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  • 1.
    Ailm, Kajsa
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Lindroos, Max
    Halmstad University.
    Vilka utmaningar finns för design av socialt användarengagemang på digitala spelplattformar?2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate social user engagement on digital gaming platforms through the research question: What challenges are there when designing for social engagement on digital gaming platforms? Social user engagement means that user's engagement between each other is facilitated through functions on the digital platform such as Facebook and Twitter. Previous research on user engagement on digital gaming platforms has tried to create user engagement through new social functions. However, there are problems for designers of digital gaming platforms because users choose to interact and communicate on other digital social platforms. The fact that users choose to communicate on other digital platforms than on digital gaming platforms may be linked to the fact that users of digital gaming platforms have a different purpose and need with their interaction. It is therefore important when designing digital gaming platforms to have new functions as an extension of the digital gaming platform's basic functions and that user's game-related goals are prioritized. The study was based on a design-oriented research approach where three design elements have been implemented and evaluated through a probe. The study resulted in four design challenges that are intended to target designers of digital gaming platforms as a support for the development of digital gaming platforms. The identified design challenges are recommended to be considered to improve user's experience on digital gaming platforms.

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  • 2.
    Aliqkaj, Luigj
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Paulsson, Jacob
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Utmaningar gällande upplevt förtroende för autonoma bilar: En kvalitativ studie om vilka designutmaningar det innebär gällande upplevt förtroende i det initiativskifte som sker i autonoma bilar2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial intelligence (AI) has been widely integrated, especially in the automotive industry where autonomous cars are becoming more common. As more and more cars get autonomous functions, the drivers' previous role changes. Drivers go from manually operating the car to monitoring it, so that the autonomous functions work. As the driver's role changes, challenges arise for drivers' experiences for autonomous functions. The purpose of the study is to identify these challenges that lead to the question: What challenges does the design of initiative shift in autonomous cars in relation to perceived trust entail? To create understanding, a qualitative study has been conducted where a design ethnographic approach was used as the basis for the presented illustration. The participants in the study were people who own a car with autonomous functions. The study contributes with knowledge of how perceived reliance in relation to the change in initiative that takes place in autonomous cars, which is presented in an illustration. The conclusion reflects societal and ethical challenges regarding the design of autonomous cars. 

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  • 3.
    Arvidsson, Susann
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Gilljam, Britt-Mari
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing. Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Ruland, Cornelia Maria
    The Centre for Shared Decision Making and Collaborative Care Research (CSDM), Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway & University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Nordby-Bøe, Trude
    The Centre for Shared Decision Making and Collaborative Care Research (CSDM), Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Nursing.
    Redesign and Validation of Sisom, an Interactive Assessment and Communication Tool for Children With Cancer2016In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 4, no 2, article id e76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Children with cancer undergo intensive and long treatment periods that expose them and their families to a number of difficult physical, mental, and social challenges. Empowering children by actively involving them in their care can help them to cope with these challenges. It can, however, be difficult for children to be involved and talk about their illness experiences in a "traditional" conversation with health care professionals, especially for younger children. Sisom (Norwegian acronym "Si det som det er" or "Tell it how it is") is an interactive computer-based assessment and communication tool to give children (aged 6-12 years) with cancer a "voice" in their care. Because of technological advances and widespread use of mobile devices Sisom had to be redesigned to better meet the needs of children of today.

    OBJECTIVE: To redesign Sisom for use on mobile devices and to validate and adapt it for use in a Swedish population of children with cancer.

    METHODS: A user-experience design was used. Content adaptation included forward-backward translation by Swedish and Norwegian translators. Healthy children (n=5), children with experiences of cancer treatment (n=5) and their parents (n=5), and pediatric nurses (n=2) were then involved in culturally adapting Sisom to the Swedish context. The iterative low- and high-fidelity evaluation was supported by a think aloud method, semistructured interviews, and drawings to capture children's views of Sisom. The redesign and evaluation continued until no further changes or improvements were identified by the participants or the researchers.

    RESULTS: Children, parents, and pediatric nurses offered many suggestions for improvements to the original version in terms of content, aesthetics, and usability of Sisom. The most significant change that emerged through user input was a modification that entailed not using problem-focused statements in the assessment items. The parents and pediatric nurses considered the revised assessment items to be general and less diagnosis specific. The evaluation of aesthetics resulted in brighter colors and more positive and exciting details in the animations. The evaluation of usability included improvements of the verbal instructions on how to navigate in Sisom 2, and also that the answers to assessmentitems in Sisom 2 should be saved to provide the children with the option to pause and to continue answering the remaining assessment items at a later stage.

    CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this paper describes the process of using user-experience design with children in order to redesign and validate an interactive assessment and communication tool and how the outcomes of this process resulted in a new version, Sisom 2. All participants confirmed the usability and qualities of using the final version. Future research should be directed toward the implementation of Sisom 2 in clinical practice and to evaluate outcomes from individual and organizational levels.

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  • 4.
    Berbyuk Lindström, Nataliya
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sofkova Hashemi, Sylvana
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Hahn, Judit
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Palviainen, Åsa
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Asatiani, Aleksandre
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kedra, Joanna
    University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Development Speeded up by Necessity: The Future of Higher Education and Academic Work Online2021In: AMCIS 2021: Proceedings. 3., Association for Information Systems, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic had a dramatic impact on our lives and living. In higher education, it led to a swift shift from on-campus to online education resulting in practices of emergency remote teaching through virtual classrooms. In this project, we seek to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities that this abrupt, enforced change to online education entailed for faculty and students in Sweden and Finland. We aim to examine the evolution of online work and study practices, their impact on the teaching and learning environment, and new expectations imposed on the faculty and students. Our goal is to enhance the theoretical understanding of e-learning, developing guidelines on how to make online education effective, exploring the impact of pandemics on the future of higher education. © AMCIS 2021.

  • 5.
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Smart jewellery: measuring the unknown2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-tracking devices and apps often measure and provide interpretations of personal data in a rather straightforward way, for instance by visualising the speed and distance of a run or the quality of sleep during a night. There is however a growing number of devices that take the data analysis further by providing insights and algorithmic advices about domains of our lives that are otherwise thought of as difficult to grasp. This paper explores two devices of this kind, namely the Moodmetric and the ŌURA which are two recently released smart rings with associated mobile apps that claim to measure emotions and rest, promote happiness and help users to perform better. Whereas several studies have shed light over how users engage with self-tracking apps and devices, little attention has been paid to how these technologies stem from dreams, hopes and imaginaries of designers and developers. This paper approaches self-tracking from a producer perspective in order to frame how users and their everyday lives are imagined by designers and how these assumptions are built into the technologies. Empirically, the paper is based on a content analysis of blog posts, marketing materials and user guides from the ŌURA and Moodmetric companies along with video interviews with company representatives as well as recordings of their public appearances. Engaging with the field of software studies as well as the emerging field of self-tracking studies, this paper aims at providing a basis for further design oriented studies of self-tracking.

