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Popular Science Writing to Support Students’ Learning of Science and Scientific Literacy
Faculty of Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Halmstad University, School of Education, Humanities and Social Science, Research on Education and Learning within the Department of Teacher Education (FULL).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5283-7038
2016 (English)In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 46, no 3, 439-456 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In higher natural science education, the scientific report is the prevailing genre of writing. Despite the fact that communicative skills are highly valued in working life, earlier studies have shown deficiencies among science students. In this paper, we highlight the need for varied communication training, in particularly arguing for the possibilities that students’ popular science writing offers. Our study was based on a questionnaire answered by 64 degree project students in biology. The questions focused on the students’ own experiences of writing about their projects for the general public and what contribution the writing made to their learning of science. A vast majority of the students expressed that the writing helped change their perspectives and that they saw their subject and project in a different light. Many of the students described that the popular science writing made it easier for them to put the science content in a context, to better understand the aim of their own work, and the implications of their findings. We discuss the positive effects that popular science writing may have on students’ subject matter understanding and development of scientific literacy. Our concluding remark is that popular sciencewriting is a useful tool for reflection and that it adds significant value to the students’ capacity to change perspectives, understand their subject and develop scientific literacy. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2016. Vol. 46, no 3, 439-456 p.
Keyword [en]
biology, higher education, popular science writing, science, scientific literacy, writing-to-learn, writing skills
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-27342DOI: 10.1007/s11165-015-9465-yScopus ID: 2-s2.0-84934782955OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-27342DiVA: diva2:774419
Available from: 2014-12-22 Created: 2014-12-22 Last updated: 2017-07-20Bibliographically approved

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Nilsson, Pernilla
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf