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  • 1.
    Anderberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Volvo Cars Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dimkovski, Zlate
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Thomas, Tom R.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Low friction and emission cylinder liner surfaces and the influence of surface topography and scale2019In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 133, p. 224-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A low friction piston ring pack, with tangential load halved, was tested in engines with four different cylinder liner finishes. Oil consumption, oil temperature and liner surface temperature were monitored at different load and speed levels, under similar test conditions. The two smoother surfaces generally kept lower oil consumption compared to the two rougher ones. Results were correlated using an area-fractal analysis. The relative area of the surface was calculated at different scales and the result was compared with the level of oil consumption for the different liner surfaces at different engine speeds. It was found that oil consumption was strongly correlated with scale for areas of above 1000 μm2 and below 20 μm2.

  • 2.
    Dimkovski, Zlate
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Tomanik, Eduardo
    MAHLE Metal Leve, Jundiai, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Profito, Francisco
    University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Influence of measurement and filtering type on friction predictions between cylinder liner and oil control ring2016In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 100, p. 7-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is of a vital importance to reduce the frictional losses in the engines and hence the fuel/energy consumption. The major contributors to this are the oil control ring and cylinder liner interactions difficult to understand when comparing the experimental and theoretical results. The latter largely depend on the liner surface measurement and filtering type used in the simulations. Therefore, low-pass and high-pass filtrations were applied and the friction behaviors between the filtered liner surfaces and a perfectly flat ring surface were simulated for different engine speeds. The surfaces low-pass filtered by lower cutoffs showed higher friction, while the type of de-noising revealed about two and a half times higher friction. Stylus surfaces showed larger friction than the interference ones. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Staffan
    et al.
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Nilsson, Per H.
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Ohlsson, Robert
    Volvo Powertrain AB.
    Anderberg, Cecilia
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK).
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK).
    New cylinder liner surfaces for low oil consumption2008In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 41, no 9-10, p. 854-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anticipated emission legislation and reduced fuel consumption are the main driving forces when developing new engines. Optimization of the active surfaces in the piston system is one possible way to meet the above demands. In this study the effects of surface topography and texture direction of the ring/liner contact on oil film thickness and friction were simulated and experimentally tested. "Low wear" results from the experimental wear tests with "glide honed" smooth liner surfaces supported the "low friction" simulation results. In addition a new wear volume sensitive surface roughness parameter, Rktot, based on the Abbot-Firestone bearing area curve was introduced.

  • 4.
    Wiklund, Daniel
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK).
    Wihlborg, A.
    Volvo Cars, MBO, Göteborg, Sweden.
    A friction model evaluated with results from a bending-under-tension test2009In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 42, no 10, p. 1448-1452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The friction in stamping is an important process parameter to control the flow of material in the tool. Consequently, it is also an important parameter in the design process of new stamping tools when numerical simulations of the forming operations are performed. In this work an advanced friction model is evaluated, which considers properties of surface topography, lubricant, sheet material, and process parameters such as sliding speed and pressure. The evaluation is made by comparing theoretical results with experimental ones obtained in a bending-under-tension friction test. The results show conformance in behaviour between the friction model and the experimental work. Furthermore, a model, which considers the influence of bulk plastic strains on the real area of contact, is investigated. The developed model predicts that the effective hardness of a surface is reduced by the presence of underlying plastic flow. It is found that when the strain rates are increased, the Stribeck curve becomes flatter and mixed lubrication is introduced at lower Hersey values. The friction model clearly shows the potential of improving the FE simulations of sheet metal forming operations, in comparison to the use of the classical Coulomb's friction model.

  • 5.
    Xiao, Li
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Production Engineering, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Björklund, Stefan
    KTH, Machine Design, Stockholm Sweden.
    Rosén, Bengt Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    The influence of surface roughness and the contact pressure distribution on friction in rolling/sliding contacts2007In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 694-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A numerical contact model is used to study the influence of surface roughness and the pressure distribution on the frictional behaviour in rolling/sliding contacts. Double-crowned roller surfaces are measured and used as input for the contact analysis. The contact pressure distribution is calculated for dry static contacts and the results are compared with friction measurements in a lubricated rolling/sliding contact made with a rough friction test rig. The mean pressure is suggested as a parameter that can be used to predict the influence of surface roughness on the friction coefficient in such contacts. The results show two important properties of the friction coefficient for the friction regime studied in this paper: (1) there is a linear decrease in friction coefficient as a function of the slide-to-roll ratio, and (2) the friction coefficient increases linearly with increasing mean contact pressure up to a maximum limit above which the friction coefficient is constant. The absolute deviation of experimental results from the derived theory is for most cases within 0.005.

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