  • 6.
    Bergström, Emil
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Exploring the Design Context of AI-Powered Services: A Qualitative Investigation of Designers’ Experiences with Machine Learning2022In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 13336, p. 3-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) has provided user experience (UX) designers with a richer toolset. To use technologies such as Machine Learning (ML) that can expand their creative capacity to design intelligent services. ML has the capability to enhance the user experience, for example, by improving efficiency, personalization, and context-aware adaptation. However, research suggests ML as a challenging design material in UX practice, such as difficulties in comprehending data dependencies when prototyping, or the lack of tools and methods for evaluating adaptive user experiences. Previous research indicates that lack of knowledge transfer into the UX design practice may hamper innovative potential. This work aims to provide new insights on how designers think about – and experience – design for AI-powered services. It is important to make ML-powered services beneficial and sustainable for end-users, organizations, and society. Therefore, we explore UX designers’ reflections and experiences of using ML in a design context. We have performed nine deep explorative interviews with professional designers that work with ML. The respondents have different backgrounds, seniority, and work in different sectors. The collected interview material was qualitatively analyzed and resulted in five conceptual themes for how UX designers experience the design context surrounding AI-powered services: 1) Absence of competence, 2) Lack of incentive for competence development, 3) Challenges in articulating design criteria, 4) Mature vs. Immature clients, and 5) Lack of support for ethical concerns. We provide implications for how these themes affect the design context and practice. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

  • 7.
    Bibri, Simon Elias
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    The human face of ambient intelligence: Cognitive, emotional, affective, behavioral and conversational aspects2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As a socially disruptive technology, Ambient Intelligence is ultimately directed towards humans and targeted at the mundane life made of an infinite richness of circumstances that cannot fully be considered and easily be anticipated. Most books, however, focus their analysis on, or deal largely with, the advancement of the technology and its potential only. This book offers a fresh, up-to-date, and holistic approach to Ambient Intelligence. As such, it addresses the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary aspects of the rapidly evolving field of Ambient Intelligence by seamlessly integrating and fusing it with artificial intelligence, cognitive science and psychology, social sciences, and humanities. It is divided into two main parts: Part 1 is about different permutations of enabling technologies as well as core computational capabilities, namely context awareness, implicit and natural interaction, and intelligent behavior. It details the existing and upcoming prerequisite technologies, and elucidates the application and convergence of major current and future computing trends. Part 2 is an accessible review and synthesis of the latest research in the human-directed sciences and computing and how these are intricately interrelated in the realm of Ambient Intelligence. It deals with the state-of-the-art human-inspired applications which show human-like understanding and exhibit intelligent behavior in relation to a variety of aspects of human functioning - states and processes. It describes and elaborates on the rich potential of Ambient Intelligence from a variety of interrelated perspectives and the plethora of challenges and bottlenecks involved in making Ambient Intelligence a reality, and also discusses the established knowledge and recent discoveries in the human-directed sciences and their application and convergence in the ambit of Ambient Intelligence computing. This seminal reference work is the most comprehensive of its kind, and will prove invaluable to students, researchers, and professionals across both computing and the human-directed sciences. © 2015 Atlantis Press and the author(s).

  • 8.
    Björkén-Nyberg, Cecilia
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    To Be Immersed or Not: The Use of Dialect in Audiobook Narration2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immersive storytelling is becoming increasingly popular these days. Immersive media is commonly associated with the technologies of VR and AR where sound reinforces a primarily visual effect. However, considering the rapidly growing demand for audiobook storytelling, audio narration alone seems to be highly suitable for facilitating a state of immersion. Listeners often testify that they experience a strong sense of presence in the story world, even imagining that they are not merely observing events but actually participating in them.

    According to Marie-Laure Ryan and her poetics of immersion in Narrative as Virtual Reality 2, concrete details such as exact place names contribute to strengthening the reader’s sense of being immersed in a place and to visualise it. Does that also apply to vocal delivery? Is the sense of being immersed reinforced by the use of dialect or sociolect? Or is it possible that it has an alienating effect? This talk will explore the use of dialect in audiobooks as either an immersive-enhancing element or an alienating factor.

  • 9.
    Brooks, Anthony
    et al.
    Aalborg University Esbjerg, Esbjerg, Denmark.
    Petersson, Eva
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Recursive reflection and learning in raw data video analysis of interactive ’play’ environments for special needs health care2005In: Proceedings of 7th International Workshop on Enterprise networking and Computing in Healthcare Industry, 2005. HEALTHCOM 2005. / [ed] Heung Kook Choi, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2005, p. 83-87, article id 1500399Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology influences the situation of people’s every day life and this, in turn, has an impact on opportunities for health related quality of life. This paper presents how findings from two separate and distinct feasibility investigations under the SoundScapes body of research corroborate an important aspect of the original methodology of the concept such as to have influenced its future design and application in its health field context. The primary purpose of the independent studies was to test the potential of utilizing sensor technology to empower control of multimedia feedback across different sample groups of abilities and to test the effects on these participants. © 2005 IEEE.

  • 10.
    Brooks, Eva
    et al.
    Aalborg university, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS).
    Children’s programming of robots by designing fairytales2021In: Digital Learning and Collaborative Practices: Lessons from Inclusive and Empowering Participation with Emerging Technologies / [ed] Eva Brooks; Susanne Dau; Staffan Selander, New York: Routledge, 2021, p. 158-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we seek to highlight the importance of allowing and including imagination and creativity in schoolchildren's work with programming robots to enhance learning and to generate interest in programming as such, using classic fairytales as a frame. Theoretically, the chapter draws on Vygotsky’s concepts of imagination and creativity to argue the case that programming embraces imaginative and emotional interactions, which children learn within creative activities, based on examples from an empirical study of children’s learning of programming through representation of fairytales. 

  • 11.
    Brooks, Eva
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Centrum för lärande, kultur och samhälle (CLKS), Lärande, Profession och Samhällsutveckling.
    Evolving Playful and Creative Activities When School Children Develop Game-based Designs2018In: Interactivity, Game Creation, Design, Learning, and Innovation: 7th EAI International Conference, ArtsIT 2018, and 3rd EAI International Conference, DLI 2018, ICTCC 2018, Braga, Portugal, October 24–26, 2018, Proceedings / [ed] Anthony Brooks, Eva Books, Cristina Sylla, Heidelberg: Springer, 2018, p. 485-495Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of digital technologies in classroom settings is relentlessly getting stronger and has shown to have powerful playful qualities. In recent years, digital game-based learning (DGBL) have been introduced in schools. In this paper we investigate an innovative approach to game-based learning, namely to use game design activities as motivators for developing children’s creative and social skills as well as other kinds of learning scenarios, e.g. computational. It is based on two cases, where game design activities by means of a narrative approach were applied in both analogue and digital form. The unit of analysis is game design activities. Hence, game design activities with the participating children (3 rd graders, 9–10 years of age), creative materials and technologies, and children’s actions as well as interactions are analyzed. The research questions posed in this study are: (1) What activities develop when school children design games in two cases, as an analogue activity, and as an activity including technology?; and (2) How do the learning environment, including the artefacts, employed mediate these activities? The outcomes of the study indicate that the game design workshop session which included both creative material and technology unfolded more combinational activities, which indicate that the inclusion of technology facilitated a more critical design decision making. However, the game design workshop session including only creative material exhibited a more thorough knowledge about what the material could do and what the children themselves could do with the material, which seemed to result in more playful interactions between the children. © 2019, ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering.

  • 12.
    Brooks, Eva
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Sjöberg, Jeanette
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Playfulness and Creativity as Vital Features when School Children Develop Game-based Designs2022In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 137-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of digital technologies in classroom settings is relentlessly getting stronger and has shown to have powerful playful qualities. In recent years, digital game-based learning (DGBL) has been introduced in schools. In this paper we explore game-based design activities to unfold playful and creative actions and interactions among children. The study is based on two cases, where game design activities were applied in both analogue and digital form. The unit of analysis is game design activities. The research questions posed in this study are: (1) What activities develop when school children design games in two similarly framed workshop cases, where one included analogue material and the other a combination of analogue and digital material?, and (2) How do children interact in a learning environment framed by purely analogue-based material as opposed to a learning environment framed by a combination of analogue and digital material? A thematic analysis identified three themes: exploratory activities; combinational activities; and transformative activities. These themes suggest that the game design workshop sessions including only analogue material facilitated playfulness promoting creative actions in children’s production of different ideational considerations. In a mixed activity combining analogue and digital material, creativity in the form of fluency was represented by the way the children produced their ideas, which opened up for playfulness, e.g. in the form of humour. The analysis showed that a procedural activity design including pre-designed theme framing children’s constructions facilitated an open-ended activity. © The Authors

  • 13.
    Börjesson, Erika
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Information transparency design: Supporting sustainable consumer behaviour in the clothing industry2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Digital technologies can be used to provide consumers in the clothing industry with information in a transparent way that supports sustainable consumer behaviour. Consumers expect more information that can support their sustainable behaviour but have little trust in the information, thus introducing the consumer need for more information transparency in the clothing industry which is the subject of this research study. A qualitative interview study is used to explore consumer informational needs and sustainable consumer behaviour in the clothing industry by purchasing second-hand clothing or adopting a digital clothing sharing service. The theory of planned behaviour was applied in the construction of the study and in the thematic analysis to understand consumer behaviour. Findings show that information transparency can be designed to provide subjective relevance, social -, financial-, and temporal transparency and information accessibility to support sustainable consumer behaviour in the clothing industry because it increases trust, understandability and accessibility. The study contributes with knowledge of additional dimensions for information transparency and particularly to service research by showing that consumers need information transparency to promote a collaborative relation between consumers and companies.

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  • 14. Carlsson, André
    et al.
    Stray Andreasson, Fanny
    Tv:n står på som sällskapsljud: En studie om hur överkonsumtion kan belysas genom provokativ digital design2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, we live in a world where overconsumption has drained the Earth's resources. Peopleare being urged to become more aware of their energy consumption, and the EU is fundingwork for more sustainable design, but more work is needed.

    Provocative design is a growing area that has been shown to both increase users' commitmentand awareness and motivate reflection. There’s also an interest for implementing provocativedesign in digital design that has grown larger. We see potential in combining provocativedesign and digital design to make users more aware about their energy consumption and helpthem reflect over it.

    This study has examined how provocative design can be implemented in a digital design tohighlight overconsumption. By studying the respondents' reactions, we saw that it is possible,with an understanding of provocative design, the context and the target group, to create adigital provocative design that can illuminate the problem for users and make them reflect.We saw a strong connection to the social contexts and therefore also offer suggestions forfuture research.

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  • 15.
    Cavric, Marko
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Isebring, Hampus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Design av sekretessmeddelanden: Hur sekretessmeddelanden kan designas för att främja användares förståelse2024Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid growth of connected devices that collect and share data leads to users needing to read and approve an increasing number of privacy notices to use devices and services. Privacy notices are agreements that define the terms of use for a product or service and are intended to inform users about the collection and use of their data and personal information before deciding to accept or decline. Privacy notices tend to be lengthy and contain a lot of text with complicated language. The text in privacy notices is often static without user interaction, which leads to users being faced with a long text to read without any form of support in terms of design elements, such as color, icons, overview, or interactions. The lack of design elements is one of the reasons why users today either overlook or accept privacy notices without understanding the implications, which has consequences for the user's privacy. Because of this, it is of great importance that users have a clear understanding of how their privacy is affected by accepting a privacy notice. The purpose of the study is to increase knowledge in the field and offer and support designers in their approach to how privacy notices can be designed to promote user understanding. The study was conducted through a qualitative design study where an existing framework created for the design of privacy notices was combined with identified design elements from the literature study. The design elements and framework were used in the development of four design proposals, which were implemented in a prototype to investigate how understanding can be promoted in privacy notices. The result of the study is four design proposals that support users in achieving understanding.

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  • 16.
    Cooney, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Robot Art, in the Eye of the Beholder?: Personalized Metaphors Facilitate Communication of Emotions and Creativity2021In: Frontiers in Robotics and AI, E-ISSN 2296-9144, Vol. 8, article id 668986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socially assistive robots are being designed to support people's well-being in contexts such as art therapy where human therapists are scarce, by making art together with people in an appropriate way. A challenge is that various complex and idiosyncratic concepts relating to art, like emotions and creativity, are not yet well understood. Guided by the principles of speculative design, the current article describes the use of a collaborative prototyping approach involving artists and engineers to explore this design space, especially in regard to general and personalized art-making strategies. This led to identifying a goal: to generate representational or abstract art that connects emotionally with people's art and shows creativity. For this, an approach involving personalized "visual metaphors" was proposed, which balances the degree to which a robot's art is influenced by interacting persons. The results of a small user study via a survey provided further insight into people's perceptions: the general design was perceived as intended and appealed; as well, personalization via representational symbols appeared to lead to easier and clearer communication of emotions than via abstract symbols. In closing, the article describes a simplified demo, and discusses future challenges. Thus, the contribution of the current work lies in suggesting how a robot can seek to interact with people in an emotional and creative way through personalized art; thereby, the aim is to stimulate ideation in this promising area and facilitate acceptance of such robots in everyday human environments. © 2021 Cooney. 

  • 17.
    Cooney, Martin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. teraction Science Laboratories (ISL), Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR), Kyoto, Japa.
    Shiomi, Masahiro
    teraction Science Laboratories (ISL), Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR), Kyoto, Japa.
    Kochenborger Duarte, Eduardo
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Vinel, Alexey
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. stitute of Applied Informatics and Formal Description Methods (AIFB), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany.
    A Broad View on Robot Self-Defense: Rapid Scoping Review and Cultural Comparison2023In: Robotics, E-ISSN 2218-6581, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With power comes responsibility: as robots become more advanced and prevalent, the role they will play in human society becomes increasingly important. Given that violence is an important problem, the question emerges if robots could defend people, even if doing so might cause harm to someone. The current study explores the broad context of how people perceive the acceptability of such robot self-defense (RSD) in terms of (1) theory, via a rapid scoping review, and (2) public opinion in two countries. As a result, we summarize and discuss: increasing usage of robots capable of wielding force by law enforcement and military, negativity toward robots, ethics and legal questions (including differences to the well-known trolley problem), control in the presence of potential failures, and practical capabilities that such robots might require. Furthermore, a survey was conducted, indicating that participants accepted the idea of RSD, with some cultural differences. We believe that, while substantial obstacles will need to be overcome to realize RSD, society stands to gain from exploring its possibilities over the longer term, toward supporting human well-being in difficult times. © 2023 by the authors.

  • 18.
    Ebbesson, Esbjörn
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Ihlström Eriksson, Carina
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    A User Driven Design Approach to Creating UGC Services – Challenging the Newspaper Industry2013In: Human Interface and the Management of Information Information and Interaction Design: 15th International Conference, HCI International 2013 Las Vegas, NV, USA, July 2013 Proceedings, Part I / [ed] Sakae Yamamoto, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, Vol. 8147, p. 187-196Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a user driven approach to creating user generated content services together with newspaper representatives and researchers in a Living Lab setting. Two cases are discussed, one with creating city district blogs and one with creating a site for un-employed youth. In each case both situated and distributed design activities were conducted, and the paper discusses the challenges with this approach. As the newspaper industry traditionally designs their services in-house from their own ideas and thereafter tests them with their readers, a user driven approach by readers was very challenging. However, the newspaper representatives also found it rewarding to embrace their ideas. The participating readers were very active in the situated activities but only a few continued the same activity online. The paper concludes by proposing a model for how to view the changing role of a researcher or facilitator in these types of setting. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  • 19.
    Fabricius, Victor
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Exploring Road Traffic Interactions Between Highly Automated Vehicles and Vulnerable Road Users2023Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Understandings of road traffic interactions are largely based on human-human interactions. However, the development of vehicles controlled by highly auto- mated driving systems (ADS) would introduce a radically novel type of road user. This compilation thesis explores encounters between these “autonomous vehicles” (AVs) and human vulnerable road users (VRUs) such as pedestrians and cyclists. The included publications are connected to three research questions. First, empirical studies are reviewed to highlight existing interactive be- haviors and communication cues. This is followed by a methodological question of how to investigate AV-VRU interactions. Finally, VRUs’ experiences from initial experiments on AV crossing encounters are presented.

    While road user trajectories and kinematic behaviors are viewed as primary mechanisms to facilitate traffic interactions, they might also be influenced by cues such as appearances, gestures, eye-gaze, and external human-machine interfaces (eHMI). Using the Wizard-of-Oz approach, we are able to explore VRU encounters with a seemingly highly automated vehicle. Compared to meeting an attentive driver, AV encounters resulted in a reported lower willingness to cross, lower perceived safety, and less calm emotional state, indicating that the absence of driver-centric cues could lead to interaction issues and impede acceptance of AVs. To further explore this, we included light-based eHMI to signal the driving mode and intent of the vehicle (e.g., intent to yield). Future research should continue to investigate how AVs may co-exist with human road users focusing on aspects such as behavioral adaptations, research methodologies, and the role of various eHMI.

