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Self-advocacy in Sweden - impact on identity and social relations
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2636-7452
Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group. Living with Disability Research Centre, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7519-6488
2015 (English)Conference paper, Abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Aim: In recent years an increased number of adults with intellectual disability in Sweden have been organized in self-advocacy groups since they no longer accept the perceived subordinate role as a disabled person in society. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of the importance of being a member in a self-advocacy group and what impact it had on the members' daily life, relationships, self-determination and identity.

Method: An interpretative approach was used to analyze data from interviews with 26 participants in four different groups. The semi-structured interviews were supplemented with eight interviews conducted with support workers, focus-group interviews, observations during meetings and document reviews.

Findings: The findings suggest that the participants' engagement in a self-advocacy group is meaningful in several but varies ways. An improved life-situation consisting of strengthened control in every-day life and increased self-confidence are of great importance, but equally important is the perceived possibility to help others and make a difference in their lives. Self-advocacy is primarily understood in terms of achieved independence and social connections within the group, but also as influencing outsiders' attitudes.

Conclusions: The self-advocacy movements indicate a significant change in society and are important for the target group as well as for shaping future support and treatment. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015.
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29984OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-29984DiVA: diva2:878402
Conference
Making it real together: 50th annual ASID Conference, ASID , 2015, Melbourne, Australia
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf