hh.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Workshops as Nodes of Knowledge Co-production: Beyond Ideas of Automagical Synergies2017In: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice / [ed] Sarah Pink, Vaike Fors & Tom O'Dell, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 53-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Cuesta, Marta
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    Candomblé:: a Study on Afro-Brazilian Identity1998In: Corriente del Golfo : Revista Noruega de Estudios Latinoamericanos, ISSN 0804-7303, no 3-4, p. 221-241Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Cuesta, Marta
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Doing autobiographies: a critical approach2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    My point of departure is that feminist research has to have an emancipatory ambition. This paper aims to reflect around self biography as method. Biographies are testimonies from different angels of experiences, including testemonies. Postcolonial feminist theories criticism about west biographical texts focus on a critique in that often use biographical works, which are excluded from the History. On the other way highlight this standpoint on differential self biographies, as a form into positioning on marginalization, and in different contexts. The ambition with this paper is to analyse a couple self biographies written by immigrants. But when I develop the analysis of it’s I will involve my voice in the middle of their. It because, my ambition is to highlight contextualize these works in a critical understanding about “situated knowledge”.

     

     

  • 4.
    Cuesta, Marta
    Department of Social Anthropology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Duality! A way of living: The role of the intellectuals in the construction of Candomblé identity1993In: Research report / Department of Sociology, Lund University, ISSN 1403-5936, p. 1-14Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Cuesta, Marta
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Röster och motstånd: En studie om (genus)representationer inom hiphop2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Denna artikel behandlar begrepp (genus)motståndet, som illustreras med utgångspunkt i texten ”A Woman's World” skriven av Nabila Abdul Fattah. Ambitionen är att kunna kritiskt resonera om hur ”testimonier” av marginalisering synliggörs i form av (protest)röster i det svenska samhället. Detta med fokus på en diskussion av ”representationer av olikheter”, ur postkoloniala feministiska teorier.

  • 6.
    Cuesta, Marta
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    The centrality of gender and identity in Candomblé: a reflection about religion, gender and society1997In: Universidad Nacional de Montevideo/Ibero America Institutet (red.) La Ciudadania en el Mercosur, Ibero America InstitutArticle, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Cuesta, Marta
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Universidad de Montevideo, Montevideo, Uruguay.
    Welcome to Candomblé: A discussion about religion, ethnicity and global process1996In: Research report / Department of Sociology, Lund University, ISSN 1403-5936, p. 1-17Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    ICT use in the flesh: How to academically represent the sensuous work of the human body2011In: Current Issues in European Cultural Studies: ACSIS Conference 2011, Norrköping, 15–17 June 2011, Norrköping: Advanced Cultural Studies Institute of Sweden (ACSIS), Linköpings universitet , 2011, p. 90-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is stated that the use of ICTs has become integrated as a fundamental part of the infrastructure in contemporary ever-day social life. For instance, new ICT products play a decisive role for the performance of adolescents’ peer-group communication; it has literally become part of a “way of living” (Christensen & Røpke, 2010). In this paper I explore how a sensory ethnographical approach (Pink, 2009) may contribute to interesting perspectives on the construction of this “new normality”. Thinking of use of new media as a kind of work that implies cultural production, i.e. activities that include both consumption and production of web-based user-generated content, gives an opportunity to place the work (agency) of the human body in the nexus of inquiry. The questions I will discuss in this paper originates from research I have done on teenage use of on-line photo diaries; How are our senses attuned toward cultural forms of participation in web-based activities that have turned into routine? How can this kind of sensory data be represented through sequential art?

  • 9.
    Kindblad, Christopher
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Social Change, Learning and Social Relations (SLSR).
    Gift and exchange in the reciprocal regime of the Miskito on the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua, 20th century2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is about cultural change in a local Miskitu community on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua, which began when communal property started to be used for both food gifts and market exchange as a result of increasing commercial exploitation. The author explores a contradiction that developed in the economic system during the 20th century. Between 1860 and 1960 the Atlantic Coast was an economic enclave. Men worked as wage labour at foreign companies, and sent home money and purchased goods to women who worked in subsistence agriculture. Communal property was reserved for consumption and food gifts, and there was a stable coexistence of long-term gift and short-term exchange. But after 1960 a commercial exploitation of communal property began that competed with the custom of food gifts in the 1970s, and led to over-exploitation of lobster and turtle. This development was interrupted during the 1980s - the decade of the Sandinista revolution - , but continued after the 1990s. Population increase, external exploitation and few wage labour opportunities have increased the pressure on communal property, and threaten to intensify the contradiction.

  • 10.
    Kittelman-Flensner, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Social and Behavioural Studies, University West, Vänersborg, Sweden.
    Korp, Peter
    Department Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Department Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    "Everyone can play football no matter where they come from": Discourses in open sport activities for newly arrived children and teenagers2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent international crises has brought about the largest movements of refugees since World War II. There is a need for constructive strategies to manage the challenges the comprehensive migration imposes on society's ability to integrate new residents. Research highlights the central role of civil society organizations to create trust, social networks and civic engagement, i.e. basic conditions for a democratic society (Putnam, 2013; Wijkström, 2012). International research also shows that civil society organizations and the voluntary sector can have a compensating function for economically and socially disadvantaged groups (Field, 2005; Portes & Rumbaut; Zhou & Kim, 2006). Many of these organizations have an ambition to welcome newcomers and offer a social milieu and a meaningful leisure time. Sports are often considered as contributing to the inclusion in society of marginalized groups (Misener & Mason, 2006; Schulenkorf & Edwards, 2012). There is a well-established notion that participation in sports promotes positive identity construction, social inclusion and education for democratic citizenship (cf. Donnelly & Coakley, 2002). However, there is little scientific evidence that sport has the potential to fulfill this role,

    In Sweden a strong emphasis has been put on the role of sports clubs to actively strengthen democratic values and equality. Different governments have provided extensive funding for this purpose, but also for the purpose of including children and youth independent of who they are and were they come from. However, there is little scientific evidence that sport clubs and their activities has the potential to fulfill this role in the community and there is very little systematically developed knowledge of how sporting activities and programs should be designed to achieve positive social outcomes (Rich, Misener & Dubeau, 2015). It is the leaders in the clubs that have the challenging task of ensuring that the objective of developing democratic values, equality, inclusion and well-being come true. Therefore it is important to examine how they understand and translate such normative goals into action.

    The overall aim of the study is to explore the ways in which a sport club, in the context of open sport activities, are working with and potentially promoting values such as intercultural understanding, inclusion and equality among young people, of which a significant part are new arrivals in Sweden.  Research questions focused in this presentation are:

    • How are the open sports activities  organized, and what are their stated purposes?
    • What kind of discourses and practices dominate among the leaders of the open sport activities?

    The sport club studied has since 2010 worked actively with various social projects aiming to promote intercultural understanding, inclusion, gender equality, counteract effects of social and economic segregation and increase young people's agency. The club is a football club which conducts organized football training for children and young people but have also "open sports activities" which is free of charge and requires no registration. Every other Friday arrange the sport club Sporty Friday” where they offer young people the opportunity to try basketball, football, table tennis, boxing, martial arts, wrestling and fencing. They also offer open football for both boys and girls and every week they engage 100-300 children and teenagers. These activities are financially supported by the municipality and are the focus of this research project.

  • 11.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, VaikeHalmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).O'Dell, TomHalmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Pink, Sarah
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    O'Dell, Tom
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Introduction: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice: Opportunities and Challenges of Working in the In-between2017In: Theoretical Scholarship and Applied Practice / [ed] Sarah Pink, Vaike Fors & Tom O'Dell, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 3-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Sumartojo, Shanti
    et al.
    RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Pink, Sarah
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Lupton, Deborah
    University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, Australia.
    LaBond, Christine Heyes
    University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, Australia.
    The affective intensities of datafied space2016In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 21, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of datafication - which refers to the idea that many aspects of life can be rendered into digital data which can subsequently be analysed and used to understand, predict and guide interventions in society - has been both enthusiastically engaged with and critically deconstructed in recent literatures. In this article, we explore the relevance of datification for understanding the spatiality of everyday life. In doing so, we argue for a refigured concept of datafication through theoretical and empirical scholarship focused on affect. We suggest that a renewed concept of datafication - that is, of datafied space - offers a framework for how we dwell in and move through a world where digital data about humans have an increasing presence. To make our arguments, we offer an account of a recent study of cycle-commuting and self-tracking in Melbourne and Canberra, Australia. We used helmet-mounted action cameras and video interviews in a 'digital sensory ethnography' to explore the entanglement of bodies, bicycles, digital devices, data and affect that shape how people move through and make sense of what we call 'datafied space'. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf