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  • 1.
    Almgren Mason, Suzanne
    Dept. of Culture and Media/Ethnology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Life in the Labyrinth: A Reflexive Exploration of Research and Politics2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is about exploring the politics within and around research. The starting point is a European project which ran from late 1997 to the end of 2000. It was called "Self-employment activities concerning women and mi­norities: their success or failure in relation to social citizenship policies" and had as its objective to provide the EU-Commission with recommendations for improved self-employment policies. Background material was comple­mented by interviews with "experts", but the main source of information was in the form of biographical interviews with the self-employed, or for­merly self-employed, themselves. The qualitative method was used as a way of researching how individuals' background and experiences influenced their decision to become self-employed as well as their tendency to use labour market policies available for starting businesses. It was also a way to find out how those policies impacted on the individuals' lives. The conse­quent recommendations included a suggestion for broadening existing policies to comprise social aspects as well as financial allowances, and also the caution that self-employment was perhaps not the best solution to labour market and social exclusion.

    This latter doubt arose during project work, as did questions about methodology, the role of the researcher, and eventually about the politics that inform research. Only briefly touched upon in the project reports, these issues instead became the basis for the thesis. A reflexive rereading of the Final Report led to a critical examination of the political uses of con­cepts and categories, of how stereotypes affect research, and of the embeddedness in ethnocentric discourses of both research and researcher. The use of postcolonial and feminist theory, discourse analysis and a social constructionist perspective broadened the analytical possibilities and fur­thered understanding of the connections between politics and research. A conclusion is that a comprehensive change in the social order as well as in people's conscience is required to stem ethnic discrimination in society and the perpetuation of stereotypes and preconstructed categories in research.

  • 2.
    Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Workshops as Nodes of Knowledge Co-production: Beyond Ideas of Automagical Synergies2017In: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice / [ed] Sarah Pink, Vaike Fors & Tom O'Dell, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 53-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3. Brunow, Dagmar
    Hess, Sabine/Ramona Lenz (Hg.): Geschlecht und Globalisierung. Ein kulturwissenschaftlicher Streifzug durch transnationale Räume.2003In: Linke Mythen / [ed] Roger Behrens, Martin Büsser, Tine Plesch & Johannes Ullmaier, Mainz: Ventil , 2003, Vol. 12, p. 276-276Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Soundscapes als akustisches Gedächtnis der Stadt: künstlerische Strategien gegen Gentrifizierung2011In: Access denied: Ortsverschiebungen in der realen und virtuellen Gegenwart, Mainz: Ventil , 2011, Vol. 20, p. 37-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Berg, Martin
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Jonnie
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Språk, kultur och samhälle.
    Cooking for perfection: Transhumanism and the mysteries of kitchen mastery2016In: Confero: Essays on Education, Philosophy and Politics, ISSN 2001-4562, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 111-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Barnen och det goda boendet: En studie om barn, barnfamiljer och boende i hyreslägenheter2008Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Globala familjer2009In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 3, p. 180-183Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Integration in Denmark2009In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 39, p. 202-206Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM), Contexts and Cultural Boundaries (KK).
    Orienten i Sverige2008In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, p. 173-176Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Kjellman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Högdin, Sara
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Tideman, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Everyday life for young adults with intellectual disabilities in public and private spaces2012In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, E-ISSN 1365-2788, Vol. 56, no 7-8, p. 810-810Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Anorthoscopic vision: Designing and Sensing the Future2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As a means of thinking about the future and issues of uncertainty, I would like to take my point of departure in a project I completed a few years ago (O’Dell 2013) concerning plans to develop a huge particle sciences facility in Lund, called the European Spallation Source (ESS). I was the only ethnologist working with a team of 10 other scholars, all from different disciplinary backgrounds, and I focused my research on what I framed as a cultural history of the future. The ESS, if it were ever to be built (and this was very uncertain since this Big Science facility involved financing from 17 different nations and many billions of Euros, in a time of economic crisis), would not be completed until the year 2019. But procuring the financial resources needed to construct the facility, and to mobilize public opinion in favor of such a development, implied the deployment of a massive publicity campaign. The actors involved in this campaign ranged from the regional government, and city planners of Lund to Lund University and local land owners.

    Twenty years earlier debates raged as plans were made to construct the Öresund Bridge, linking Sweden and Denmark. In these debates visions of the future collided. Would the bridge improve the natural environment in Öresund or be detrimental to it? Would a strong region be a threat to the Swedish and Danish national projects, or an economic motor propelling them forward? Would a bridge facilitate the flow of narcotics and crime through the region, or constitute a precondition for a safer and more dynamic home for the citizens of the region?

    As the idea of the ESS was launched, these types of debates were remarkably missing. In their place one found a rich flora of dreams of how this Big Science facility would spur the development of new golf courses, swimming facilities, public transportation, new schools etc. Architects produced models of the future that were put on display, and the regional planners published all kinds of drawings and CGIs of how the future would come to look in Lund. If the funding for ESS was uncertain, visions of the future seemed to flourish, and I would argue, “a better future” was the only thing that seemed certain.

