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Guilt and shame – a semantic concept analysis of two concepts related to palliative care
Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Gotland University College, Visby, Sweden & Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden & Haraldsplass University College, Bergen, Norway.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0017-5188
Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway & Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 4, 787-795 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

Background

The theoretical viewpoint of the study was based on the fundamental motive in caring science; the suffering person and his/her health and life situation, which according to the philosophy of palliative care also includes the next-of-kin. The latter often wish to participate in the care of their loved ones and it is thus important for them to be able to make decisions that can generate a meaningful participation. Unfulfilled obligations or wrong decisions, concerning their dying relative, can result in experiences of guilt and shame in relation to the care of the loved one. A semantic concept analysis can provide a deeper understanding of these concepts and create a deeper insight into what the concepts mean for the individual.

Aim

The aim of the study was to elucidate the meaning of and the distinction between the concepts of guilt and shame.

Methods

Semantic concept analysis based on Koort and Eriksson.

Findings

The findings show that guilt and shame are two separate concepts. Guilt contains meaning dimensions of being the cause of and sin. Shame contains meaning dimensions of something that gives rise to shame and ability to experience shame. The synonyms for each concept do not overlap each other

Conclusion

The semantic analysis creates an understanding of the concepts ontologically and provides a basis for theoretical, contextual and clinical understanding and development. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell , 2012. Vol. 26, no 4, 787-795 p.
Keyword [en]
semantic concept analysis, guilt, shame, palliative care
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-30463DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.00992.xISI: 000310791200020PubMedID: 22536856Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84869082351OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-30463DiVA: diva2:908716
Note

Funding: the Johanniterorden in Sweden

Available from: 2013-01-21 Created: 2016-03-03 Last updated: 2016-03-07Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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