hh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Cristian
    et al.
    Institutionen för utbildningsvetenskap, Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Pendrill, Ann-Marie
    Nationellt Resurscentrum för Fysik, Lunds universitet, Sverige.
    En Delfistudie om lärares uppfattning av elevengagemang i NO-undervisningen2019In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 128-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What happens in a science classroom where students are engaged and how do teachers observe and interpret student engagement? This article highlights teachers’ perspective on students’ engagement in science education and to what extent it is connected to the scientific content. This approach complements earlier research which focuses mostly on students’ attitude towards science education and their interest in various topics in science.

    The findings are based on a three-stage Delphi survey distributed to 39 expert science teachers. The results shows science education with a range of different perspectives and that most teachers do not perceive any direct connection between specific science topics and the students’ engagement. The survey also shows that teachers to a high level interpret students’ emotional expressions and academic behavior as engagement rather than their cognitive behavior.

  • 2.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ideland, Malin
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Science for life - a conceptual framework for construction and analysis of socio-scientific cases.2009In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework to be used as a tool for analyzing work with socio-scientific issues (SSI) and for constructing SSI cases in secondary school. The framework consists of six components describing the more detailed characteristics of SSI. The components were chosen to reflect what we know from research about what might have an impact on students’ learning and interest in science. Six socio-scientific cases were then constructed and these are discussed in the article. The cases are relevant in that they both display the characteristics of SSI and meet the requirements of the Swedish national curriculum. The components and the cases are described in a table. This work is the first step in an evidence-based research project aiming at investigating if, how and why students and teachers in secondary school develop knowledge and interests when working with SSI. © Naturfagsenteret

  • 3.
    Granklint Enochson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Redfors, Andreas
    Högskolan Kristianstad, Sektionen för lärande och miljö, Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Fem elevers föreställningar om organsystem: vad händer i kroppen när vi dricker vatten?2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 160-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has earlier been shown on a group level that it is difficult for 9th grade students (15-16 years old) in a Swedish school to understand how water is transported in the human body. The detailed analysis of five Swedish students in the 9th and final year of compulsory school concerning their ideas about water transportation is presented here. The empirical data consists of drawings, answers to a questionnaire with both open ended and multiple-choice questions, and student interviews. The analysis shows that all the students struggle to produce explanations involving the three organ systems: digestive, blood and excretion systems and they seem to use a variety of explanatory models as basis for their reasoning. Possible ways of understanding this are discussed together with implications for future teaching

  • 4.
    Högström, Per
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sverige & Luleå tekniska universitet, Luleå, Sverige.
    Ottander, Christina
    Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik, Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Benckert, Sylvia
    Institutionen för fysik, Umeå universitet. Umeå, Sverige.
    Laborativt arbete i grundskolans senare år: Lärares perspektiv2010In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 80-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe the results from interviews with science teachers in lower secondary school. The teachers were asked what they wanted to achieve with laboratory work, what difficulties they experienced and if there were any differences between lab work in biology, chemistry and physics. The results show that the teachers wanted lab work to help the students develop their understanding, to make them interested and to develop their laboratory skills. Some of the teachers described lab work that included scientific inquiry but not, specifically, knowledge about how to systematically investigate phenomena in nature. Aspects of nature of science were rare. Lack of time to discuss with the students during lab work was seen as one difficulty which resulted in problems for students to linkobservables to scientific ideas. Laboratory exercises in chemistry were often regarded too abstract while lab work in physics and biology were much easier to link to everyday life.

  • 5.
    Högström, Per
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Ottander, Christina
    Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Benckert, Sylvia
    Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Lärares mål med laborativt arbete: Utveckla förståelse och intresse2006In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 54-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to analyse secondary school teachers’ goals for laboratory work. What general goals do teachers have for labwork and what goals appear when teachers describe real labwork used in their own teaching? What goals are expressed in the written laboratory instructions? Eleven science teachers in secondary school participated in individual semi-structured interviews. The teachers’ laboratory instruction sheets were analysed with respect to intended learning outcome. The analysis of teachers’ general goals showed five themes and that cognitive aspects were the most prominent. Furthermore, when teachers talked about specific labwork used in their own teaching affective aspects were more important and an additional theme appeared. It was also shown that laboratory instructions supported teachers’ goals to develop students understanding of concepts and phenomena. However, goals concerning to think and reflect upon labwork were not supported by the laboratory instructions.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Research on Education and Learning within the Department of Teacher Education (FULL).
    Barns kommunikation och lärande i fysik genom praktiska experiment2005In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 58-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Physics is often considered to be a difficult, abstract and boring school subject. This article describes astudy of 11-year old children’s discussions of scientific concepts related to experiments in the classroomand to the Liseberg amusement park. The study was made in May 2004 and the empirical materialconsists of tape recorded group discussions from the preparation lesson before the amusement parkvisit. The analysis focuses on how children use, develop and verify their knowledge, and how theyexpress an increased construction of knowledge and understanding through the dialogues. The discussionsindicate an ability to develop, explain and exemplify physical phenomena and concepts andconnect them to their everyday experiences

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Pernilla
    Halmstad University, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Research on Education and Learning within the Department of Teacher Education (FULL).
    Recognizing the needs - Student teachers´ learning to teach from teaching2008In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 92-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on an exploration of the ways in which primary science student teachers recognizeand learn about issues that shape their own professional learning. The paper discusses differentperspectives of “knowledgebase needed for teaching” and Shulman’s concept of pedagogical contentknowledge, and explores how elements of knowledge are to be recognized and further developedwithin primary teacher education. Primary science student teacher participants (n = 25) were stimulatedto use portfolios as a tool to reflect upon situations within their six weeks teaching practice inpre- and primary schools in order to facilitate recognizing their knowledge needs. The results give aninsight into what situations within the teaching practice that student teachers consider as importantfor their own learning to teach primary maths and science

  • 8.
    Nygård Larsson, Pia
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Malmö, Sverige.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Semantiska vågor – elevers diskursiva rörlighet i gruppsamtal2017In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 17-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to use and understand a scientific language students need the ability to move between everyday and scientific discourses. This article analyses exploratory talks, and use of language when students collaboratively discuss a science assignment. The aim is to develop an analytical tool that can facilitate understanding and visualization of students' language use. The concepts of discursive mobility (Nygård Larsson, 2011) and semantic waves (Martin, 2013; Maton, 2013) constitute the starting point in the analysis and the students’ discussions are explored by using the concepts of semantic gravity and semantic density. The results display that all of the students’ conversations contain a certain degree of discursive mobility. However, there exists differences in how the conversations move between everyday and scientific languages and in terms of how successful the students are to formulate a specific subject language. In some conversations, everyday expressions become a productive resource and a bridge to a more scientific language.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf