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Dynamics and Stabilization of the Human Gut Microbiome during the First Year of Life
The Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Section for Metabolic Receptology and Enteroendocrinology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4871-8818
Department of Pediatrics, Hallands Hospital Halmstad, Halmstad, Sweden & Göteborg Paediatric Growth Research Center, Department of Paediatrics, the University of Gothenburg, Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7269-648X
BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China &Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
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2015 (English)In: Cell Host and Microbe, ISSN 1931-3128, E-ISSN 1934-6069, Vol. 17, no 5, 690-703 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The gut microbiota is central to human health, but its establishment in early life has not been quantitatively and functionally examined. Applying metagenomic analysis on fecal samples from a large cohort of Swedish infants and their mothers, we characterized the gut microbiome during the first year of life and assessed the impact of mode of delivery and feeding on its establishment. In contrast to vaginally delivered infants, the gut microbiota of infants delivered by C-section showed significantly less resemblance to their mothers. Nutrition had a major impact on early microbiota composition and function, with cessation of breast-feeding, rather than introduction of solid food, being required for maturation into an adult-like microbiota. Microbiota composition and ecological network had distinctive features at each sampled stage, in accordance with functional maturation of the microbiome. Our findings establish a framework for understanding the interplay between the gut microbiome and the human body in early life. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cell Press , 2015. Vol. 17, no 5, 690-703 p.
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29962DOI: 10.1016/j.chom.2015.04.004ISI: 000356101500020PubMedID: 25974306Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84929297936OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-29962DiVA: diva2:877779
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research CouncilNovo Nordisk
Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2016-03-31Bibliographically approved

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Bäckhed, FredrikRoswall, JosefineKotowska, DorotaBergman, StefanMadsen, LiseKristiansen, KarstenDahlgren, Jovanna
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