and conceptualization of sequential service quality in service-encounter chains both from an upstream-downstream and from a downstream-upstream perspective. Although some minor differences exist, the overall conclusion is that the construct is valid and useful in understanding and exploring these important issues. Research limitations/implications - Research and practice needs to extend well beyond single interactive constructs of service quality. The research approach introduced here - of sequential service quality in service-encounter chains - contributes to an extended research agenda. Originality/value - The approach might be fruitful in a number of areas for both researchers and practitioners that go beyond the boundaries of the currently accepted constructs and applications of service quality. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 4.
    Svensson, Göran
    School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    The quality of bi‐directional service quality in dyadic service encounters2001In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 357-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Argues that the unidirectional measurement and evaluation of service quality in any specific service encounter is not enough in itself to understand the existing service quality between two actors in a dyadic service encounter. Therefore, a method is introduced for the express purpose of analysing the perceptual bi‐directionality of service quality in order to measure and evaluate the dynamics of service quality in dyadic service encounters.

  • 5.
    Sværi, Sander
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Slåtten, Terje
    Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    An SOS-Construct of Negative Emotions in Customers’ Service Experience (CSE) and Service Recovery by Firms (SRF)2011In: Journal of Services Marketing, ISSN 0887-6045, E-ISSN 0887-6045, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 323-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to test the validity and reliability of a SOS construct and its dimensions (i.e. self, other and situational) of negative emotions in the context of consumers' service experience (CSE) and the following processes of service recovery by firms (SRF).

    Design/methodology/approach: A triangular approach was used, based on interviews and a survey in the Norwegian tourism industry. This paper reports the results from the survey consisting of 3,104 customers.

    Findings: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses have been used to examine and test the SOS construct of negative emotions in CSE and SRF. The SOS construct tested has indicated an acceptable fit, validity and reliability.

    Research limitations/implications: The SOS construct of CSE and SRF may be seen as a seed for future research in refining and extending endeavors of managing critical incidents in CSE and SRF.

    Practical implications: Strategies to manage CSE and SRF should be aimed at solving the three different SOS dimensions of negative incidents in service encounters, namely those that are caused by the customer, the company, or the situation.

    Originality/value: The SOS construct brings together, complements and fortifies existing theory and previous research in the context of negative emotions in CSE and SRF.

    © Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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