hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The genetic effects (mtDNA COI) of the invasive Anax imperator on the native Aeshna grandis from populations in southern Sweden
Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
2013 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Climate change will increase the range of some species, including Anax imperator which first was observed in Sweden in the year 2000 and are now observed annually in the region of Scania (Skåne) and other parts of southern Sweden. Aeshna grandis is a common dragonfly from south to north of Sweden and at some places they now share the habitat with A. imperator. The changing climate will benefit A. imperator and the species will spread north in Sweden. How this will affect the native A. grandis is not yet known however this study may reveal some light on the subject. By extracting mtDNA from larvae of A. grandis from 16 different sites; 8 sites with observations of A. imperator and 8 without, it is possible to reveal if there is a genetic difference between locals within the invasive species range and outside it. This study have used the COI region in mtDNA in A. grandis larvae to reveal if the haplotypes in populations that inhabits same habitats as A. imperator are negatively affected or, contrary to different sources, they are able to co-exist. The mtDNA were sequenced, MEGA version 5 was used to construct phylogenetic trees and the program TCS was used to estimate the gene genealogies. In this study there was no correlation between habitats within A. imperator range and outside of its range, however it is interesting that the tree constructed in MEGA divides the larvae in two groups and the graph in TCS also divides the larvae into two groups. This could still be an effect of climate change; it could be the result of A. grandis from Europe immigrating to Sweden. Another hypothesis is two kinds of larvae: one fast-growing larvae which has already adapted to the rising temperatures and have a shorter larva-stage and one slower growing, not yet adapted to temperatures. It could also be a result of an ongoing sympatric speciation however further studies are required to investigate the two types and more importantly, the cause of the two types of larvae.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. , 33 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-23563OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-23563DiVA: diva2:648624
Subject / course
Biology
Presentation
2013-06-05, O125, Kristian IV:s väg 3, Halmstad, 16:14 (Swedish)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2013-09-17 Created: 2013-09-16 Last updated: 2013-09-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

By organisation
School of Business and Engineering (SET)
Natural SciencesOther Biological Topics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 72 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf