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Leaching of contaminants from untreated pine bark in a batch study: Chemical analysis and ecotoxicological evaluation
School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden. (MERO)
Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hållbar samhälls- och teknikutveckling. (MERO)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3311-9465
Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hållbar samhälls- och teknikutveckling. (MERO)
Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hållbar samhälls- och teknikutveckling. (MERO)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0553-7918
2009 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 163, no 2-3, p. 1096-1100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low cost sorbents have been widely studied in recent years in the search for filter materials that retain contaminants from water. One promising, low cost material is pine bark, a by-product from the forest industry. Many studies have shown that pine bark has great potential for the treatment of metals and organic substances, as a replacement for other commercial sorbents such as active carbon. However, some potential problems are introduced through the use of natural materials and by-products. One such problem that must be addressed is the possibility of leaching of contaminants from the filter material, especially in the initial filtration step or during flushes of lightly contaminated water, e.g. during rainfall for on-site treatment of storm water or landfill leachate. The aim of this preliminary study was therefore to identify potential risks and limitations of using pine bark as a filter material. Leachate from a standardized batch test was analysed for metals, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenols. In addition to these chemical analyses, an ecotoxicological test was conducted using the test organism Daphnia magna. The results showed significant leaching of DOC and some metals. Only a small fraction of the DOC was present as phenols. The leachate was however found to be toxic to the test organism without pH adjustment, and the EC50 was established at an approximate leachate concentration of 40%. This was concluded to be related to the low pH in the eluate, since no toxicity was observed after pH adjustment before the toxicity tests. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2009. Vol. 163, no 2-3, p. 1096-1100
Keywords [en]
Phenols, Heavy metals, DOC, Desorption, Water treatment
National Category
Natural Sciences Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-23573DOI: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2008.07.063ISI: 000264160000082PubMedID: 18757135Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-59849105483OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-23573DiVA, id: diva2:652958
Available from: 2008-10-03 Created: 2013-09-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Nehrenheim, EmmaWaara, Sylvia

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