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Mechanisms regulating abundance of submerged vegetation in shallow eutrophic lakes
Limnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5181-0391
Limnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
Limnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
1997 (English)In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 109, no 4, 592-599 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Shallow eutrophic lakes tend to be either in a turbid state dominated by phytoplankton or in a clear-water state dominated by submerged macrovegetation. Recent studies suggest that the low water turbidity in the clear-water state is maintained through direct and in-direct effects of the submerged vegetation. This study examined what mechanisms may cause a recession of the submerged vegetation in the clear-water state, and thereby a switch to the turbid state. The spatial distribution of submerged vegetation biomass was investigated in two shallow eutrophic lakes in the clear-water state in southern Sweden. Biomass of submerged vegetation was positively correlated with water depth and wave exposure, which also were mutually correlated, suggesting that mechanisms hampering submerged vegetation were strongest at shallow and/or sheltered locations. The growth of Myriophyllum spicatum, planted in the same substrate and at the same water depth, was compared between sheltered and wave exposed sites in two lakes. After 6 weeks the plants were significantly smaller at the sheltered sites, where periphyton production was about 5 times higher than at the exposed sites. Exclosure experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of waterfowl grazing on macrophyte biomass. Potamogeton pectinatus growth was decreased by grazing, whereas M. spicatum was not affected. The effects were greater at a sheltered than at a wave-exposed site, and also negatively related to distance from the reed belt. These results suggest that competition from epiphytes and waterfowl grazing hamper the development of submerged vegetation at sheltered and/or shallow locations. An increased strength of these mechanisms may cause a recession of submerged vegetation in shallow eutrophic lakes in the clear-water state and thereby a switch to the turbid state.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg,Germany: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 1997. Vol. 109, no 4, 592-599 p.
Keyword [en]
Alternative stable states, Grazing, Periphyton, Submerged macrophytes, Wave exposure
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-27658DOI: 10.1007/s004420050121ISI: A1997WM37800014Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0030618120OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-27658DiVA: diva2:784959
Available from: 2015-02-01 Created: 2015-02-01 Last updated: 2017-06-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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