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Importance of Touch for Conveying Affection in a Multimodal Interaction with a Small Humanoid Robot
Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratory, Advanced Telecommunications, Research Institute International (ATR), 2-2-2 Hikaridai, Keihanna Science City, Kyoto 619-0288, Japan & Department of Systems Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, Japan.
Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratory, Advanced Telecommunications, Research Institute International (ATR), 2-2-2 Hikaridai, Keihanna Science City, Kyoto, Japan.
Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratory, Advanced Telecommunications, Research Institute International (ATR), 2-2-2 Hikaridai, Keihanna Science City, Kyoto 619-0288, Japan Department of Systems Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, Japan.
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Humanoid Robotics, ISSN 0219-8436, Vol. 12, no 1, 1550002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To be accepted as a part of our everyday lives, companion robots will require the capability to communicate socially, recognizing people's behavior and responding appropriately. In particular, we hypothesized that a humanoid robot should be able to recognize affectionate touches conveying liking or dislike because (a) a humanoid form elicits expectations of a high degree of social intelligence, (b) touch behavior plays a fundamental and crucial role in human bonding, and (c) robotic responses providing affection could contribute to people's quality of life. The hypothesis that people will seek to affectionately touch a robot needed to be verified because robots are typically not soft or warm like humans, and people can communicate through various other modalities such as vision and sound. The main challenge faced was that people's social norms are highly complex, involving behavior in multiple channels. To deal with this challenge, we adopted an approach in which we analyzed free interactions and also asked participants to rate short video-clips depicting human–robot interaction. As a result, we verified that touch plays an important part in the communication of affection from a person to a humanoid robot considered capable of recognizing cues in touch, vision, and sound. Our results suggest that designers of affectionate interactions with a humanoid robot should not ignore the fundamental modality of touch.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Singapore: World Scientific, 2015. Vol. 12, no 1, 1550002
Keyword [en]
Affection, humanoid robot, touch; multimodal, human–robot interaction
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-27442DOI: 10.1142/S0219843615500024ISI: 000351225400002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84928501145OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-27442DiVA: diva2:777609
Available from: 2015-01-08 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2016-11-24Bibliographically approved

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