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A methodology of loving kindness: how interpersonal neurobiology, compassion, and transference can inform researcher–participant encounters and storytelling
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), Sport Health and Physical activity.
2016 (English)In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 8, no 1, 1-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article concerns some central aspects of methodology in qualitative research: the participants’ and investigators’ storytelling, and the main instruments in many interview-based qualitative studies, the researchers themselves. We discuss several ethical and interpersonal aspects of qualitative research encounters between investigators and their interviewee participants. Interviewing research participants is a fundamentally exploitative process, and we make suggestions for how we can temper that exploitation by giving something of value back to our participants and to make sure the well-being of the participant is not compromised by our actions. Many research topics in qualitative studies concern experiences of stress, distress and trauma, and interviewees re-telling their stories may become retraumatised. Such retraumatisation constitutes abuse on the part of the researcher. To counter potential abuse and exploitation, we discuss how researchers, as the central instruments in interview-based investigations, can use knowledge of interpersonal neurobiology, psychodynamic theory and mindful practice to enable them to hold their participants (and their participants’ stories) in loving care and maybe even help in healing processes. © 2015 Taylor & Francis

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2016. Vol. 8, no 1, 1-20 p.
Keyword [en]
ethical research, interviewing, mindful researcher, presence, storying
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-28359DOI: 10.1080/2159676X.2015.1056827Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84933575063OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-28359DiVA: diva2:815260
Note

A substantial portion of this article was presented as an Invited Keynote Speech by the first author at the 4th International Conference on Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise, Loughborough, England, 1–3 September 2014. Only an abstract was published in the conference proceedings.

Available from: 2015-05-29 Created: 2015-05-29 Last updated: 2015-11-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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