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  • 1.
    Blixt, Lukas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Harmath, Laszlo
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Uttorkning av Betong2011Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Engkvist, Gustav
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Hansson, Sebastian
    Halmstad University.
    FE-modellering av hjullast på sandwichpanel2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This bachelor thesis in mechanical engineering was performed during the spring2015 in collaboration with Composite Consulting Group in Laholm. TheComposites Consulting Group works mainly with design and details of differentcomposite projects, their main area is FE-calculations, 3D-modelling andmechanical tests with composite materials.The aim of this bachelor thesis was to simplify the calculation process of solidmechanics for sandwich panels by simulation with computer software. The goalwas to decrease the time for the design and calculation process of the constructionand the cost of the practical tests. Our task was to build a static three dimensionalmodel with the computer software Abaqus, where the result should correspondwith the practical pressure tests in laboratory.The project started with collection of material data from Composites ConsultingGroup and by learning the software Abaqus, simultaneously a specification wasdeveloped in corporation with the company. Later on, a static wheel pressuremodel in the software Abaqus was produced which simulated the behavior of thesandwich panel during static wheel-pressure by a pallet truck. The results from thewheel-pressure model were verified with the practical tests.The project led to a static three dimensional wheel- contact model with thesoftware Abaqus to calculate complex wheel-contact problems on sandwichpanels. The wheel-contact model corresponded to the practical test results. Thecontact model with Abaqus enabled faster and more efficient design anddevelopment process of new sandwich panels. It also provided better analysis ofthe sandwich panels’ behavior during wheel- contact loading.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Erlingsson, Jonas
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    FRP i brokonstruktion: -varför används FRP inte i Sverige2015Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    FRP stands for Fiber Reinforced Polymer. FRP materials have yet to be introduced inbridge construction in Sweden. Composite materials can through combined componentsand manufacturing processes be tailored to fit advanced bridge designs. FRP materials arestrong, durable and of low weight. FRP materials give the superstructure reduced weightand are therefore a suitable alternative for industrial prefabrication. This report shows thatFRP materials are possible to use in bridge construction. With the introduction of a specificEurocode we are confident that FRP materials will become a competitive alternative inbridge construction in Sweden in the future.

  • 4.
    Friel, R. J.
    et al.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    Masurtschak, Simona
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    Harris, Russell A.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    Enabling dissimilar fibre embedding and explicit fibre layout in ultrasonic consolidation2010In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Adaptive Structures and Technologies 2010, University Park, PA: Curran Associates, Inc., 2010, p. 303-310Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasonic Consolidation (UC) is a manufacturing technique based on the ultrasonic metal welding of a sequence of metal foils which are bonded to one another in a layer by layer manner. It combines the ability of additive and subtractive manufacturing techniques to create complex three-dimensional shapes. Due to moderate applied pressures and the relatively low temperatures experienced by a sample during manufacture, UC operates as a solid-state process. UC could potentially enable the fabrication of smart structures via integration of sensor, actuator and reinforcement fibres within a single metal matrix. Previous issues with the optimal placement of fibres directly between foils during UC have been identified. Also, different types of integrated fibres require different UC process conditions and thus present complications when integrating them in combination. To truly exploit the full potential of UC for smart structure capabilities it is envisioned that a high volume fraction of dissimilar fibres are required to be integrated together within a single metal matrix structure. Research on a new method to consolidate fibres securely and more accurately during UC is presented. Channels created prior to UC within metal matrix composites are investigated as a method to aid the embedding of high volume fractions of different fibres in unison without damage. Initial research using a 200 W fibre laser as an enabling tool to create channels of specific geometry onto a previously UC processed surface is detailed. The research verifies that controlled channelling on a UC surface is possible and that channel geometry is dependent on: laser traverse speed, laser beam power, and shroud gas flow rate. © (2010) by the International Conference on Adaptive Structures and Technologies (ICAST).

  • 5.
    Lund, Per
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Detaljerad FE-modellering2015Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes a study of the core materials used in composite panels under static indentation. The work was conducted together with CCG in Laholm, Sweden. These materials work well when designing sandwich panels due to their low weight and high compression strength. As the cores show a non-linear behavior problems can arise when constructing panels and oftentimes lead to choosing very conservative solutions that are not optimized.The main focus of this thesis has been the modelling and simulation of materials in the software ABAQUS to analyze and predict the materials behavior and reduce the time needed for the design of new panels. The result is presented in force- displacement plots as well as von Mises visualization plots and is sustained by theories of both contact mechanics and mathematics. The group endeavored to work in a scientific manner by verifying the hypotheses through theory and experiments in order to accomplish accurate results.

  • 6.
    Masurtschak, Simona
    et al.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Friel, R. J.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Harris, Russell A.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    New concept to aid efficient fibre integration into metal matrices during ultrasonic consolidation2017In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part B, journal of engineering manufacture, ISSN 0954-4054, E-ISSN 2041-2975, Vol. 231, no 7, p. 1105-1115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasonic consolidation has been shown to be a viable metal-matrix-based smart composite additive layer manufacturing process. Yet, high quantity fibre integration has presented the requirement for a method of accurate positioning and fibre protection to maintain the fibre layout during ultrasonic consolidation. This study presents a novel approach for fibre integration during ultrasonic consolidation: channels are manufactured by laser processing on an ultrasonically consolidated sample. At the same time, controlled melt ejection is applied to aid accurate fibre placement and simultaneously reducing fibre damage occurrences. Microscopic, scanning electron microscopic and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analyses are used for samples containing up to 10.5% fibres, one of the highest volumes in an ultrasonically consolidated composite so far. Up to 98% of the fibres remain in the channels after consolidation and fibre damage is reduced to less than 2% per sample. This study furthers the knowledge of high volume fibre embedment via ultrasonic consolidation for future smart material manufacturing. © Institution of Mechanical Engineers.

  • 7.
    Monaghan, T.
    et al.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    Capel, A. J.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    Christie, S. D.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    Harris, R. A.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    Friel, R. J.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    Solid-state additive manufacturing for metallized optical fiber integration2015In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 76, p. 181-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of smart, Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) structures through the use of solid-state Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM) is currently hindered by the fragility of uncoated optical fibers under the required processing conditions. In this work, optical fibers equipped with metallic coatings were fully integrated into solid Aluminum matrices using processing parameter levels not previously possible. The mechanical performance of the resulting manufactured composite structure, as well as the functionality of the integrated fibers, was tested. Optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) analysis were used to characterize the interlaminar and fiber/matrix interfaces whilst mechanical peel testing was used to quantify bond strength. Via the integration of metallized optical fibers it was possible to increase the bond density by 20–22%, increase the composite mechanical strength by 12–29% and create a solid state bond between the metal matrix and fiber coating; whilst maintaining full fiber functionality. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 8.
    Osberg, Jacob
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Konov, Vadim
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Utveckling av extraherbar kärna: Koenigsegg2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 9.
    Schwope, L-A
    et al.
    Solidica Inc., Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
    Friel, R. J.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Johnson, K. E.
    Solidica Inc., Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
    Harris, R. A.
    Wolfson School of Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom.
    Field repair and replacement part fabrication of military components using ultrasonic consolidation cold metal deposition2009In: NATO Science and Technology Organization: RTO-MP-AVT-163 - Additive Technology for Repair of Military Hardware, 2009, p. 22-1-22-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Timely repair and replacement of military components without degrading material properties offers tremendous opportunities for cost and schedule savings on a number of military platforms. Effective field-based additive manufacturing repair approaches have proven difficult to develop, as conventional additive metal deposition technologies typically include a molten phase transformation and controlled inert deposition environments. The molten stage of laser and electron beam based additive processes unfortunately results in large dimensional and microstructural changes to the component being repaired or re-fabricated. As a result, high residual stresses and unpredictable ductility profiles in the repair area, or the re-fabricated part, make the final product unsafe for redeployment. Specifically, the heat affected zone associated with traditional deposition-based repair methods can produce a low strength, non-homogenous region at the joint; these changes in the materials properties of the repaired parts are detrimental to the fatigue life, and are a major concern where cyclic loading is experienced. The use of solid state high power Ultrasonic Consolidation (UC) technologies avoids the liquid-solid transition complexity and creates a predictable “cold” bond. This method then allows for strong, homogenous structures to be manufactured and repaired in the field and opens the door for the use of high strength repair material that may reduce the frequency of future failure itself. In addition, UC further offers the opportunity to provide enhanced functionality and ruggedness to a component either during repair or from original manufacture by allowing the embedding of passive and functional elements into the new fabricated component or feature.

1 - 9 of 9
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