hh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Lethin, Connie
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Renom-Guiteras, Anna
    University of Witten/Herdecke, Witten, Germany.
    Zwakhalen, Sandra
    Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Soto-Martin, Maria
    University of Witten/Herdecke, Witten, Germany.
    Saks, Kai
    University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Zabalegui, Adelaida
    Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Challis, David J
    University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Nilsson, Christer
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Psychological well-being over time among informal caregivers caring for persons with dementia living at home2017In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 1138-1146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate informal caregivers’ psychological well-being and predicted increase in psychological well-being, when caring for persons with dementia (PwDs) living at home, related to caregiver, PwD and formal care (FC) factors.

    Method: A cohort study at baseline and 3 months’ follow-up in eight European countries. Caregivers included (n = 1223) were caring for PwDs aged ≥ 65 years at home. Data on caregivers, PwDs and FC were collected using standardized instruments. Regression analysis of factors associated with caregiver psychological well-being at baseline and 3 months later was performed.

    Results: Factors associated with caregiver psychological well-being at baseline were positive experience of caregiving, low caregiver burden, high quality of life (QoL) for caregivers, male gender of PwD, high QoL of PwD, few neuropsychiatric symptoms and depressive symptoms for the PwD. At follow-up, caregivers with increased psychological well-being experienced of quality of care (QoC) higher and were more often using dementia specific service. Predicting factors for caregivers’ increased psychological well-being were less caregiver burden, positive experience of caregiving, less supervision of the PwD and higher caregiver QoL, if PwD were male, had higher QoL and less neuropsychiatric symptoms. Furthermore, higher QoC predicted increased caregivers’ psychological well-being.

    Conclusion: Informal caregiving for PwDs living at home is a complex task. Our study shows that caregivers’ psychological well-being was associated with, among other things, less caregiver burden and higher QoL. Professionals should be aware of PwD neuropsychiatric symptoms that might affect caregivers’ psychological well-being, and provide proper care and treatment for caregivers and PwDs. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 2.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Rennemark, Mikael
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Berggren, Tomas
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Movement in mind: The relationship of exercise with cognitive status for older adults in the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care (SNAC)2008In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 212-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of light and strenuous exercise, and self-reported change in exercise status, with different components of cognitive function, and gender differences in this relation, in a large, representative sample included in the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC). Eight-hundred-and-thirteen participants in age-cohorts from 60-96 years completed a wide range of cognitive function tests, the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) and survey questions concerning exercise behaviour and exercise change with light or strenuous intensity. ANCOVA, controlling for age, education, depression, functional status and co-morbidity, demonstrated a main effect for light exercise, but not for strenuous exercise, on five of the six cognitive tests and the MMSE, for men but nor for women. A negative change in exercise status was associated with lower MMSE scores for men but not for women. Individuals exercising with light intensity several times a week had the highest cognitive test and MMSE scores and the inactive group had the lowest scores. The results of the study may contribute to increased knowledge in the exercise-mental health relationship for elderly and spawn new research specifically on gender differences in this relation.

  • 3.
    Norell Pejner, Margaretha
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health promotion and disease prevention.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Older patients’ in Sweden and their experience of the emotional support received from the registered nurse – a grounded theory study2014In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 79-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study intends to explore older patients’ experiences of the emotional support received from registered nurses (RNs). We also aimed to gain deeper knowledge about the process of how getting the support they need is managed by the patient.

    Methods: The study was conducted using the grounded theory method. Data were collected by interviewing 18 patients between 80 and 96 years old.

    Results: Reasons why older patients experienced the emotional support received from the RN are reflected in the categories ‘Meets my needs when I am irresolute’, ‘Meets my needs when I am vulnerable’ and ‘Meets my needs when I am in need of sympathy’. Reasons to the emotional support resulted in that patients experienced ‘A sense of being able to hand over’, which is therefore the core category of this study.

    Conclusion: Older patients’ experiences of emotional support are about obtaining relief. Patients were active participants and had strategies for which they wanted to share their emotions with the RN. In order to develop participatory care for older patients, we need more knowledge about how emotional support can be used as a nursing intervention. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  • 4.
    Rennemark, Mikael
    et al.
    School of Social Science, Växjö University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Halling, Anders
    County Counsil of Blekinge, Blekinge Institute for Research and Development, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Berglund, Johan
    School of Health and Sciences, Bleking Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Relationships between physical activity and perceived qualities of life in old age. Results of the SNAC study2009In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives:

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships of different types of quality of life to strenuous and light physical activity in old age.

    Methods:

    The Swedish SNAC-Blekinge baseline database, consisting of data on 585 men and 817 women 60-96 years of age, was utilized. The independent variables were light and strenuous physical activity. Four dependent variables concerned with various quality of life components were employed (well-being, engagement, emotional support and social anchorage). Age, gender, functional ability and co-morbidity were included as possible confounders. Non-parametric bivariate and multivariate statistical tests were performed.

    Results:

    Correlations suggested there to generally be a positive relationship between physical activity and quality of life. Multivariate logistic regression analyses controlling for possible confounders showed light physical activity to increase the odds of experiencing well-being, engagement and social anchorage, whereas strenuous physical activity increased the odds of experiencing engagement and emotional support. Thus, light physical activity and strenuous physical activity differed in their relation to quality of life generally.

    Conclusions:

    The results indicate that physical activity has a salutogenic effect by enhancing the quality of life, and it can be assumed to be connected to quality of life by generating pleasure and relaxation.

  • 5.
    Tucker, Sue
    et al.
    University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Sutcliffe, Caroline
    University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Bowns, Ian
    University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Challis, David
    University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Saks, Kai
    University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Verbeek, Hilde
    Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Cabrera, Esther
    University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.
    Karlsson, Staffan
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    University of Turku, Turku, Finland & Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Meyer, Gabriele
    University of Witten/Herdecke, Witten, Germany & Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle-Wittenberg, Germany.
    Soto, Maria
    Toulouse University Hospital, Toulouse, France.
    Improving the mix of institutional and community care for older people with dementia: an application of the balance of care approach in eight European countries2016In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 20, no 12, p. 1327-1338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine whether the mix of community and institutional long-term care (ILTC) for people with dementia (PwD) in Europe could be improved; assess the economic consequences of providing alternative services for particular groups of ILTC entrants and explore the transnational application of the ‘Balance of Care’ (BoC) approach.

    Method: A BoC study was undertaken in Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the UK as part of the RightTimePlaceCare project. Drawing on information about 2014 PwD on the margins of ILTC admission, this strategic planning framework identified people whose needs could be met in more than one setting, and compared the relative costs of the possible alternatives.

    Results: The findings suggest a noteworthy minority of ILTC entrants could be more appropriately supported in the community if enhanced services were available. This would not necessarily require innovative services, but more standard care (including personal and day care), assuming quality was ensured. Potential cost savings were identified in all countries, but community care was not always cheaper than ILTC and the ability to release resources varied between nations.

    Conclusions: This is believed to be the first transnational application of the BoC approach, and demonstrates its potential to provide a consistent approach to planning across different health and social care systems. Better comparative information is needed on the number of ILTC entrants with dementia, unit costs and outcomes. Nevertheless, the findings offer important evidence on the appropriateness of current provision, and the opportunity to learn from different countries' experience. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf