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  • 1.
    Dalzochio, Marina Schmidt
    et al.
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Renner, Samuel
    Laboratório de Ecologia e Evolução, Universidade do Vale do Taquari – UNIVATES, Lajeado, Brazil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Description of the final stadium larva of Erythrodiplax media (Odonata: Libellulidae) with preliminary key to known South American larvae in the genus2018In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 93-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The larva of Erythrodiplax media is described and illustrated based on two exuviae of reared larvae and one final stadium larva collected in Xangri-lá, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The larva of E. media can be distinguished from other species of Erythrodiplax by the presence of lateral spines on S8 and S9, the number of premental setae (n = 22), palpal setae (n = 7) and by the mandibular formula. We also provide a preliminary key to known South American larvae in the genus. © 2018 Worldwide Dragonfly Association.

  • 2.
    Diehl, Sebastian
    et al.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden & Integrated Science Lab (IceLab), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Thomsson, Gustaf
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kahlert, Maria
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Guo, Junwen
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Liess, Antonia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Inverse relationship of epilithic algae and pelagic phosphorusin unproductive lakes: Roles of N2 fixers and light2018In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 63, no 7, p. 662-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Phosphorus (P) often limits the biomass of primary producers in freshwater lakes. However, in unproductive northern lakes, where anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is low, N instead of P can limit primary producers. In addition, light can be limiting to primary producers at high concentrations of coloured dissolved organic matter (cDOM), as cDOM is the major determinant of light penetration in these lakes.

    2. To address resource limitation of epilithic algal biomass, we repeatedly sampled epilithon (periphyton on stony substrata) in 20 lakes covering a large, correlated cDOM and N-deposition gradient across boreal and subarctic Sweden. Across these lakes, pelagic total N (TN) and total P (TP) were positively correlated, and benthic light supply was negatively correlated, with cDOM. Microscopically determined algal biovolume and epilithic carbon (C), N and P were subsequently regressed against benthic light supply and pelagic TN and TP.

    3. Patterns in epilithic biovolume were driven by N2-fixing cyanobacteria, which accounted for 2%–90% of total epilithic biovolume. Averaged over the growing season, epilithic algal biovolume, C and N were negatively related to TP and positively to TN, and were highest in the clearest, most phosphorus-poor lakes, where epilithon was heavily dominated by potentially N2-fixing cyanobacteria.

    4. A structural equation model supports the hypothesis that cDOM had two counteracting effects on total epilithic algal biovolume: a positive one by providing N to algae that depend on dissolved N for growth, and a negative one by shading N2-fixing cyanobacteria, with the negative effect being somewhat stronger.

    5. Together, these findings suggest that (1) light and N are the main resources limiting epilithic algal biomass in boreal to subarctic Swedish lakes, (2) epilithic cyanobacteria are more competitive in high-light and low-nitrogen environments, where their N2-fixing ability allows them to reach high biomass, and (3) epilithic N increases with N2 fixer biomass and is—seemingly paradoxically—highest in the most oligotrophic lakes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  • 3.
    Maaroufi, Nadia
    et al.
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden & Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Kristin
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science (EMG), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bach, Lisbeth H.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science (EMG), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bokhorst, Stef
    Department of Ecological Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Liess, Antonia
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS). Department of Ecology and Environmental Science (EMG), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gundale, Michael J.
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    Kardol, Paul
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    Nordin, Annika
    Umeå Plant Science Center (UPSC), Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden.
    Meunier, Cédric L.
    Department of Ecology and Environmental Science (EMG), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden & Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung (AWI), Biologische Anstalt Helgoland, Helgoland, Germany.
    Nutrient optimization of tree growth alters structure and function of boreal soil food webs2018In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 428, p. 46-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrient optimization has been proposed as a way to increase boreal forest production, and involves chronic additions of liquid fertilizer with amounts of micro- and macro-nutrients adjusted annually to match tree nutritional requirements. We used a short-term (maintained since 2007) and a long-term (maintained since 1987) fertilization experiment in northern Sweden, in order to understand nutrient optimization effects on soil microbiota and mesofauna, and to explore the relationships between plant litter and microbial elemental stoichiometry. Soil microbes, soil fauna, and aboveground litter were collected from the control plots, and short- and long-term nutrient optimization plots. Correlation analyses revealed no relationships between microbial biomass and litter nutrient ratios. Litter C:N, C:P and N:P ratios declined in response to both optimization treatments; while only microbial C:P ratios declined in response to long-term nutrient optimization. Further, we found that both short- and long-term optimization treatments decreased total microbial, fungal, and bacterial PLFA biomass and shifted the microbial community structure towards a lower fungi:bacterial ratio. In contrast, abundances of most fungal- and bacterial-feeding soil biota were little affected by the nutrient optimization treatments. However, abundance of hemi-edaphic Collembola declined in response to the long-term nutrient optimization treatment. The relative abundances (%) of fungal-feeding and plant-feeding nematodes, respectively, declined and increased in response to both short-term and long-term treatments; bacterial-feeding nematodes increased relative to fungal feeders. Overall, our results demonstrate that long-term nutrient optimization aiming to increase forest production decreases litter C:N, C:P and N:P ratios, microbial C:P ratios and fungal biomass, whereas higher trophic levels are less affected. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.

  • 4.
    Renner, Samuel
    et al.
    Ecologia e Sensoriamento Remoto, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado-RS, Brasil.
    Périco, Eduardo
    Ecologia e Sensoriamento Remoto, Centro Universitário Univates, Lajeado-RS, Brasil.
    Sahlén, Göran
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, The Rydberg Laboratory for Applied Sciences (RLAS).
    Man-made lakes form species-rich dragonfly communities in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (Odonata)2016In: Odonatologica, ISSN 0375-0183, Vol. 45, no 3-4, p. 135-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the forest types occurring in Southern Brazil is the Mixed Ombrophilous Forest (MOF), a subtype of the Atlantic Forest and one of the biodiversity hotspots on Earth. We sampled adult Odonata at 30 locations in the Floresta Nacional de São Francisco de Paula (FLONA-SFP), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, a national reserve which is divided into several sectors of MOF, planted Araucaria angustifolia, Pinus elliottii used for sustainable and financial purposes, and open fields. There are three types of aquatic environments in the reserve: lakes, swamps, and rivers/streams. Our aim was to obtain an overview of the species’ distribution patterns in the three types of aquatic environments and to evaluate the species occurring in lakes, an exclusively man-made habitat in this area. We recorded 46 species from seven odonate families; 25 species (x = 5.71 ± 1.77 SD) occurring in rivers/ streams, 24 in lakes (11.57 ± 2.15) and 21 in swamps (5.22 ± 3.60). Using Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NmDS), we showed that the species composition differed clearly between the three types of aquatic habitats. While swamps and rivers/streams had a relatively similar and uniform species composition, species in the lakes were more varied but the total species number was almost as high as that of the rivers/streams. The lake communities also differed distinctly from those of the other habitats, and we assume that the lake species originate from other degraded areas in the vicinity, indicating that the remains of the Atlantic Forest has already been strongly altered by humans. Given the poor knowledge of the Odonata in the Atlantic Forest/MOF, we hope that our study may increase the understanding of the communities, and contribute to the development of conservation measures for this fragmented biome.

  • 5.
    Sahlén, Göran
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
    Hedström, Ingemar
    Boston University, College of Arts and Sciences, Boston, MA, USA.
    The larva of Mecistogaster linearis, with notes on its abundance in lowland rainforest of Costa Rica (Odonata: Pseudostigmatidae)2005In: International Journal of Odonatology, ISSN 1388-7890, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The larva of Mecistogaster linearis is described and illustrated from specimens collected within or near the Río Dantas Wildlife Refuge at the north-western border of the Barbilla National Park on the Costa Rican Caribbean slope. Characters of F-0 larvae permit easy separation from Megaloprepus caerulatus, a species coexisting with M. linearis. Diagnostic characters include overall colour, shape of head, prementum and caudal gills. Exuviae may be determined using shape of mandibles. Two types of branched setae are present on tibiae and tarsi. Most are 3-branched but on front tarsi they are instead feather-shaped. It is suggested that these setae are used for eye-cleaning. M. linearis was a relatively rare but regularly occurring species in the study area throughout the 3-year study period. © 2005 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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