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Effects of family disposable income on development of height and BMI from birth up to eight years of age
Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). (CVHI)
Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Section for Epidemiology and Social Medicine (EPSO), Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
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2016 (English)In: European Obesity Summit (EOS) – Joint Congress of EASO and IFSO-EC: ABSTRACTS, Freiburg: S. Karger, 2016, Vol. 9, 44-44 p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Low socioeconomic position (SEP) is a known risk factor for development of obesity in childhood. e level of parental education is commonly used as proxy for SEP, but family disposable income is likely to also be of importance for SEP. e aim of this study was to determine the e ects of family disposable income on BMI and height trajectories from birth up to eight years of age, and the development of obesity at eight years of age.

Methods: Growth data from birth to eight years age were collected for 3030 Swedish children. Register data on family disposable income was re- trieved from Statistics Sweden, and dichotomized for the analysis by the median value for the group. Register-derived information on parental ed- ucation and national background, maternal BMI, age and smoking status were considered as covariates in longitudinal mixed models and regres- sion analyses.

Results: Mean birth weight was lower in families of lower income, 3.51 kg (SD 0.54) vs. 3.60 kg (SD 0.53) for children of higher-income parents, p < 0.0001. By age 5.5 years and 8 years, however, a reversed relation between groups was seen, where the children of lower income families showed signi cantly higher mean BMI. is di erence was no longer sig- ni cant when adjusting for covariates. Considering height, lower income was strongly related to lower height at 5.5 and 8 years, di erences were strengthened a er adjusting for confounders, -0.44 cm (95% CI -0.75,- 0.13) for age 5.5 years and -0.56 cm (95% CI -0.88, -0.23) at 8 years. e OR of obesity at 8 years age was 1.69 (95% CI 1.05–2.7) for the group of low income compared to the group of high income.

Conclusions: Low family disposable income is related to increased risk of childhood obesity at 8 years of age. is could be attributed to a di erent growth pattern compared to children of high income. Our ndings that children of lower family income had lower mean birth weight and dis- played lower height later in childhood suggest that these children might have an unfavourable metabolic pro le and increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Freiburg: S. Karger, 2016. Vol. 9, 44-44 p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31306OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-31306DiVA: diva2:940586
Conference
European obesity summit (EOS 2016), 1-4 June 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2016-06-21 Created: 2016-06-21 Last updated: 2016-06-22Bibliographically approved

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