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    Licentiate Thesis Summary
  • 20.
    Fabricius, Victor
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Habibovic, Azra
    Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Rizgary, Daban
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Jonas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Interactions Between Heavy Trucks and Vulnerable Road Users – A Systematic Review to Inform the Interactive Capabilities of Highly Automated Trucks2022In: Frontiers in Robotics and AI, E-ISSN 2296-9144, Vol. 9, article id 818019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates interactive behaviors and communication cues of heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) and vulnerable road users (VRUs) such as pedestrians and cyclists as a means of informing the interactive capabilities of highly automated HGVs. Following a general framing of road traffic interaction, we conducted a systematic literature review of empirical HGV-VRU studies found through the databases Scopus, ScienceDirect and TRID. We extracted reports of interactive road user behaviors and communication cues from 19 eligible studies and categorized these into two groups: 1) the associated communication channel/mechanism (e.g., nonverbal behavior), and 2) the type of communication cue (implicit/explicit). We found the following interactive behaviors and communication cues: 1) vehicle-centric (e.g., HGV as a larger vehicle, adapting trajectory, position relative to the VRU, timing of acceleration to pass the VRU, displaying information via human-machine interface), 2) driver-centric (e.g., professional driver, present inside/outside the cabin, eye-gaze behavior), and 3) VRU-centric (e.g., racer cyclist, adapting trajectory, position relative to the HGV, proximity to other VRUs, eye-gaze behavior). These cues are predominantly based on road user trajectories and movements (i.e., kinesics/proxemics nonverbal behavior) forming implicit communication, which indicates that this is the primary mechanism for HGV-VRU interactions. However, there are also reports of more explicit cues such as cyclists waving to say thanks, the use of turning indicators, or new types of external human-machine interfaces (eHMI). Compared to corresponding scenarios with light vehicles, HGV-VRU interaction patterns are to a high extent formed by the HGV’s size, shape and weight. For example, this can cause VRUs to feel less safe, drivers to seek to avoid unnecessary decelerations and accelerations, or lead to strategic behaviors due to larger blind-spots. Based on these findings, it is likely that road user trajectories and kinematic behaviors will form the basis for communication also for highly automated HGV-VRU interaction. However, it might also be beneficial to use additional eHMI to compensate for the loss of more social driver-centric cues or to signal other types of information. While controlled experiments can be used to gather such initial insights, deeper understanding of highly automated HGV-VRU interactions will also require naturalistic studies. © 2022 Fabricius, Habibovic, Rizgary, Andersson and Wärnestål.

  • 21.
    Flodin, Eva
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Interactive Design - The desire for autonomous upright mobility: A longitudinal case study2007In: Technology and Disability, ISSN 1055-4181, E-ISSN 1878-643X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 213-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a child is born with a motor disability, making it difficult or impossible to acquire independent locomotion, a challenging task is to find assistive compensating technology. This study addresses the motor needs of a child, Hanna, with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA II). She participated in the development of her assistive technology, with a focus on her independent locomotion and posture, during her infancy, childhood and early teens in a longitudinal and interactive design project. From the very beginning, she expressed a strong attraction to autonomous upright mobility, in contrast to the more common sitting posture in a wheelchair. She has used different versions of the resulting powered walking aid ever since. The upright independent locomotion it has afforded has been of major importance for her self-image, independence and physical development. © 2007 IOS Press. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Berg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Center for Social Analysis (CESAM).
    Pink, Sarah
    School of Media and Communication/Design Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Capturing the Ordinary: Imagining the User in Designing Automatic Photographic Lifelogging Technologies2016In: Lifelogging: Digital self-tracking and Lifelogging - between disruptive technology and cultural transformation / [ed] Stefan Selke, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2016, p. 111-128Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we discuss how automatic wearable cameras are imagined by their designers. Such technologies have most often been approached from a user perspective, which overlooks how developers invest their personal experiences and emotions into the technologies. Focusing on the Narrative clip - a camera that takes a photo every 30 seconds, we show how developers its developers have imagined this camera as a device that enables people to gain access to the assumed authenticity of a recordable world, that exists externally to the human wearing the device. As this example shows, when we account for developers’ visions and imaginations, particular stories emerge. Thus, we argue it is important to account for these and the agency they might have in the possibilities created by automated technologies. © Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2016

  • 23.
    Fors, Vaike
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Clayton, Australia.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    How do we learn to know a self-driving car?: A pedagogical design anthropology approach to human - technology interaction2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How will autonomous driving (AD) features change how people will relate to, and act in and with cars? To understand these and similar questions, research within human-computer interaction (HCI) is concerned with how people will react and interact with the autonomous driving features while driving a self-driving car, and how these features can be designed to be perceived as both easy to use and useful. In this paper we demonstrate how a pedagogical design anthropological approach can push this agenda further by introducing a way of understanding use of AD that accounts for how technologies become meaningful in the contexts of the mundane everyday life circumstances in which they are actually used. This approach entails understanding use of technology beyond the moment of human-technology interaction, as a process in which experiential ways of knowing take over from rational action, and meaning becomes generated through the ongoing use of technologies in everyday life processes. In the context user experience of AD, this translates into a focus on how people learn to use AD features, and to imagine possible experiences of AD in ways that are situated in the mundane routines of everyday life.

    We will draw on our ethnographic research into everyday life experiences and expectations of AD cars undertaken between 2016-18, to demonstrate how people need these technologies to become part of their everyday lives, and subsequently need to learn to use them in order to accomplish everyday goals.

  • 24.
    Gkouskos, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Linde, Per
    Internet of Things and People Research Center, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Reddy, Anuradha
    Internet of Things and People Research Center, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Where is the interface? – Appropriating Interaction with IoT in the Smart Home2019In: EAI Endorsed Transactions on Creative Technologies, E-ISSN 2409-9708, no 19, article id e2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the proliferation of IoT the home is becoming a “smart” space that provides new opportunities for supporting creative experiences for the user. Adaptable IoT devices offer the possibility for users to appropriate interaction in the home. The objective of this paper is to explore the use of a configurable, placeable, IoT enabled button as a way for users to appropriate interaction with the smart home. The study employs the methods of technology probes, photography, and contextual interviews. Our findings show that our users configured the IoT enabled button to manage automation in the home, to install place-significant shortcuts for relevant smart home features, and to create interaction points for tasks that support the user’s daily routines. We propose that IoT should not only be seen as a way to increase efficiency in the home but also as a vehicle for user-created interaction opportunities that can creatively support rising needs in each user’s daily life. Copyright © 2019 Dimitrios Gkouskos et al., licensed to EAI.

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  • 25.
    Gkouskos, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Division of Interaction Design, Chalmers University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Normark, Carl Jörgen
    Division of Innovation and Design, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Sus
    Division of Interaction Design, Chalmers University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    What Drivers Really Want: Investigating Dimensions in Automobile User Needs2014In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 59-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding what users need, as opposed to what they say they need, can be a challenge. In order to better address users' true needs, two consecutive methods were used in this study: Future Workshops and Repertory Grid Technique. The Future Workshops-where 21 participants designed for two different future scenarios-opened up for inscribing need expressions and possibilities into five futuristic automobile concepts. These concepts were used as a basis for the Repertory Grid, a technique where users compare objects, describing properties that they find to be important or significant. In this study, 78 participants provided 390 constructs of properties, which were refined to 19 dimensions relevant to user needs. Two study measures, Evaluative Ability and Descriptive Richness, indicate which methods to use when exploring the need dimensions further. Finally, the analysis of the constructs and dimensions point towards how three aspects of vehicles and driving are emerging: how novel technology should, or should not, support driving; how the automobile can be seen as something else than just a means of transportation, and how an automobile could be a part of a greater collective of vehicles. © 2014 Gkouskos, Normark & Lundgren.

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  • 26.
    Gkouskos, Dimitrios
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingrid
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Marianne
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Chen, Fang
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Exploring User Experience in the Wild: Facets of the Modern Car2015In: Design, User Experience, and Usability: Interactive Experience Design: Proceedings, Part III / [ed] Aaron Marcus, Heidelberg: Springer, 2015, Vol. 9188, p. 450-461Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiential approaches to technology create opportunities for facilitating a wider range of in-car user experiences, however holistic knowledge regarding experiences that car users find enjoyable is lacking. We present the experiencethemes of the car as a caretaker, the car as a space for relatedness, the car as a space for stimulation, and the car as a space for transition, collected through a holistic study of 16 drivers, using contextual interviews, reflexive photography and the UX curve method. The use of the themes is exemplified through a design example. The experience themes can help designers empathize with users and create design solutions that can support positive in-car experiences, while the methodology used, serves as an example of how user’s experiences with technology can be studied. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

  • 27.
    Guarese, Renan
    et al.
    Institute of Informatics, Federal University of Rio Grande Do sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Nilsson, Emil
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), MPE-lab.
    Andreasson, Björn Pererik
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    MacIel, Anderson
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    A proposal for augmented situated visualization towards EMC testing2020In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings / [ed] Moser T.; Bruckner F., CEUR-WS , 2020, Vol. 2618, p. 12-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Copyright © 2020 for this paper by its authors.In EMC testing, 3D electromagnetic field data often needs to be visually analysed by an expert in order to detect product defects or unwanted interference between multiple devices. In this sense, the present work proposes the use of data visualization techniques allied to an Augmented Reality user interface to provide information that helps professionals to analyse the same data, however spatially situated where it was first measured. Apart from visualizing it, users may also interact with the data to narrow down their search by switching the attributes being displayed, combining them together, applying filters or changing the formatting in which data is presented. The approaches being proposed in this work will ultimately be tested against each other in comparable 2D and 3D interactive visualizations of the same data in a series of usability assessments with users to validate the solutions. The goal is to ultimately expose whether AR can help users to make more accurate decisions, particularly in EMC related tasks.

  • 28.
    Hammarström, Sara
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Wikberg, Jonne
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Gamification - digital design för att motiveralärande.2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Blended learning is becoming more common within university education and the majoritiesof courses today are connected to an online portal. To easily combine teaching in theclassroom with online learning different types of learning management systems (LMS) arebeing used. Even though teachers cannot always put their trust in the students’ intrinsicmotivation and enthusiasm for learning, it is possible to affect the intrinsic motivation withthe help of extrinsic factors. With gamification extrinsic factors are used to create a fun andengaging environment without affecting the credibility of the studies. Gamification meansthat components of game design are used outside the context of gaming. This can lead to anincrease in motivation for the students. To better understand different types of motivationSelf-determination theory (SDT) is used. Based on the gameplay elements identified inscholarly texts this thesis confirms or denies, and complements this with an empirical studybased on a gamified course at university level. The gameplay elements were analyzed withSDT to see how they affected the three intrinsic psychological needs. Based on this, threedesign patterns were created to support developers and administrators of LMS whenforming a gamified course.

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    Gamification - digital design för att motivera lärande.
  • 29.
    Holdaj Petersson, Kalle
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    Thunberg, Martin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    Adaptiva talbaserade system i fordon: Designförslag för att främja user experience2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This bachelor thesis aims to build an understanding how user experience can be promoted in an adaptive speech-based system, which is found in the context of an automobile. Investigating this particular context and system is of importance since the primary task is to drive safely and let the driver focus on driving rather than system. An adaptive system provides the opportunity to make the interaction more effective and a speech-based system lets the driver focus on the traffic environment. By studying relevant theory and by carrying out user tests, with the technique Wizard of Oz, we have drafted design and dialogue recommendations. These recommendations can promote user experience and make the interaction of the system more effective and pleasant.

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    Adaptiva talbaserade system i fordon -Designförslag för att främja user experience
  • 30.
    Husidic, Nadina
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Immersive technology applications in the museum environment: Challenges and opportunities2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Due to digitalization and digital transformation, service-based organizations are looking into how to apply innovative digital technology in their models and processes. In the cultural heritage sector, immersive technology is often adopted to enable the digitalization of the museum experience. Applying immersive technology comes with new challenges and opportunities for museums, and it is, therefore, a strategic decision. Current literature focuses on the impact of immersive museum experiences on visitors, leaving a knowledge gap concerning the internal and external strategic stakeholders’ perspectives. The present work presents an explorative qualitative study of the perceived challenges and opportunities by strategic stakeholders of the Swedish cultural heritage sector. The main outcome of this study is a thematization of the challenges and opportunities. The findings on the challenges of immersive technology application are thematized based on innovation management, design value, and organizational model. The identified themes related to the opportunities regard operational efficiency, social sustainability, and experience design. The outcomes of this study can inform the work of researchers and industry professionals with epistemic, experiential, economic, social, and cultural implications.

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  • 31.
    Hylving, Lena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Lindenfalk, Bertil
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Weberg, Oliver
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Game design as a pedagogical tool for learning and reflection: The case of the ethics experience2022In: Design, Learning, and Innovation: 6th EAI International Conference, DLI 2021, Virtual Event, December 10-11, 2021, Proceedings / [ed] Eva Brooks; Jeanette Sjöberg; Anders Kalsgaard Møller, Cham: Springer, 2022, Vol. 435, p. 86-96Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to present an ongoing pedagogical project where game design is used to let students both learn and reflect upon different perspectives of ethics relevant to the master program they are enrolled in. The paper explains the underlying logic behind the pedagogical process where students develop their own game and at the same time learn about different perspectives of ethics in relation to courses that they are currently taking. With an open and iterative method, we let the students explore, discuss and design a game that can be used by future students. By letting the students decide and lead the development we democratize the learning-process and engage them in a learning experience. More so, this approach to game design as a pedagogical tool to engage and democratize the learning experience is new and increasingly relevant for both students that play games on an everyday basis, but also students that are new to games. Also, it is a constant and dynamic process for both students and teachers. © 2022, ICST Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering.

  • 32.
    Jensen, Tobias
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Benefits & Challenges of Process Plant Digital Twins in Process Industries: A Single Case Study Approach in the Mineral Processing Industry2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Digital Twin is an increasingly trending technology that utilizes many of the key technologies relevant to the digitalization of industries and Industry 4.0, such as AI, Big Data, and IoT, to bring a virtual asset and a physical asset together to perform analysis and execute real-time decision making backed up by data (Grieves & Vickers, 2017; Rasheed et al., 2020). Current research on the benefits and challenges of Digital Twins in process industries is sparse and under-developed, and the significance of Digital Twins in their operational lifecycle phase requires investigation (Perno et al., 2020; Schleich et al., 2019; Sjödin, 2013).

    Research Questions: RQ1: What are the benefits of industrial process plant Digital Twins for companies in process industries? RQ2: What are the challenges that companies will face with industrial process plant Digital Twins in process industries?

    Literature Review: A theoretical framework was developed based on the applications, challenges, and enablers researched in other industries which acted as a foundation for the data collection process.

    Research Method: The thesis follows a qualitative research approach. A single-case study was employed with a large equipment supplier in the mineral processing industry, where data was collected through 17 semi-structured interviews with people possessing in-depth knowledge about the needs of the mineral processing industry.

    Findings: Five main benefits of industrial process plant Digital Twins in process industries were identified, Process performance, Monitoring and control, Predictive maintenance and scheduling, Business opportunities, and Safety. Correspondingly, four main challenges were identified, Perception and presentation, Privacy and security, Data management and performance, and Mutual scope and focus.

    Conclusions: The thesis project's managerial and theoretical implications include providing equipment suppliers in process industries with what benefits there lie with industrial process plant Digital Twins and which challenges must be overcome. By providing these benefits and challenges to equipment suppliers, they can prioritize which of these are most important to consider in their situation. The thesis contributes to the research of Digital Twins and adds to the sparse existing knowledge of what the benefits and challenges are of industrial process plant Digital Twins in process industries. The main limitation is the absence of process plant companies during the data collection phase.

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  • 33.
    Johansson, Mikael
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Söderholm Mullaart, Mattias
    Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Novakazi, Fjollë
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rydström, Annie
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The decline of user experience in transition from automated driving to manual driving2021In: Information, E-ISSN 2078-2489, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated driving technologies are rapidly being developed. However, until vehicles are fully automated, the control of the dynamic driving task will be shifted between the driver and automated driving system. This paper aims to explore how transitions from automated driving to manual driving affect user experience and how that experience correlates to take-over performance. In the study 20 participants experienced using an automated driving system during rush-hour traffic in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA. The automated driving system was available in congested traffic situations and when active, the participants could engage in non-driving related activities. The participants were interviewed afterwards regarding their experience of the transitions. The findings show that most of the participants experienced the transition from automated driving to manual driving as negative. Their user experience seems to be shaped by several reasons that differ in temporality and are derived from different phases during the transition process. The results regarding correlation between participants’ experience and take-over performance are inconclusive, but some trends were identified. The study highlights the need for new design solutions that do not only improve drivers’ take-over performance, but also enhance user experience during take-over requests from automated to manual driving. © 2021 by the authors

  • 34. Levall, Johanna
    Design av digitala lärplattformar för att stödja samhörighet2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Under en lång tid har det rapporterats att distansstudier har ett högt antal studenter som gör studieavhopp. Tidigare forskning har visat att en anledning till att studenter inte fullföljer sin distansutbildning kan vara en brist på social kontakt och därmed en känsla av isolering hos studenten. Ett sätt för lärosäten att minska antalet studieavhopp skulle kunna vara att skapa en känsla av samhörighet för studenten. Spelifiering innebär att spelelement används utanför spelkontexten för att engagera användaren. Social spelifiering kan ses som en undergrupp där spelelement används från sociala spel. Sociala spel bygger på social interaktion och innehåller spelelement där användarna kan interagera med varandra. Denna studie utfördes med en designorienterad forskningsansats där sociala spelelement implementerades i en prototyp för att se hur en känsla av samhörighet kan stödjas. Denna studie resulterade i fyra designförslag för hur digitala lärplattformar kan designas för att stödja en känsla av samhörighet.

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    Design av digitala lärplattformar för att stödja samhörighet
  • 35.
    Lindberg, Susanne
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Gamification for Self-Directed Learning in Higher Education2019In: EDULEARN19 Proceedings, The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2019, p. 1764-1773Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on how gamification was used to promote Self-Directed Learning (SDL) in a course at a Swedish university. SDL is a strategy to lifelong learning [1], and essential in today's fast-changing society. However, it is challenging to achieve in higher education due to an emphasis on extrinsic motivation, and a tradition of the teacher being in control. Gamification is the use of game elements in non-game contexts [2] and has been used in educational contexts to motivate and engage students. Based on six years experience of teaching a gamified course, this paper seeks to answer the question: How can gamification support Self-Directed Learning in higher education?

    Self-directed learners continue to learn after the formal education has ended, which is essential in most professions today. The concept was described by Garrison [1] as having three dimensions: self-management (control), self-monitoring (responsibility) and motivation. This paper focuses on SDL as one perspective on learning, exploring the possibility for using gamification to support SDL.

    The paper reports on the experiences from the past six years of teaching a gamified course for first-year interaction design undergraduate students. A total of 253 students have taken the course, which implements several game elements: points, levels, choice, boss, collaboration, player status, and feedback. The students' experiences have been evaluated in several ways: the university’s standard summative evaluation form, since 2015 also a summative oral evaluation, and during 2016 and 2017 oral evaluations were also performed halfway through the course. The experiences from teaching the course are analysed using the three dimensions of SDL.

    For example, self-management is supported by the use of choice and the transparency of the player status page. In this case, the students were able to strategically choose some of their assignments, based on their level of ambition, through the overview of their current points. Self-monitoring is for example supported by the transparency of the reward structure and frequent external feedback; in this case, the point system and associated profile page.

    Furthermore, the reward structure, levels, choice, bosses, and the overall novelty of the concept supported motivation. The challenge in SDL is to internalise extrinsic motivation [1], and in this case the overall strong grades of the students, and their continued motivation to participate in course activities show that this was at least partly successful. In this case, the challenge was how to balance the game elements in order to achieve SLD, yet still maintain the structure of formal education.

    We formulate four ways in which gamification can support SDL: feedback can support all three dimensions of SDL and is one of the essential game elements in higher education; game elements can be used to direct students towards critical thinking activities, and thus support self-monitoring; choice can be used to support self-management, but is the most difficult to design; and intrinsic motivation can be supported by using appropriate reward structures and frequent feedback. 

    References:

    [1] Garrison, D.R., Self-directed learning: Toward a comprehensive model. Adult education quarterly, 1997. 48(1): p. 18-33.

    [2] Deterding, S. et al. From game design elements to gamefulness: defining gamification. in Proceedings of the 15th international academic MindTrek conference: Envisioning future media environments. 2011.

  • 36.
    Lindberg, Susanne
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE), Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Participatory design workshops with children with cancer: lessons learned2013In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, New York, N.Y.: ACM Press, 2013, p. 332-335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design and development of information technology for use in health services presents a complex and sensitive situation. It includes not only managing differing interests and situations, but does so in a context that might give rise to negative emotions among the participating users. When the future users are children, this design process becomes even more complex. Participatory design is considered suitable for design with children. The premise for the participation of the children in this study was that they were, or had been treated for cancer. Therefore, their participation could awaken negative emotions, and make the situation difficult for them to handle. How participatory design with children can be conducted in such a sensitive context is therefore explored, grounded in the experience from six design workshops. The workshops evolved around the concept of comics as a way to allow the children to express themselves with familiar means. Three main lessons were learned from the workshops: working in pairs promotes an efficient work situation and the possibility to keep an eye on the children's wellbeing; proxies need to be distanced from the participating children; and the scenarios in the comics set the level of realism of the result. Copyright 2013 ACM.

  • 37.
    Lindberg, Susanne
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Schizophrenia and Design: The Expectation Gaps with a Vulnerable User Group2019In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 70-73Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In this forum we celebrate research that helps to successfully bring the benefits of computing technologies to children, older adults, people with disabilities, and other populations that are often ignored in the design of mass-marketed products. --- Juan Pablo Hourcade, Editor

  • 38.
    Lindberg, Susanne
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Wickedness in Design for People Diagnosed with Schizophrenia2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, ISSN 0905-0167, E-ISSN 1901-0990, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 47-77, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the digitisation of society, e-health technology increasingly supports new design situations that extend those traditional to Information Systems, and therefore need to be better understood. In design for complex, new and sensitive design situations, it is not possible to apply known methods and solutions without a deeper situational understanding. These design situations are fraught with wicked problems that are contradictory and complex. This paper intends to answer how the wickedness of the design situation when designing e-health technology for people diagnosed with schizophrenia can be understood and what consequences the design situation has for the design process. The paper presents a grounded theory analysis of stakeholder interviews and focus group interviews with people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Four wicked problems are identified: struggle of dependence, contradiction of social interaction, contradiction of trust and counteracting improvement behaviour. The problems are interrelated and have consequences for the design, acceptance, use and user involvement in design of e-health technology for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. The paper also shows the viability of using grounded theory for studying and describing situational wickedness. © Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, 2018.

