hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Swedish junior athletes’ personal profiles in relation to the dynamics of adjustment in the junior-to-senior transition
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6198-0784
2015 (English)In: Book of Abstracts of the 20th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science – 24th - 27th June 2015, Malmö – Sweden / [ed] A. Radmann, S. Hedemborg & E. Tsolakidis, Malmö: European College of Sport Science (ECSS) , 2015, p. 295-295Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

According to previous research, the junior-to-senior transition (JST) is decisive for athletes who want to reach the elite/professional sport level, it lasts for 2-4 years, and is known for its high dropout rate. The longitudinal study of the junior-to-senior transition process in Swedish club-based athletes conducted by the authors involved several lines of data analysis with this presentation focusing on the dynamics of athletes’ junior-to-senior transition adjustment in relation to their personal characteristics. The study had five measurements conducted every six months using several instruments; these instruments measured the athletes’ level of athletic identity, task- and ego orientation, self-esteem and adjustment in the transition process. The latent profile analysis identified three profiles (based on athletes personal characteristics; BIC = 771.11; entropy = 0.87; Parametric Bootstrapped likelihood ratio test = -356.07, p < 0.001). In the profile-1, athletes (34 males and 11 females) were characterized by high athletic identity, self-esteem, task orientation, and the JST motivation; they also had moderately high ego orientation. These athletes perceived to be 72 % adjusted at the first measurement, had a positive progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived to be 83 % adjusted at the senior level. In the profile-2, athletes (30 males and 7 females) perceived themselves to have high self-esteem and the JST motivation, relatively high athletic identity and task orientation complemented by moderate ego orientation. They perceived themselves to be 66 % adjusted at the first measurement, had a positive progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived themselves to be 73% adjusted. In the profile-3 athletes (9 males and 9 females) reported high self-esteem, relatively high task orientation, as well as moderate athletic identity, ego orientation and the JST motivation. These athletes perceived to be 62 % adjusted at the first measurement, had almost no progression through the transition process, and at the fifth measurement perceived themselves to be 64 % adjusted. These findings supported our hypothesis that athletes with different profiles of personal characteristics follow different pathways through the JST process. The JST pathways are going to be explored more in detail with the aim to understand transition variables contributing to the dynamics of perceived adjustment. Further this knowledge can be used in assisting athletes in the JST.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: European College of Sport Science (ECSS) , 2015. p. 295-295
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-29933ISBN: 978-91-7104-567-6 OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-29933DiVA, id: diva2:877654
Conference
The 20th Annual Congress of European College of Sport Science, Malmö, Sweden, 24th-27th June, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-07 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Book of Abstracts

Authority records BETA

Franck, AlinaStambulova, Natalia

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Franck, AlinaStambulova, Natalia
By organisation
Sport Health and Physical activity
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 158 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf