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  • 1.
    Singh, Jang
    et al.
    Odette School of Business, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Vic., Australia.
    Callaghan, Michael
    School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Vic., Australia.
    A longitudinal and cross-cultural study of the contents of codes of ethics of Australian, Canadian and Swedish corporations2011In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 103-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses a specific method to analyze the contents of the codes of ethics of the largest corporations in Australia, Canada and Sweden and compares the findings of similar content analyses in 2002 and 2006. It tracks changes in code contents across the three nations over the 2002-2006 period. There were statistically significant changes in the codes of the three countries from 2002 to 2006: the Australian and Canadian codes becoming more prescriptive, intensifying the differences between these and the Swedish codes. The contents of these codes and the nature of the changes they have undergone over time are culturally driven: Australia's and Canada's reflecting their similar cultural profiles and Sweden's reflecting its differences from these countries on organizationally relevant cultural dimensions. The study reveals that corporate codes of ethics are living documents as reflected by the significant longitudinal changes in the frequencies of mention of several of the 60 items underpinning the content analysis of the codes of ethics. Consequently, and in light of their growing prevalence and importance as instruments of corporate governance, they should not be treated as static but as dynamic documents that are subject to various environmental factors. The clear implication of the findings of this study is that for corporate codes of ethics 'one size does not fit all' and that these instruments must be carefully monitored and revised to reflect changing conditions. © 2010 The Authors.

  • 2.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Wood, Greg
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Australia.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Australia.
    A comparison between corporate and public sector business ethics in Sweden2004In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 13, no 2-3, p. 166-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines and reports upon the results of a study conducted in 2002 of the top 100 corporate sector organizations and the top 100 public sector organizations in Sweden. The aim of the study was to examine, via a self-administered mail questionnaire, the commitment to business ethics of these top 200 Swedish organizations. This research reports on the responses of those organizations that possessed a code of ethics. It would appear that in corporate Sweden business ethics has only recently become a topic of interest and that many organizations are in the early stages of code development and assimilation into organization policies. In the Swedish public sector, organizations are less developed in their business ethics artifacts causing them to appear to be lagging behind the corporate sector. This disparity between the two sectors in Sweden currently, and each sector's intended future implementation of codes of ethics, could mean that these two sectors of business may become highly divergent in their acceptance of business ethics practices as a norm.

  • 3.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Burwood, Vic., Australia.
    Callaghan, Michael
    School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Burwood, Vic., Australia.
    A comparison of business ethics commitment in private and public sector organizations in Sweden2010In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 213-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the results of a study of the top 500 private sector organizations and the top 100 public sector organizations in Sweden. It is a replication of the study by Svensson et al. (2004). The aim of the study was to describe and compare the business ethics commitment of organizations across the two sectors. The empirical findings indicate that the processes involved in business ethics commitment have begun to be recognized and acted upon at an organizational level in Sweden. Some support is provided to show that codes of ethics are developing in some of Sweden's largest private and public sector organizations – although this is happening to a lesser extent in the public sector. It is noted that an effect of a code of ethics on the bottom line of the business was acknowledged by respondents in both private and public sector organizations. We believe that the supporting measures of business ethics commitment appear to be underutilized in both private and public sector organizations in Sweden (among those that possess codes of ethics), thus indicating that the commitment to business ethics in Swedish organizations has potential for future development.

  • 4.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Singh, Jang
    University of Windsor, Windsor, Canada.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Implementation, communication and benefits of corporate codes of ethics: an international and longitudinal approach for Australia, Canada and Sweden2009In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 389-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the implementation, communication and benefits of corporate codes of ethics by the top companies operating in Australia, Canada and Sweden. It provides an international comparison across three continents. It is also based on a longitudinal approach where three national surveys were performed in 2001–2002 and replications of the same surveys were performed in 2005–2006. The empirical findings of this research show in all three countries that large organisations indicate a substantial interest in corporate codes of ethics. There are, however, differences in the ways that the companies in each country implement and communicate their corporate codes of ethics and the benefits that they see being derived from them. The longitudinal comparison between 2001–2002 and 2005–2006 indicates changes in the implementation, communication and benefits of corporate codes of ethics in the three countries.

  • 5.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Vic., Australia.
    Singh, Jang
    Odette School of Business, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada.
    Payan, Janice M.
    Monfort College of Business, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO, USA.
    Callaghan, Michael
    School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Vic., Australia.
    The Embeddedness of Codes of Ethics in Organisations in Australia, Canada and USA2011In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 405-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to test the embeddedness of codes of ethics (ECE) in organizations on aggregated data from three countries, namely Australia, Canada and the United States. The properties of four constructs of ECE are described and tested, including surveillance/training, internal communication, external communication and guidance. The data analysis shows that the model has satisfactory fit, validity and reliability. Furthermore, the results are fairly consistent when tested on each of the three samples (i.e. cross-national validation). This cross-national study makes a contribution beyond previous descriptive or exploratory studies by using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Nevertheless, a number of limitations are raised, all of which provide opportunities for further research in refining, extending and testing the proposed ECE model in other cultural and corporate settings. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 6.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Gregory
    Deakin University, Geelong, Vic, Australia.
    Singh, Jang B.
    University of Windsor, Windsor, Canada.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Deakin University, Geelong, Vic, Australia.
    A cross-cultural construct of the ethos of the corporate codes of ethics: Australia, Canada and Sweden2009In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 253-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to develop and describe a construct of the ethos of the corporate codes of ethics (i.e. an ECCE construct) across three countries, namely Australia, Canada and Sweden. The introduced construct is rather unique as it is based on a cross-cultural sample seldom seen in the literature. While the outcome of statistical analyses indicated a satisfactory factor solution and acceptable estimates of reliability measures, some research limitations have been stressed. They provide a foundation for further research in the. field and testing of the ECCE construct in other cultural and corporate settings. We believe that the ECCE construct makes a contribution to theory and practice in the. field as it outlines a theoretical construct for the benefit of other researchers. It is also of managerial interest as it provides a grounded framework of areas to be considered in the implementation in organizations of corporate codes of ethics.

  • 7.
    Wood, Greg
    et al.
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Svensson, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Singh, Jang
    Odette School of Business, University of Windsor, Canada.
    Carasco, Emily
    University of Windsor, Canada.
    Callaghan, Michael
    Bowater School of Management and Marketing, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    Implementing the Ethos of Corporate Codes of Ethics: Australia, Canada and Sweden2004In: Business Ethics. A European Review, ISSN 0962-8770, E-ISSN 1467-8608, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 389-403Article in journal (Refereed)
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