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Achieving low return temperature from district heating substations
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Energiteknik.
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Energiteknik.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9069-0807
2014 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 136, 59-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

District heating systems contribute with low primary energy supply in the energy system by providing heat from heat assets like combined heat and power, waste incineration, geothermal heat, wood waste, and industrial excess heat. These heat assets would otherwise be wasted or not used. Still, there are several reasons to use these assets as efficiently as possible, i.e., ability to compete, further reduced use of primary energy resources, and less environmental impact. Low supply and return temperatures in the distribution networks are important operational factors for obtaining an efficient district heating system. In order to achieve low return temperatures, customer substations and secondary heating systems must perform without temperature faults. In future fourth generation district heating systems, lower distribution temperatures will be required. To be able to have well-performing substations and customer secondary systems, continuous commissioning will be necessary to be able to detect temperature faults without any delays. It is also of great importance to be able to have quality control of eliminated faults. Automatic meter reading systems, recently introduced into district heating systems, have paved the way for developing new methods to be used in continuous commissioning of substations. This paper presents a novel method using the temperature difference signature for temperature difference fault detection and quality assurance of eliminated faults. Annual hourly datasets from 140 substations have been analysed for temperature difference faults. From these 140 substations, 14 were identified with temperature difference appearing or eliminated during the analysed year. Nine appeared during the year, indicating an annual temperature difference fault frequency of more than 6%. © 2014 The Authors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kidlington: Pergamon Press, 2014. Vol. 136, 59-67 p.
Keyword [en]
District heating, Temperature difference, Low return temperature, Low supply temperature, Hourly meter reading, Fault detection
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-26881DOI: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.09.022ISI: 000345725800008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84907790387OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-26881DiVA: diva2:758176
Note

This work was financially supported by Fjärrsyn, the Swedish district heating research programme, and Öresundskraft, by providing meter readings from 140 substations.

Available from: 2014-10-24 Created: 2014-10-24 Last updated: 2017-03-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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