  • 39.
    Lindberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Bergquist, Magnus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Nygren, Jens M.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Evaluating Digital Peer Support for Children Cured from Cancer2017In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 664-676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes a case study of the challenges that emerged from a formative evaluation process with the purpose of evaluating a digital peer support (DPS) service for children between 8 and 12 cured from cancer. The evaluation of DPS for children is particularly challenging. While the literature on evaluation with children is extensive, challenges such as risk assessment that become prevalent in the evaluation of DPS are not highlighted. This case study analyzes how the DPS service was evaluated over the course of two usability tests, a two-week diary study, a focus group interview, and a survey. Challenges relating to ethics, trust, risk assessment, and recruitment emerged during the evaluation process. We identify key strategies to handle these challenges: progression, proxies, and reflection. Performing a multistage evaluation process with progressing sensitivity allowed control of some of the complexities of the context in order to balance the degree of the children’s involvement with the degree of sensitivity. © 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 40.
    Lindberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Wärnestål, Pontus
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Man and Information technology laboratory (MI-lab).
    Nygren, Jens
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
    Designing digital peer support for children: design patterns for social interaction2014In: IDC '14 Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Interaction design and children, [S.l.]: ACM Press, 2014, p. 47-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children who have survived a life-threatening disease like cancer benefit from social support from other children with a similar background. However, these children are often geographically dispersed and have little opportunity to meet. We investigate the design and development of Digital Peer Support Services (DPS), which may overcome this problem. Peer support is a kind of social support that brings together peers with similar experiences to help their adjustment to a disease. The aim of this paper is to develop design patterns for social interaction that can be implemented in a DPS for children surviving cancer. We conducted four sets of design workshops with children, from which emerged clusters relating to peer support and friendship that were broken down into triads. From these, six design patterns for social interaction were developed. The patterns delineate different aspects of social interaction for children and are illustrated with examples from DPS prototypes and concepts. The patterns are organized into a hierarchy, comprising the beginning of a design pattern language for social interaction for children. An essential aspect of the patterns is providing users with transparency and control of the extent to which their social interaction is public or private. Copyright © 2014 ACM.

  • 41.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Recharging Future Mobility: Understanding Digital Anticipatory UX through Car Ethnographies2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cars have created many positive experiences for people by providing them freedom of mobility, exciting driving thrills and status in society. However, cars are also known to create problems such as pollution, traffic congestion and accidents. To shift towards a more sustainable way of mobility for the future, we need to understand car users' experiences of today and how these shape their anticipation of future mobility.

    Today users of new cars create their future car using immersive online car configurators, share their anticipation and experiences about the functionality of recent software updates on social media or consider how their future electric car could be charged in a ‘smart’-way through available charging ecosystems. These examples show how digitalisation through new digital technologies extend the ways users anticipate and experience cars as they evolve. These experiences go beyond the moment of in-car interactions, which so far has been the focus for user experience (UX) research and development within academia and industry.

    UX of digitalised cars is no longer mainly about the experiences of in-car driving and entertainment. Instead, digital technologies expand the possibilities for peoples' anticipation and UX of cars to emerge anywhere and anytime, making human anticipation an important aspect of UX to understand. The forward-oriented decision process, which occurs when people's hopes and fears about the future become part of their present actions and decisions, becomes a strong driver for people's decision making. Therefore, it becomes important to understand anticipation in relation to UX of digitalised cars and for how people shape their futures with cars.

    Digitalisation of traditional physical products enables a mix of the digital and physical representations of the product, which adds new challenges in how we can understand and research UX of digitalised cars to include more aspects than in the individual moment of physical use, such as people's experiences of anticipating cars. Consequently, my thesis intends to answer the question: How can experiences of anticipating digitalised cars be understood?

    I have approached the question by studying how digitalisation extends possibilities for UX and anticipation of cars to emerge in everyday life. To investigate the phenomena in everyday settings and follow change over time, a qualitative Design Ethnography (DE) approach was chosen and further developed throughout three different studies. The first study showed experiences of anticipation to be anticipatory, socially constructed, evolving and creating emotional experiences at an online car discussion forum. The second study demonstrated experiences of anticipating autonomous driving (AD) cars to be situated in the social and environmental context, influencing the instant, near and far time spans of people’s anticipation of AD. The third study revealed how electric cars as digital platforms enable people’s anticipation of cars to be related to the surrounding ecosystems. Thus, overall, the thesis consists of five papers that investigate people’s experiences of anticipating digitalised cars from different perspectives.

    This thesis’s main contribution is directed to UX research in the academic field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and the automotive industry. It aims to provide an understanding of how people’s anticipatory experiences of emerging digital technologies related to cars shape new problems and possibilities for future mobility. It concludes that UX research and design needs to be extended to also include aspects of digital representations, evolving functionality and extensions into other ecosystems, which enable the user’s anticipation to emerge and evolve. I have defined this as Digital Anticipatory UX (DAUX), which exposes how people’s anticipation continuously evolves through digi-physical use in the everyday context and creates experience before “use”. By showing a methodological approach to investigate these anticipatory experiences, this thesis also offers a starting point for understanding how people’s evolving hopes and fears can provide insights that implicate the creation of innovative future sustainable mobility solutions with people.

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  • 42.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. UX Vision, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Pink, Sarah
    Emerging Technologies Research Lab, Faculties of Information Technology and Art, Design and Architecture, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Entangled Intelligent Driving: Relations with Automated Cars2022In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 38, no 17, p. 1607-1620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As machines become increasingly intelligent, the HCI community is presented with new challenges regarding methods to capture and understand user experience (UX). In the case of autonomous driving (AD), this involves new scenarios where humans and intelligent vehicles need to act together in real-life traffic situations with other road users. This article responds to this context by 1) outlining a longitudinal design ethnography method whereby participants drove semiautonomous cars in their everyday environments to capture such human-machine relations in real-life settings, 2) demonstrating the complexities of the relations between humans and AD vehicles, 3) engaging theories of socio-materiality and entanglement to understand the human-machine relations of AD cars, and 4) identifying anticipatory experiences that emerge from these relations and their implications for informing UX design. © 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  • 43.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). User Experience Center, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS).
    Pink, Sarah
    Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Osz, Katalin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS). User Experience Center, Volvo Cars, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Anticipatory experience in everyday autonomous driving2020In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 24, p. 747-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss how people’s user experience (UX) of autonomous driving (AD) cars can be understood as a shifting anticipatory experience, as people experience degrees of AD through evolving advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) in their everyday context.We draw on our ethnographic studies of five families, who had access to AD research cars with evolving ADAS features in their everyday lives for a duration of 1ó years. Our analysis shows that people gradually adopt AD cars, through a process that involves anticipating if they can trust them, what the ADAS features will do and what the longer-term technological possibilities will be. It also showed that this anticipatory UX occurs within specific socio-technical and environmental circumstances, which could not be captured easily in experimental settings. The implication is that studying anticipation offers us new insights into how people adopt AD in their everyday commute driving. © 2020, The Author(s).

  • 44.
    Lindgren, Thomas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Cars, UX Vision, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pink, Sarah
    Monash University, Faculty of Information Technology, Melbourne, Australia.
    Fors, Vaike
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Fore-sighting autonomous driving - An Ethnographic approach2021In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 173, article id 121105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing body of Human-Computer-Interaction research and the automotive industry has identified that un- derstanding user needs and creating positive user experience (UX) is crucial in order to successfully introduce Autonomous Driving (AD) vehicles to the market. AD research is commonly undertaken to provide user insights by studying the individual-technology experiences in lab settings or by forecasting attitudes and acceptability through large surveys. However, these approaches base their knowledge on people’s past or present expectations and limited real life experiences of AD. To better understand upcoming individual user needs and to enable new innovations beyond acceptability forecasts and UX lab tests, we need to identify new concepts through alter- native methodologies that can generate user foresights based on users’ evolving anticipations of AD in their everyday lives. We propose an ethnographic approach with iterative speculative scenarios, which we demon- strate through a study undertaken with participants from five families who were introduced to evolving levels of AD, in real-life situations. To demonstrate the methodology, we draw on empirical findings which reveal anticipatory experiences, which we abstract through the concepts of confidence, hope and being-in-the-moment. We show how these concepts structured our user foresights, and outline the implications of engaging them in innovation processes.

