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  • 1.
    Svensson, Göran
    et al.
    Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
    Wood, Greg
    Deakin University, Warrnambool, Australia.
    A Conceptual Framework of Corporate and Business Ethics across Orgainzations: Structures, Processes and Performance2011In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to introduce and describe a conceptual framework of corporate and business ethics across organizations in terms of ethical structures, ethical processes and ethical performance. Design/methodology/approach: A framework is outlined and positioned incorporating an ethical frame of reference in the field of organizational chain management.

    Findings: A number of areas and sub-areas of corporate and business ethics are framed in the context across organizations. Research limitations/implications: The introduced framework should be seen as a seed for further development and refinement. It provides opportunities for further research of ethical concerns across organizations.

    Practical implications: Organizations may benefit from the findings and insights presented and they may be used to enhance their ability to manage, monitor and evaluate ethical business practices across organizations.

    Social implications: Changing societal and market patterns may enforce organizations to address ethical concerns across organizations. A myopic approach restricted to the judicial system may become insufficient and unsatisfactory from the perspective of other stakeholders of the organization.

    Originality/value: The framework makes a contribution bringing in ethical concerns across organizations, providing a basis for their ethical values and culture, as well as asymmetric relationships in terms of power and dependence. The authors believe that a true learning organization needs to realise the importance of an extended view of its endeavors of corporate and business ethics in terms of ethical structures, ethical processes and ethical performance across organizations.

    © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 2.
    Örtenblad, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Of course organizations can learn!2005In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 213-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a comment for all those writers who claim that organizations cannot learn. The author consistently rejects this notion. Rather the author contends that organizations can learn, in at least two different ways. The author reviews some of the common arguments against organizational learning, and tries to answer the opponents. The main argument against the critics is that they are too busy to look for evidence that organizations are not like individuals and that organizations therefore cannot learn. Instead, the author argues that it is a question of level of analysis. The author also suggests that theories as well as knowledge in general are metaphoric, implying that organizations as such of course are able to learn. The organizational learning perspectives can, of course, be used by employers and managers in order to avoid efforts that help the individuals to learn. But they can also be appropriate perspectives of learning that help in avoiding large investments on organizational learning efforts that might be unnecessary.

  • 3.
    Örtenblad, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    On differences between organizational learning and learning organization2001In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 125-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper looks at and discusses differences between the concepts of organizational learning and (the) learning organization. Since there still seems to be confusion regarding the meaning of the two concepts, aims to clarify the two main existing distinctions, that organizational learning is existing processes while learning organization is an ideal form of organization. Also distinguishes between a traditional and a social perspective of organizational learning, which the existing distinctions have not ‚ at least not explicitly. Thus, distinctions are made between three concepts. In addition to the improvement of the existing distinctions, suggests two complementary ones ‚ entities of learning and knowledge location. These two distinctions might make it easier to distinguish also between the two perspectives of organizational learning.

  • 4.
    Örtenblad, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Senge’s many faces: problem or opportunity?2007In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 108-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to discuss both possibilities and problems with Senge’s (1990) many faces in The Fifth Discipline, i.e. the fact that different authors refer to different excerpts from his book as his version of the learning organization. Design/methodology/approach - The paper shows that the authors’ understandings of Senge, in which a literature review resulted, are seen in the light of theories of travelling of management ideas, particularly the "translation model". Findings - The paper finds that both possibilities and problems with Senge’s many faces were found. A fatal problem is that the many faces jeopardize the confidence in the concept and eventually its existence. But the strong connections to Senge’s book, that the authors have, reduces the problems, and Senge’s many faces might not cause that much trouble after all. Research limitations/implications - The paper shows that anyone who wishes to can, for different reasons, refer to Senge, and his version of the learning organization, and thereby gain legitimacy. One does not have to be very accurate; as it seems, almost anything goes. Practical implications - In the paper the "translation model" is divided into two sub-models, which probably will sharpen future translation research. Originality/value - The paper is a study in which it is shown how authors understand other authors. This is an example that is rarely seen. Both possibilities and problems are discussed with vagueness to Senge’s many faces. This is not very common. A special case of the translation model is developed (the "smorgasbord model"), better suited to deal with the type of idea that focuses on copying of excerpts from a specific book than the traditional translation model (the "whispering game model").

  • 5.
    Örtenblad, Anders
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    The learning organization: towards an integrated model2004In: Learning Organization, ISSN 0969-6474, E-ISSN 1758-7905, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 129-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an integrated model of the learning organization. It is based on empirical research of the learning organization literature, as well as on practitioners' understandings of the concept where learning organizations were often described in terms of four distinct individual aspects, no more and no less. This article argues these aspects cannot be treated as separate, and that the four aspects have to be combined in order to create a true learning organization. The four aspects are: learning at work; organizational learning; developing a learning climate; and creating learning structures. The article suggests that only those organizations that have implemented all of the aspects should be called ‚"learning organizations", and those organizations that have implemented only one aspect should be called "partial learning organizations"

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