hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Kinematic Differences Between a Barbell Back Squat Wearing Weightlifting Shoes and Barefoot
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Abstract

Background: The squat is one of the most used exercises in the field of strength and

conditioning. It is included as a core exercise in many sports training programmes to

enhance athletic performance due to its biomechanical and neuromuscular similarities

of a wide range of athletic movements. The barbell squat commonly used by athletes

participating in resistance training and it is generally performed using regular athletic

shoes or specially designed weightlifting shoes. However it is now getting more

common to perform the barbell back squat in barefoot or in barefoot-inspired foot

wear. Weightlifting shoes may be well known to weightlifters but to the noncompetitive

lifters and professional athletes they are in general unfamiliar. It is

believed that the structure of the weightlifting shoe supports proper squat mechanism.

There is however limited scientific data reporting on the use of weightlifting shoes

and therefore, it may be needed to investigate how weightlifting shoes affects the

lower body lifting kinematics in the back squat compared to other conditions. Aim:

The aim of the study was to compare the kinematic differences that appears in the

sagittal plane when performing a barbell back squat wearing weightlifting shoes and

barefoot. Method: Fifteen healthy participants (n=15) completed the study. The study

included the barbell back squat in three sets of three repetitions on 50, 60 and 70% of

the participant’s 1RM. The participants performed the movement in both weightlifting

shoes and barefoot in an order randomly chosen and all movements was recorded with

a digital camera from the sagittal plane. Results: The results showed that the angles

were greater in the weightlifting shoe condition on all percentage. The results showed

that there was no statistical significance in the hip angle at 50% of 1RM (p= 0,370) or

at 70% (p = 0,053) but a statistical significance in the hip angle at 60 % (p = 0,028).

The results showed no statistical significance in the ankle angle at 50% of 1RM (p =

0,997), 60% (p = 0,182) or 70 % (p = 0,332). Conclusion: Findings from this study

did not demonstrate that there was a significant difference between performing a

barbell back squat in weightlifting shoes and barefoot. More research is needed to

investigate and compare more variables in the difference between performing a

barbell back squat wearing weightlifting shoes and barefoot.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. , 15 p.
Keyword [en]
Squat, weightlifting, kinematic, barbell back squat
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Health Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-31201OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-31201DiVA: diva2:937759
Subject / course
Biomedicine Targeting Physical Education
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2016-06-17 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2016-06-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(3007 kB)270 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 3007 kBChecksum SHA-512
4537158d7c943ff4bf3d9c3b44d7d3a9d3de4833199ab574c34cd8f109aed875968810e70c115603ba1d336eb2f31ff9636891516c2261c905186f573821f21e
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
School of Business, Engineering and Science
Medical and Health SciencesHealth SciencesSport and Fitness Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 270 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 54 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf