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Biochemical detection for direct bead surface analysis
Division of Analytical Chemistry, Leiden/Amsterdam Center for Drug Research, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Division of Analytical Chemistry, Leiden/Amsterdam Center for Drug Research, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Division of Analytical Chemistry, Leiden/Amsterdam Center for Drug Research, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Division of Analytical Chemistry, Leiden/Amsterdam Center for Drug Research, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.
1997 (English)In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 69, no 23, 4878-4884 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A continuous-now biochemical detection system is presented which recognizes biologically active compounds immobilized to solid phases. This approach can be used to screen, for example, solid-phase combinatorial libraries for lead compounds. Biochemical detection is performed by mixing a plug of a solid-phase suspension with labeled affinity protein, During a short reaction time, the labeled affinity protein will only bind to ligands, i.e., compounds with biological activity. Hereafter, the free and bound labels are separated by means of a hollow fiber module, Quantitation of the free label is performed with a conventional now-through fluorescence detector, Total assay time amounts to less than 3 min. Biochemical detection for direct bead surface analysis was developed for two model systems. The first model system used fluorescence-labeled avidin as affinity protein and its ligands biotin and iminobiotin immobilized to agarose as analytes. The second model system used fluorescence-labeled antisheep (Fab)(2) fragments as affinity protein and different IgGs immobilized to agarose as analytes. The feasibility of this approach for recognition of solid-phase immobilized ligands was documented by screening 50 samples with a 100% hit rate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington: American Chemical Society (ACS), 1997. Vol. 69, no 23, 4878-4884 p.
Keyword [en]
synthetic peptide library, combinatorial libraries, discovery, generation, SH2
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-24126DOI: 10.1021/ac970485iISI: A1997YJ91300026PubMedID: 21639159Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0000678319OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-24126DiVA: diva2:679529
Available from: 2013-12-16 Created: 2013-12-09 Last updated: 2015-03-03Bibliographically approved

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