    So what can this empirical example (very shortly presented here) tell us about the future and issues of certainty and uncertainty? For my own thinking, I am struck by the role “vision”, and “ways of seeing”, function here.

    The mode in which all of this is done (and here I am thinking particularly of the work of urban and regional planners) is a kin to what Paul Virilio (2000:38) describes as anorthoscopic vision which “involves restricting vision by masking all but the barest slit of the visual field, so that a figure is not seen all at once, but is successively revealed”. Vision is always framed, and perhaps visions of the future are destined to be more starkly framed than visions of the present. In the present the viewer always has the option of turning her/his head, or the possibility of peaking around the corner. Visions of the future are defined by stakeholders, and are thus more difficult to gain secondary perspectives upon. But in anorthoscopic vision, it is the minimum that is offered. The form of the object being viewed is not seen in its entirety but in sequential segments, which allude to the actual object’s form, shape and contours. In the case of the ESS the anorthoscopic visuals that are offered may in part be an outcome of the fact that no one is still sure of what the ESS will actually look like in its entirety. But anorthoscopic vision is a steering and controlling form of vision, that in this case even helps conceal the fact that no one yet knows exactly what we are looking at when we think (and when we are told) that we are looking at the ESS. When there is actually, nothing yet to see.

    But anorthoscopic vision does more than offer us a “minimum field of sight” it plays with and reorganizes time. It is a time machine. ESS only exists as a CGI and paper model. But roads are being built, train lines are being drawn, and new neighborhoods are growing. The future in this sense is very present. It is not something that necessarily lies in front of us, but as this case helps illustrate it is very much with us now. It is changing Lund physically, and in a very real manner. So it might be interesting to reflect upon what types of futures we are discussing and encountering in this workshop. Some futures (most of them) will never materialize. They will only have a life in the form of a dream or vision. Some futures will change and slowly come into being as something “Other” than we are envisioning now. And some futures are very present and with us, affecting us and changing us in ways that we may or may not be fully aware of. 

  • 12.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Looking Through, to Look At: Glass and the Cultural Challenges to Monitoring, Measuring, and Mediating Bodies2015In: In the flow – People, Media, Materialities: ACSIS conference 15-17 June 2015, Norrköping / [ed] Johanna Dahlin & Tove Andersson, Norrköping: ACSIS, Linköping University , 2015, p. 32-32Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, consumers face a rapidly expanding market of technology designed to measure, monitor, and mediate the status of their bodies, and communicate it to the surrounding world. Jawbone, Apple Watch, Nike Run Keeper, and the GoPro Camera are all pieces of body monitoring technology that were vying for consumer attention in 2015. But what types of cultural roots lay behind this interest in high-tech body monitoring accessories? How could an interest in body monitoring develop, and what types of knowledge were they predicated upon? In order to approach these questions, this paper opens by examining some of the most common and low-tech items in our homes and lives from ordinary glass and bathroom scales to home lighting. 

  • 13.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Multi-Targeted Ethnography2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As a concept, ethnography is currently riding on a wave of popularity. Having branched out from the folds of anthropology and ethnology it is now currently in vogue in a range of disciplinary fields from contemporary cultural sociology to architecture, design, marketing and management. But the question this article focuses upon concerns the ends of ethnography. What is it capable of becoming, and how might its limits be pushed?

    Pursuing this question, the article argues for a need to rethink and re-theorize ethnography from a slightly different direction than that which is predominantly taught in the cultural and social sciences. It is direction that the article describes as distributive in stance and orientation rather than accumulative. That is, while ethnography is usually framed and taught as an accumulative process of gathering and assembling materials (an endeavor of creating order) the article argues for a need to more systematically theorize (and teach) ethnography in relation to the audiences it is meant to touch, move, and have an impact upon.

    In order to do this, the text takes critical inspiration in George Marcus’ writings on multi-sited ethnography and pushes the concept in the direction of ethnography’s audiences, and towards the development and theorization of new modes of multi-targeted ethnography.

    Central to the line of argumentation made in the paper is an emphasis upon a metaphorical shift in how ethnography is thought of: a shift that moves from the realm of “writing culture” to one of composing ethnography. Writing culture, it is argued, is a cognitive textual endeavor, but composing ethnography moves further, bringing the senses and embodied experiences into play. It asks how, in addition to writing, can culture and cultural experiences be rendered sensually to engage and move different publics and to ever gauge, calibrate and configure that rendering to best meet the needs and competencies of the audience of the day. And the phrasing “of the day” is important here, because it is argued that a disposition to multi-targeted ethnography understands the ethnographic outcome to be temporary, contingent and ever open to change and development.

