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  • 1.
    Friel, R. J.
    et al.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    Harris, R. A.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    A nanometre-scale fibre-to-matrix interface characterization of an ultrasonically consolidated metal matrix composite2010In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part L, journal of materials, ISSN 1464-4207, E-ISSN 2041-3076, Vol. 224, no 1, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future 'smart' structures have the potential to revolutionize many engineering applications. One of the possible methods for creating smart structures is through the use of shape memory alloy (SMA) fibres embedded into metal matrices. Ultrasonic consolidation (UC) allows the embedding of SMAs into metal matrices while retaining the SMA's intrinsic recoverable deformation property. In this work, NiTi SMA fibres were successfully embedded into an Al 3003 (0) matrix via the UC layer manufacturing process. Initially the plastic flow of the Al matrix and the degree of fibre encapsulation were observed using optical microscopy. Then microstructural grain and sub-grain size variation of the Al 3003 (0) matrix at the fibre-matrix interface, and the nature of the fibre-matrix bonding mechanism, were studied via the use of focused ion beam (FIB) cross-sectioning, FIB imaging, scanning electron microscopy, and mechanical peel testing. The results show that the inclusion of the NiTi SMA fibres had a significant effect on the surrounding Al matrix microstructure during the UC process. Additionally, the fibre-matrix bonding mechanism appeared to be mechanical entrapment with the SMA surface showing signs of fatigue from the UC embedding process.

  • 2.
    Goulas, Athanasios
    et al.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical & Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Binner, Jon GP
    College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Engstrøm, Daniel S.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical & Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Harris, Russell A.
    Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Friel, Ross J.
    MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mechanical behaviour of additively manufactured lunar regolith simulant components2019In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part L, journal of materials, ISSN 1464-4207, E-ISSN 2041-3076, Vol. 233, no 8, p. 1629-1644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing and its related techniques have frequently been put forward as a promising candidate for planetary in-situ manufacturing, from building life-sustaining habitats on the Moon to fabricating various replacements parts, aiming to support future extra-terrestrial human activity. This paper investigates the mechanical behaviour of lunar regolith simulant material components, which is a potential future space engineering material, manufactured by a laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing system. The influence of laser energy input during processing was associated with the evolution of component porosity, measured via optical and scanning electron microscopy in combination with gas expansion pycnometry. The compressive strength performance and Vickers micro-hardness of the components were analysed and related back to the processing history and resultant microstructure of the lunar regolith simulant build material. Fabricated structures exhibited a relative porosity of 44–49% and densities ranging from 1.76 to 2.3 g cm−3, with a maximum compressive strength of 4.2 ± 0.1 MPa and elastic modulus of 287.3 ± 6.6 MPa, the former is comparable to a typical masonry clay brick (3.5 MPa). The additive manufacturing parts also had an average hardness value of 657 ± 14 HV0.05/15, better than borosilicate glass (580 HV). This study has shed significant insight into realising the potential of a laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process to deliver functional engineering assets via in-situ and abundant material sources that can be potentially used for future engineering applications in aerospace and astronautics. © 2018, IMechE 2018.

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