hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Aspects of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM): conceptual framework and empirical example
Oslo School of Management, Oslo, Norway.
2007 (English)In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 262-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

– The objective of this paper is to describe and illustrate aspects of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM).

Design/methodology/approach

– The terms of first‐, second‐ and n‐order supply chains are introduced. A first‐order supply chain denotes that a substantial part of it is based on the use of non‐renewable and non‐recycled resources, while the following n‐order ones (e.g. second‐order) are based on a larger share of renewable and/or recycled resources. The conceptual discussion goes across industries, but the empirical example is limited to the clothing industry.

Findings

– One aspect addressed is that first‐order supply chains of brand new clothing go beyond the traditional point of consumption. Another aspect raised is that second‐ and n‐order supply chains should be considered in business practices from the point of origin in the first‐order supply chains in order to enhance corporate efforts of SSCM.

Research limitations/implications

– The dilemma with most of the current research and literature in the field of SCM is that they overlook the connection between first‐, second‐ and n‐order supply chains. The author argues that it is not enough to simply match the supply and demand between the points of consumption and origin in first‐order supply chains in efforts of SSCM, but that an explicit extension of the boundaries towards second‐ and n‐order supply chains will be necessary in the future.

Practical implications

– The scarce non‐renewable resources that businesses are confronted with nowadays, and the increasing scarcity of these resources in the future, will strengthen the need to search for renewable and recycled resources from other first‐, second‐ and n‐order supply chains in order to address genuine aspects of SSCM.

Originality/value

– The author contends that the aspects of SSCM described and illustrated in this paper make a contribution to theory, and assist in expanding the boundaries of theory in SCM. The author also launches a quest for further conceptual descriptions and empirical illustrations to develop theoretical frameworks of SSCM.

© Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2007. Vol. 12, no 4, p. 262-266
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-26782DOI: 10.1108/13598540710759781ISI: 000247927400005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-34250309671OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-26782DiVA, id: diva2:755710
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Svensson, Göran

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Svensson, Göran
In the same journal
Supply chain management
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 94 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf