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  • 1.
    Andreasson, Björn Pererik
    et al.
    Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland.
    Janousch, M.
    Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland.
    Staub, U.
    Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland.
    Meijer, G. I.
    IBM Research, Zurich Research Laboratory, Rüschlikon, Switzerland.
    Ramar, A.
    École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Villigen, Switzerland & Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Krbanjevic, J.
    École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Villigen, Switzerland.
    Schaeublin, R.
    École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Villigen, Switzerland.
    Origin of oxygen vacancies in resistive switching memory devices2009In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 190, p. Article number: 012074-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The resistive switching state in Cr-doped SrTiO3 was induced by applying an electric field. This was done in ambient air and in an atmosphere of H2/Ar. The distribution of the thereby introduced oxygen vacancies was studied by spatially resolved X-ray fluorescence images. It was concluded that the oxygen vacancies were introduced in the interface between the SrTiO3 and the positively biased electrode. © 2009 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  • 2.
    Glon, Fanny
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces. ENISE, Saint-Etienne, France.
    Flys, Olena
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Borås, Sweden .
    Lööf, Pär-Johan
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    3D SEM for surface topography quantification – a case study on dental surfaces2014In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 483, no 1, article id 012026Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3D analysis of surface topography is becoming a more used tool for industry and research. New ISO standards are being launched to assist in quantifying engineering surfaces. The traditional optical measuring instrumentation used for 3D surface characterization has been optical interferometers and confocal based instrumentation. However, the resolution here is limited in the lateral dimension to the wavelength of visible light to about 500 nm. The great advantage using the SEM for topography measurements is the high flexibility to zoom from low magnifications and locating interesting areas to high magnification of down to nanometer large surface features within seconds. This paper presents surface characterization of dental implant micro topography. 3D topography data was created from SEM images using commercial photogrammetric software. A coherence scanning interferometer was used for reference measurements to compare with the 3D SEM measurements on relocated areas. As a result of this study, measurements emphasizes that the correlation between the accepted CSI measurements and the new technology represented by photogrammetry based on SEM images for many areal characterization parameters are around or less than 20%. The importance of selecting sampling and parameter sensitivity to varying sampling is high-lighted. Future work includes a broader study of limitations of the photogrammetry technique on certified micro-geometries and more application surfaces at different scales. © Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd.

  • 3.
    Möllerström, Erik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Energiteknik. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Sandra
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Goude, Anders
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ottermo, Fredric
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Energiteknik.
    Hylander, Jonny
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Energiteknik.
    Turbulence influence on optimum tip speed ratio for a 200 kW vertical axis wind turbine2016In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 753, article id 032048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of turbulence intensity (TI) on the tip speed ratio for maximum power coefficient, here called λCp-max, is studied for a 200 kW VAWT H-rotor using logged data from a 14 month period with the H-rotor operating in wind speeds up to 9 m/s. The TI - λCp-max relation is examined by dividing 10 min mean values in different turbulence intensity ranges and producing multiple CP(λ) curves. A clear positive relation between TI and λCp-max is shown and is further strengthened as possible secondary effects are examined and deemed non-essential. The established relation makes it possible to tune the control strategy to enhance the total efficiency of the turbine.

  • 4.
    Möllerström, Erik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Ottermo, Fredric
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Comparison of inflow-turbulence and trailing-edge noise models with measurements of a 200-kW vertical axis wind turbine2019In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 1222, article id 012028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models of inflow-turbulence noise and turbulent-boundary-layer trailing-edge noise are compared to earlier measurements of a 200-kW vertical axis wind turbine so that conclusions regarding the origin of the aerodynamic noise can be drawn. The measurement campaigns, which aimed at establishing the noise emission value and locating the aerodynamic noise sources with a microphone array, are here both compared to further modified versions of the trailing-edge and inflow-turbulence models respectively. Unlike the case for horizontal axis wind turbine, inflow-turbulence noise is deemed as the prevailing noise mechanism. Reducing the self-induced turbulence could then be an effective way of lowering the noise levels for vertical axis wind turbines. Also, looking at the directivity of the inflow-turbulence noise model which indicate most noise in the cross-wind directions, a deviation from the standard downwind measurement position for measuring noise emission is suggested for the VAWT case.

  • 5.
    Rebeggiani, Sabina
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Sandberg, Alf
    Uddeholms AB, Hagfors, Sweden.
    A quantitative method to estimate high gloss polished tool steel surfaces2011In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 311, no 1, article id 012004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual estimations are today the most common way to assess the surface quality of moulds and dies; a method that are both subjective and, with today’s high demands on surfaces, hardly usable to distinguish between the finest surface qualities. Instead a method based on non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis is suggested. Several types of tool steel samples, manually as well as machine polished, were analysed to study different types of surface defects such as pitting, orange peel and outwardly features. The classification of the defect structures serves as a catalogue where known defects are described. Suggestions of different levels of ‘high surface quality’ defined in numerical values adapted to high gloss polished tool steel surfaces are presented. The final goal is to develop a new manual that can work as a ‘standard’ for estimations of tool steel surfaces for steel producers, mould makers, polishers etc.

  • 6.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    Blunt, Liam A.
    Centre for Precision Technologies, University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom.
    Thomas, Tom R.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces.
    On in-vivo skin topography metrology and replication techniques2005In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 325-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human skin metrology is an area of growing interest for many disciplines both in research and for commercial purposes. Changes in the skin topography are an early stage diagnosis tool not only for diseases but also give indication of the response to medical and cosmetic treatment. This paper focuses on the evaluation of in vivo and in vitro methodologies for accurate measurements of skin and outlines the quantitative characterisation of the skin topography. The study shows the applicability of in-vivo skin topography characterisation and also the advantages and limitations compared to conventional replication techniques. Finally, aspects of stripe projection methodology and 3D characterisation are discussed as a background to the proposed methodology in this paper.

  • 7.
    Rosén, Bengt-Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design (MTEK), Functional Surfaces. Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Fall, Andreas
    SCA Hygiene Products AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Rosén, Stefan
    Toponova AB, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Farbrot, Anne
    SCA Hygiene Products AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergström, P.
    SCA Hygiene Products AB, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Topographic modelling of haptic properties of tissue products2014In: Journal of Physics, Conference Series, ISSN 1742-6588, E-ISSN 1742-6596, Vol. 483, article id 012010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way a product or material feels when touched, haptics, has been shown to be a property that plays an important role when consumers determine the quality of products For tissue products in constant touch with the skin, softness" becomes a primary quality parameter. In the present work, the relationship between topography and the feeling of the surface has been investigated for commercial tissues with varying degree of texture from the low textured crepe tissue to the highly textured embossed- and air-dried tissue products. A trained sensory panel at was used to grade perceived haptic "roughness".

    The technique used to characterize the topography was Digital light projection (DLP) technique, By the use of multivariate statistics, strong correlations between perceived roughness and topography were found with predictability of above 90 percent even though highly textured products were included. Characterization was made using areal ISO 25178-2 topography parameters in combination with non-contacting topography measurement. The best prediction ability was obtained when combining haptic properties with the topography parameters auto-correlation length (Sal), peak material volume (Vmp), core roughness depth (Sk) and the maximum height of the surface (Sz). © Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd.

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