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Milk cereal drink increases BMI risk at 12 and 18 months, but formula does not
Child Health Care Unit, Region Halland, Halmstad, Sweden & Department of Paediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Department of Paediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Department of Paediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden & Department of Paediatrics, Halland Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Research and Development Centre, Spenshult Hospital, Oskarström, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6294-538X
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2013 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 12, p. 1174-1179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: Infant feeding affects growth, obesity and life-long health. This study examined the impact of dietary patterns on body mass index (BMI) at 12 and 18 months.

METHODS: We followed a cohort of 2,666 children recruited in 2007-2008. Feeding practices were obtained from parental questionnaires and anthropometric data collected by child health nurses.

RESULTS: At six months, 58.3% of the infant were breastfed, but only 1.6% exclusively. Many had begun eating solids (91.8%), porridge (87.7%) or milk cereal drink (46.6%). Bottle-feeding at four months was not a risk factor for a high BMI (>1 SD) at 12 or 18 months. Milk cereal drink at six months increased the risk of a high BMI at 12 and 18 months respectively (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.12-2.22, and 1.52, 1.07-2.17). Milk cereal drink use was increased by low parental education and maternal obesity and reduced by troubled sleep and parental group participation.

CONCLUSION: Formula at four months did not predict a high BMI at 12 or 18 months. Milk cereal drink use at six months was a risk factor for a high BMI at 12 and 18 months. The choice of milk cereal drink was influenced by parental factors, especially educational levels. ©2013 Foundation Acta Pædiatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013. Vol. 102, no 12, p. 1174-1179
Keywords [en]
BMI, Breastfeeding, Feeding patterns, Infant, Milk cereal drink, Overweight
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-25090DOI: 10.1111/apa.12418ISI: 000330040100026PubMedID: 24028671Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84887431251OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-25090DiVA, id: diva2:712830
Note

This study was supported by a grant from the Research and Development Department, Halland, Sweden.

Available from: 2014-04-16 Created: 2014-04-16 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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