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The effect of reminders in a web-based intervention study
Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, T2, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4144-4877
Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, T2, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, T2, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6816-7577
2012 (English)In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 27, no 5, 333-340 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knowledge on effective strategies to encourage participation in epidemiological web-based research is scant. We studied the effects of reminders on overall participation. 3,876 employees were e-mailed a baseline web-based lifestyle questionnaire. Nine months later, a follow-up questionnaire was sent. To encourage study participation, 4–5 and 11 e-mail reminders were sent at baseline and follow-up, respectively. Additional reminders (media articles, flyers, SMS etc) were also administered. Reminders (e-mails + additional) were given in low (≤6 reminders), medium (7–9 reminders) or high amounts (>9 reminders). Participation was examined with respect to participant characteristics (i.e. age, sex, Body Mass Index, occupation), type/number of reminders, and time of participation. Most participants were males, 35–49 years, and field workers (non-office based). About 29 % responded before any e-mail reminder, following 26 and 45 % after 1 respective ≥ 2 e-mail reminders. Participant characteristics were not related to when the participants responded. The 4–5 e-mail reminders increased total response rate by 15 %, the eleven by 21 % (greatest increases in September). Those receiving medium amounts of reminders (reference) had the highest response rate (75 %), likewise office workers (54 %) compared to field workers (33 %). High amounts of reminders were particularly effective on office workers. The participants’ characteristics were not related to when they responded in this web-based study. Frequent reminders were effective on response rates, especially for those with high Internet availability. The highest increases in response rates were found in September. © The Author(s) 2012.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2012. Vol. 27, no 5, 333-340 p.
Keyword [en]
Epidemiology, Internet, Intervention, Participation rate, Reminders
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-25253DOI: 10.1007/s10654-012-9687-5ISI: 000305219800002PubMedID: 22531973Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84863724849OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-25253DiVA: diva2:715127
Note

This research was financially supported by Banverket’s research fund, Sweden.

Available from: 2014-04-30 Created: 2014-04-30 Last updated: 2015-03-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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