    This requires a bricolage approach to the melding of analytical/theoretical perspectives with materials, but it also necessitates the development of performative techniques that move beyond textual representations, and it involves explicitly formulated distributive ambitions often not addressed in traditional anthropological courses: including, but not limited to the oral, visual, and digital skills needed to engage different publics and communicate results, the ability to translate concepts and explanations in ways that make them relevant in different contexts, and a belief in the ability of cultural analysis to provide solutions.

  • 14.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Regionauts, Mobility and the Boarder Work of Cultural Coalescence2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15. Palmsköld, Anneli
    Mode och återbruk2010In: Modemedvetna museer: Nordiska museets och Skansens årsbok 2010 / [ed] Christina Westergren, Berit Eldvik, Stockholm: Nordiska museets förlag, 2010, p. 233-251Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Being in a mediated world: self-tracking and the mind–body–environment2017In: Cultural Geographies, ISSN 1474-4740, E-ISSN 1477-0881, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 375-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-tracking is an increasingly ubiquitous everyday activity and therefore is becoming implicated in the ways that everyday environments are experienced and configured. In this article, we examine theoretically and ethnographically how the digital materiality of these technologies mediates and participates in the constitution of people’s tacit ways of being in the world. We argue that accounting for the presence of such technologies as part of everyday environments in this way offers new insights for non-representational accounts of everyday life as developed in geography and anthropology and advances existing understandings of these technologies as it has emerged in sociology and media studies.

  • 17.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, VaikeHalmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).O'Dell, TomHalmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Introduction: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice: Opportunities and Challenges of Working in the In-between2017In: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice / [ed] Sarah Pink, Vaike Fors & Tom O'Dell, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 3-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). School of Media and Communication, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Sumartojo, Shanti
    School of Media and Communication, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    The lit world: living with everyday urban automation2018In: Social & cultural geography (Print), ISSN 1464-9365, E-ISSN 1470-1197, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 833-852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we develop and advance the concept of the lit world by bringing together literatures about everyday lighting, automation in everyday life and human perception, along with our ethnographic research into people’s experience of automated lighting in Melbourne, Australia. In doing so we formulate and argue for an approach to automation that situates it as part of everyday mundane worlds and acknowledges its entanglement with the emergent and experiential qualities of everyday environments as they unfold. We demonstrate this through the example of automated lighting, understood as a situated technology that has contingent effects and participates in the making of particular ways of seeing and feeling the world. We thereby argue for an account of automation that reaches beyond its potential for the management of human (and other) behaviour, to ask how the qualities and affordances of automated technologies might seep out of their intended domains, and create new perceptual and experiential opportunities. In a context where automation is increasingly prevalent in everyday life, such attention to the experience and use of automated technologies which already exist on a large scale is needed. Urban lighting is an example par excellence of automation in the world because it has a long history beyond the recent association of automated technologies with code and digital infrastructures. As scholars debate how automated technologies will become part of our future digital lives, understanding how people live in a lit world offers a starting point for considering how we might live with other anticipated algorithmic forms of automation. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  • 20.
    Pitkänen, Kim
    Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM).
    Ekologiskt Hållbar Turism: En nisch för naturens bästa2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Det är allmänt känt att turismen för med sig negativa ekologiska konsekvenser och har gjort det sedan charterturismen på allvar slog igenom under -50 och 60-talet. På senare tid har alternativ turism börjat gro och tagit sig upp. Att massturismen är dominerande råder det inga tvivel om men det är viktigt att alternativ turism såsom ekoturism ser dagens solljus, en nisch i turismen som ska vara ekologiskt hållbar.

    Vandringen mot toppen är lång och brant för den ekologiskt hållbara turismen, nyligen har den börjat se dagsljuset men massturismen tar åt sig nästan all energi från solljuset. Det innebär att den ekologiskt hållbara turismen måste kämpa i hård konkurrens med de andra aktörerna på marknaden. Aktörer som i dagsläget och även i fortsättningen kommer vara starkare, men det säger inte att det inte finns plats för ekologiskt hållbar turism.

    Uppsatsen visar att det finns ett bra utbud av litteratur om ekoturism som tar upp både skrämmande exempel där varumärket utnyttjats till skadligare verksamhet och exempel med rätt använd ekoturism som ett verktyg för värnande av biologisk mångfald. Den litterära granskningen redogör för betydelsen av ekologiskt hållbar turism och vad som kan göras för att nå dit.

    En enkätundersökning gjordes i sydvästra Sverige med syfte att ta reda på hur folket ser på ekologiskt hållbar turism. Vissa intressanta skillnader fanns mellan personer av samma kön och kvinnor gentemot män, men glädjande var att de flesta av dem 136 svarande trodde eller hoppades att den ekologiskt hållbara turismen har en ljus framtid att gå till mötes. I Sverige har vi idag 81 av Naturens Bästa godkända ekoturistarrangörer. Trots skuggan från de större verksamheterna verkar det finnas tillräckligt med ljus och plats för den ekologiskt hållbar turismen att slå sig in på marknaden.

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