hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Profiles of Dual Career Competences of Swedish University Student-Athletes
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5877-7934
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6198-0784
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Health and Sport.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9703-719X
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Combining sport and education (or work) is termed as athletes ‘dual careers’ (DC) and it is an evolving area of research in Europe, guided by the European Union Guidelines on Dual Careers of Athletes (2012). In this presentation, results from a Swedish national study will be presented. The aim of the study was to investigate university student-athletes’ DC competences (i.e., knowledge, skills, experience and attitudes) for a successful DC. The study is part of the European project ‘Gold in Education and Elite Sport’ (GEES) involving eight other European countries. Seventy-one Swedish university student-athletes (mean age= 25.2) representing various sports completed the DC Competence Survey. The survey measured student-athletes’ perceptions (i.e., importance and possession) of 38 DC competences (e.g., ability to prioritize, dedication to succeed, self-discipline, ability to cope with stress), and student-athletes’ experience of, coping with, and use of competences in seven challenging DC scenarios (e.g., missing important days in school, moving away from home, injury). The Latent profile analysis on student-athletes’ possession of competences indicated that the model with a 3-profile solution provided the best fit (entropy = 0.876; Parametric Bootstrapped likelihood ratio test =.01). Profile-1 (P1: n=7) corresponded to student-athletes with an average level of competence; Profile-2 (P2: n=42) to an average-to-good level of competence, and Profile-3 (P3: n=22) to a good competence level. Profile-3 outscored the two other profiles in terms of mean coping with all seven DC scenarios (P1: M=3.39; P2: M=3.58; P3: M=4.15), indicating that the more competences student-athletes possessed the better they coped. However, the pattern of coping between profiles was not consistent across all scenarios, suggesting that some competences were more important for some scenarios and less important for others. Further analysis aims to reveal scenario-specific competences to guide practitioners helping student-athletes in specific DC scenarios.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31946OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-31946DiVA: diva2:963004
Conference
31st Annual Conference of the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), September 28 - October 1, 2016, Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Available from: 2016-09-07 Created: 2016-09-07 Last updated: 2016-10-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Linnér, LukasStambulova, NataliaEkengren, Johan
By organisation
Health and Sport
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 55 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf