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The validity of obesity based on self-reported weight and height: Implications for population studies
Skaraborg Institute, Skövde, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4218-4499
Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden.
Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden.
Skaraborg Institute, Skövde, Sweden.
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2007 (English)In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, Vol. 15, no 1, 197-208 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To validate self-reported information on weight and height in an adult population and to find a useful algorithm to assess the prevalence of obesity based on self-reported information. Research Methods and Procedures: This was a crosssectional survey consisting of 1703 participants (860 men and 843 women, 30 to 75 years old) conducted in the community of Vara, Sweden, from 2001 to 2003. Self-reported weight, height, and corresponding BMI were compared with measured data. Obesity was defined as measured BMI >= 30 kg/m(2). Information on education, self-rated health, smoking habits, and physical activity during leisure time was collected by a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Mean differences between measured and self-reported weight were 1.6 kg (95% confidence interval, 1.4; 1.8) in men and 1.8 kg (1.6; 2.0) in women (measured higher), whereas corresponding differences in height were -0.3 cm (-0.5; -0.2) in men and -0.4 cm (-0.5; -0.2) in women (measured lower). Age and body size were important factors for misreporting height, weight, and BMI in both men and women. Obesity (measured) was found in 156 men (19%) and 184 women (25%) and with self-reported data in 114 men (14%) and 153 women (20%). For self-reported data, the sensitivity of obesity was 70% in men and 82% in women, and when adjusted for corrected self-reported data and age, it increased to 81 % and 90%, whereas the specificity decreased from 99% in both sexes to 97% in men and 98% in women. Discussion: The prevalence of obesity based on self-reported BMI can be estimated more accurately when using an algorithm adjusted for variables that are predictive for misreporting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2007. Vol. 15, no 1, 197-208 p.
Keyword [en]
self-reported, weight, height, validity
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-22153DOI: 10.1038/oby.2007.536ISI: 000249605500025Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33846887841OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-22153DiVA: diva2:621713
Available from: 2013-05-16 Created: 2013-05-16 Last updated: 2017-08-18Bibliographically approved

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