  • 45.
    Lundgren, Sus
    et al.
    Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gkouskos, Dimitrios
    Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Escaping the obvious: Skewing properties of interaction2013In: Nordes 2013: Experiments in design research / [ed] Eva Brandt & Pelle Ehn, Nordic Design Research , 2013, p. 32-39Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most design methods used within interaction design originate from other disciplines. As a result, there are few methods which can focus on designing or redesigning interaction in itself. In this paper we present a structured ideation method called Skewing, which is based on changing already identified, interaction-related properties of an artifact. Hereby, designers can generate interesting re-designs whose interaction design differs from the original product. Moreover, the structured approach in Skewing helps in finding the unusual design solutions in the outer rims of the design space. Lastly, Skewing can also be used as a means to teach the materiality of interaction.

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  • 46.
    Maculewicz, Justyna
    et al.
    Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Osz, Katalin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology. Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    UX Research and Sonic Interaction: Towards Human-Centric and Intuitive Sound Interaction Design in the Context of Autonomous Driving2022In: User Experience Design in the Era of Automated Driving / [ed] Andreas Riener; Myounghoon Jeon; Ignacio Alvarez, Cham: Springer Nature, 2022, Vol. 980, p. 335-357Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major challenges of user experience (UX) design in autonomous driving (AD) is to investigate the emerging expectations and needs of future passengers. Working with foresight into future interactions requires interdisciplinary collaboration that enables new modes of working. In our everyday work and throughout the sound interaction design process, we are often challenged by the lack of exploratory methodologies for involving human insights early on in the sound interaction design process. This chapter draws on the interviews with experts in sound design and UX domains, the research project, Sound Interaction for Intelligent Cars (SIIC), as well as daily product development work at the Volvo Car Corporation (VCC) to address this gap. We characterise what we call the classic approach to sound interaction design and outline methodologies used at different stages of the design thinking process for generating and translating UX insights into sonic interaction solutions. By this, we broaden the way of practicing participatory sound UX for AD development and respond to the challenge by incorporating existing exploratory design research methodologies, such as sensory ethnography, soundwalk, co-creation, ideation, and rapid prototyping. © 2022, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

  • 47.
    Mirza, Asif
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    Arshad, Faique Bin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    Performance Analysis of Cyclostationary Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive radio is one of the modern techniques for wireless communication systems to utilize the unused spread spectrum effectively. This novel paradigm makes wireless communication possible with less interference. In our work we have investigated one of the functions of cogni- tive radio called spectrum sensing. We have specifically used the method of Cyclostationary fea- ture detection. Spectrum sensing is also a very effective method to detect spectrum holes and to utilize them. We have implemented spectrum sensing technique in these experiments. A signal is randomly generated which could be Binary shift phase keying (BPSK) or Quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK), then this modulated signal is passed through Additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN), The output signal of AWGN is then passed to cyclostationary detector, various func- tions are pre-implemented inside cyclostationary detector and this includes Fast Fourier trans- form (FFT), Auto correlation, Sliding window to identify that signal. Finally we have demon- strated the results of signal to noise ratio to show the performance evaluation of our experiments. The results have shown a decreasing trend in the probability of incorrect detection by increasing signal to noise ratio.

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    Performance analysis of Cognitive Radio
  • 48.
    O'Keefe, Brian J.
    et al.
    Farmingdale State College, Farmingdale, United States.
    Mastermaker, Michael
    Farmingdale State College, Farmingdale, United States.
    Flint, Tom
    Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Resmini, Andrea
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Chirico, Andrea
    Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Sturdee, Miriam
    University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom.
    Designing Blended Experiences: Laugh Traders2023In: C&C '23: Proceedings of the 15th Conference on Creativity and Cognition, New York, NY: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 116-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital transformation is increasingly blurring the line between what is software and what is the world, requiring designers to harmoniously blend digital and physical products, services and spaces if they want to orchestrate meaningful experiences that are specifically aimed at the interweaving relationships between people, places and things. Traditional approaches to product design, interaction design, and user experience design do not often take this new context into account. The pictorial details the results of a twelve-day workshop focusing on real-world audience and performer problems during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe: it illustrates how two distinct tools, the Blended Experiences Tool and the Evaluation Tool, focusing on the creation of a blended experience and respectively meant to provide a structured way to approach the generative and reflective stages of the design process, can be used to address this gap. This pictorial illustrates the theoretical framing supporting the Blended Experiences Tool; describes how the workshop produced Laugh Traders, a speculative experience centering on attending and reviewing comedy shows; provides a page-by-page pictorial storyboard of the Laugh Trader experience; introduces the Evaluation Tool and applies it to Laugh Trader to measure the relevance, complexity, and attractiveness of the resulting blended experience. Preliminary reflections conclude the pictorial. © 2023 ACM.

  • 49.
    Olsson, Anton
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Jeppsson, Alexander
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Kvarnström, Ebba
    Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science.
    Digitala lärspel i matematikundervisningen: En litteraturstudie om digitala lärspels påverkan på elevernas motivation och lärande2023Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Digitala inslag har idag en stor roll i skolan, men inom matematik klamrar lärare sig fast vid traditionella undervisningsmetoder. Samtidigt tryter motivationen för matematik hos mellanstadieelever. För att öka motivationen inom matematik uppmanas lärare att utgå från elevernas intresse. Undersökningar visar att en stor majoritet av barn i åldrarna 9–12 år spelar digitala spel dagligen. Det finns därmed ett intresse hos eleverna som matematikämnet kan ta vara på. Syftet med denna litteraturstudie är att granska vad forskningen säger kring digitala lärspels påverkan på mellanstadieelevers motivation och lärande inom matematik. Detta för att synliggöra om digitala lärspel har förutsättningar att vara en central del i matematikundervisningen i årskurs 4–6. För att undersöka vad forskning säger inom området genomfördes en litteraturöversikt där sökningarna genererade elva vetenskapliga artiklar. Utifrån dessa artiklar genomfördes en tematisk analys som synliggör att majoriteten av de granskade artiklarna visar att digitala lärspel har en positiv påverkan på elevernas lärande, medan en knapp majoritet visar positivt för elevernas motivation. I vilken utsträckning det digitala lärspelet påverkar elevernas lärande och motivation beror på en rad olika faktorer och samspelet mellan dessa.

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  • 50.
    Perälä, Alexander
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Nyberg, Jonatan
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Designförslag för att övertyga äldre mothållbara transportval2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the negative impact the transport sector has on the climate, the environment, and human health,it is essential to identify alternative transport solutions as well as the need to change travel habits andbehaviors. Sustainability is especially important for the transport solutions of the future, and it is anarea where personal needs and preferences are crucial for the choice of transport. Mobility as a service(MaaS) is an innovative concept with the potential to address the negative impact of the transportsector, and people's personal needs and preferences on mobility, by offering a completely new way oftraveling. Although MaaS has the potential to revolutionize the way we travel, people need to bepersuaded to stop following established travel patterns and instead rely on mobility solutions that aresustainable. The elderly are a population group with established travel habits that have been built upover a long period of time, which creates difficulties in changing towards more sustainable initiatives.Previous research indicates that persuasive design is an effective way to shape, reinforce, or changebehaviors, but that there is limited research on how the design of persuasive technologies can bepersonalized to address the needs and preferences of individuals for mobility.The study aimed to contribute with knowledge of how personalization as a persuasive designstrategycan be designed to convince older people towards sustainable transport choices. The study hasexplored relevant research on persuasive design, personalization, sustainable mobility and olderpeople in order to provide an overview of theoretical starting points to investigate how personalizationdesign can be used to convince older people to choose sustainable transport choices. To answer thequestion, the study used a design-oriented approach with qualitative methods. By designing aprototype based on insights from previous research, three design proposals were developed for howpersonalization can be designed in a mobility service to convince older people to make moresustainable transport choices.

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