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Nitrogen removal in a wastewater reservoir: The importance of denitrification by epiphytic biofilms on submersed vegetation
Limnology, Department of Ecology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Limnology, Department of Ecology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5181-0391
1997 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Quality, ISSN 0047-2425, E-ISSN 1537-2537, Vol. 26, no 3, 905-910 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to examine the importance of epiphytic denitrifying bacteria on submersed vegetation in removing N from a shallow nutrient-enriched freshwater ecosystem. The investigation was conducted during the summer of 1994 in a surface now reservoir receiving municipal tertiary-treated wastewater. The submersed vegetation in the reservoir was dominated by Potamogeton pectinatus L. and filamentous green algae (FGA). The N loading was 2300 mg N h(-1) m(-2) and the N removal, calculated as the mean difference between influent and effluent N, was 190 mg N h(-1) m(-2) (8%). The majority of influent N consisted of NH4+, but the main part of the N removal was due to the removal of NO3- whereas no net retention of NH4+ was found. Mean total soluble solids and BOD7 retention was 69 and 38%, respectively, Denitrification measurements were conducted in darkness at in situ temperature in microcosms with P. pectinatus, FGA, or infect sediment cores. Epiphytic denitrification ranged between 0.21 to 7.0 mg N h(-1) m(-2) reservoir surface area depending on the abundance of the submersed vegetation (5-140 g DW m(-2)). Sediment denitrification was 4.7 mg N h(-1) m-L reservoir surface area. The mean assimilative N uptake of the submersed vegetation and epiphyton was 3.4 and 1.6 mg N h(-1) m(-2) reservoir surface area, respectively. Measured N removal rates through plant uptake and denitrification could only account for a minor part of the N removal observed by mass balance. However, microcosm denitrification measurements underestimate actual denitrification. Thus, the major part of the N removal was most likely due to denitrification. In conclusion, this study indicates that denitrification in epiphytic microbial communities on submersed vegetation can be of significant importance for the N removal in nutrient-enriched freshwater ecosystems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Madison, United States: American Society of Agronomy , 1997. Vol. 26, no 3, 905-910 p.
Keyword [en]
Epiphytic biofilms, Filamentous green algae, Mass balance, Microcosms, Potamogeton pectinatus, Submersed vegetation
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-27656ISI: A1997WZ34900050Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0031148703OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-27656DiVA: diva2:784958
Available from: 2015-02-01 Created: 2015-02-01 Last updated: 2016-02-24Bibliographically approved

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