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  • 1.
    Andersson, Svante
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Suppliers' international strategies2002In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 36, no 1-2, p. 86-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A longitudinal study of the international behaviour of Swedish suppliers is presented. Three different types of supplier are identified: simple suppliers, advanced suppliers, and own product suppliers. Factors influencing the internationalisation of these suppliers are discussed. It is concluded that the firms' offer and the customers' buying strategies influence the firms' international behaviour. However, these factors do not determine the international strategies completely. Various entrepreneurs will choose various strategies. Three different types of entrepreneurs are identified: the marketing, technical, and structural entrepreneurs. The type of entrepreneur influences the firms' international strategies in different directions.

  • 2.
    Awuah, Gabriel Baffour
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Gebrekidan, Desalegn Abraha
    School of Technology and Society, University of Skövde.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    Department of Business Studies, University of Gävle.
    Interactive (networked) internationalization: The case of Swedish firms2011In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 45, no 7/8, p. 1112-1129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to provide deeper insights into the extent to which an  independent actor(s) actively collaborates with the internationalizing firm so as to jointly determine the choice of market, the mode of entry and the level of investment committed in the market to be entered and even after the entry (i.e. the ongoing activities). Design/methodology/approach – Against the previous purpose section, a qualitative research approach is selected to guide the exploratory nature of this study. Thus qualitative data are used to build the two case studies because case studies are generally a more appropriate approach when “how” and “why” questions are being posed and when the investigator has little control over events. Findings – Based on two multiple case studies, one major finding of the study shows that independent actors, with their interconnected networks, have played and are still playing a major role in influencing the internationalization processes of each of the two firms in this study. Originality/value – This is an original paper developed based on two case studies which have not been published in any journal before. The paper highlights the role of external independent actors in internationalization, which is not mentioned at all or stressed in the extant literature.

  • 3.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    SSCI and Its Impact Factors: a “prisoner's dilemma”?2010In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 44, no 1-2, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe and debate a series of concerns that may affect, influence or manipulate the "Social Science Citation Index" (SSCI) and its impact factors. Design/methodology/approach: A conceptual discussion of the SSCI and its impact factors are provided. Findings: A series of concerns and potential biases of the SSCI and its impact factors are identified. These question the reliability of the SSCI and impact factors for identifying as tools the "best" journals in the marketing field. Research limitations/implications: The SSCI and its impact factors may cause both "win-win" and "win-lose" situations in and between stakeholders of the scholarly communities of the marketing discipline worldwide. The question is raised whether there may be a situation of the "prisoner's dilemma". Practical implications: The SSCI and its impact factors are gaining terrain and acknowledgement in scholarly marketing communities worldwide. This raises the crucial question of whether or not the SSCI and its impact factors will benefit the scholarly communities of the marketing discipline worldwide in the long-term perspective. Originality/value: A principal argument brought up for further debate is how the increasing acknowledgement and applications of the SSCI and its impact factors may influence the marketing discipline and its scholarly communities worldwide as a whole. Another principal argument brought up for further debate is that the current algorithm that underpins the impact factors of the SSCI may be affected, influenced (and at worst manipulated) in the self-interest of the journal publishers, the editors and the editorial boards. Authors may also feel the pressure to match perceived expectations and potential requirements in their own self-interest. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 4.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    The paradoxnoia of top journal(s) of top in marketing2006In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 40, no 11-12, p. 1153-1168Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    The objective of this paper is to explore the dominating approaches that appear in top marketing journals.

    Design/methodology/approach:

    This research is restricted to the exploration of one top journal in marketing. The journal title is kept anonymous as the topic goes beyond the targeted journal and aspires to be of interest to the marketing discipline and its research community. A triangular approach was used, which was divided into two parts.

    Findings:

    Part one - the exploration of the editorial descriptions of selected top marketing journals shows that they tend to describe their published articles according to some key features.

    Part two - the content analysis of 151 articles generated an extremely skewed outcome. It appears to be almost a pre-requisite to have applied quantitative approaches in order to make it successfully through the blind review process and get published in the targeted journal.

    Research limitations/implications:

    This research is limited to explore one of the top marketing journals. The journal is kept anonymous as the idea is not to question or hang out a specific journal, but rather to stimulate the debate of current approaches published in the top marketing journals. Practical implications: The exploration of the top marketing journal shows a stereotype and myopic view of what is classified as "high quality" or "appropriate" research approaches. The editors and the editorial boards should let paradigmatic and dogmatic research myopia stand back in favour of broadminded and challenging research efforts. They should strive to avoid traditionalism and blinkers.

    Originality/value:

    An increased trust and acceptability of other approaches than quantitative ones in top marketing journals would be desirable. A humble request would be to give other approaches a fair chance to get into the arena of top marketing journals. The paper contends that there may be a fatal "paradoxnoia" of top journal(s) in marketing - a "paradoxnoia" of approaches that may harm and undermine the respectability of the marketing discipline and its research community. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 5.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    The spherical marketing concept: a revitalization of the marketing concept2005In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 39, no 1-2, p. 5-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    In the marketing literature it is often argued that corporations should pay attention to the needs and wants not only of their own customers, but also to those of their customers' customers. This is often referred to as "the marketing concept". The objective is to revitalize the marketing concept beyond the traditional levels of manufacturers, suppliers, wholesalers, retailers, customers and consumers in marketing channels.

    Design/methodology/approach:

    Conceptual discussion and approach are undertaken.

    Findings:

    The term "spherical marketing concept" is coined. This term connects the distinct upstream and downstream levels of marketing channels, as well as reconnecting their indistinct subsequent and preceding levels.

    Research limitations/implications:

    The dilemma with the common use of the marketing concept in the literature is that it fails to acknowledge the simultaneous connection of the components and interfaces between the upstream and downstream distinct levels from the start to the end of the marketing channels with the reconnection of the components and interfaces from the subsequent and preceding indistinct levels of the marketing channels. Further research efforts should be dedicated to bridge the start and end of distinct levels of marketing channels by way of the indistinct preceding and subsequent ones. Economic, social and ecological factors should be included.

    Practical implications:

    It is not enough simply to match the supply and demand between the start and the end of marketing channels-a revitalization of the boundaries of the marketing concept towards a total circulation approach is necessary. Best practice tends to be more and more aware and skilful in this respect.

    Originality/value:

    The spherical marketing concept contributes to pin-point the importance of the seamlessness, sustainability and total circulation of components and interfaces in marketing channels. It also contributes to place current theories and practices in perspective for the future.

  • 6.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    Deakin University, Burwood, Australia.
    Research Designs and Scientific Identity in Marketing Journals: Review and Evaluation2007In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 41, no 5/6, p. 419-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This research is based upon the assumption that the empirical research designs and the scientific identity of a journal are related. The objective is to review and evaluate the empirical research design of papers to determine the scientific identity of a selection of academic marketing journals.Design/methodology/approach – The journal sample consists of the Australasian Marketing Journal (AMJ), the European Journal of Marketing (EJM) and the Journal of Marketing (JM). The review and evaluation considers a six‐year period, namely 2000‐2005. The content analysis consisted of 811 papers.Findings – The scientific identity of JM may be seen as built upon quantitative research designs and the North American paradigm of research values. The scientific identity of AMJ is based upon a mix of empirical research designs and the Australian paradigm of research values. The scientific identity of EJM is also based upon a mix of empirical research designs, but a multi‐continental paradigm of research values.Research limitations/implications – The leading continental journals in marketing maintain a scientific identity based upon the continental paradigm of research values. If it is driven to the extremes, a paradigmatic myopia and inertia of research designs may evolve that limit the scientific identity to be dogmatic and narrow‐focused rather than variable and broad‐focused.Originality/value – A cross‐continental review and evaluation of research designs and scientific identity of academic marketing journals is presented.

  • 7.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Top versus Leading Journals in Marketing: Some Challenging Thoughts2008In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 42, no 3/4, p. 287-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The objective of this paper is to discuss some criteria in order to distinguish between top versus leading journals in marketing. The aim is to stimulate the debate of the adequacy of those issues that dominate in the top marketing journals.

    Design/methodology/approach – The authors discuss three groups of criteria, namely journal, article, and research. Each is discussed based on a set of dimensions: journal criteria – the editor, the editorial board, the editorial objective and the author affiliations; article criteria – research implication, practice implication, readability and originality; and research criteria – process, paradigm, representation, readership and contribution.

    Findings – While the top journals in marketing are named, the analysis is meant to be of a more general nature rather than to question or lambaste a specific journal.

    Research limitations/implications – There is an underlying quest for identifying and verifying the top academic journals in different research disciplines. As an extension to the discussion of top versus non-top journals, the authors raise another crucial issue, namely criteria to differentiate between top and leading journals in marketing.

    Practical implications – These criteria are based on the authors' examination of the editorial descriptions and overall contents of six top journals in marketing. The criteria are also derived from a review of the literature on academic journals and academic publishing.

    Originality/value – The discussion may stimulate and widen debate with respect to what constitutes a leading academic journal in marketing. The suggested list of criteria should be seen as a trigger for further discussion. It does not aspire to be complete, but a complement to the ongoing discussion of academic journals and academic publishing in marketing.

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