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Scaling of skeletal muscle shortening velocity in mammals representing a 100,000-fold difference in body size
Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States.
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Uppsala University Hospital, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9337-5113
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Uppsala University Hospital, 751 85, Uppsala, Sweden.
2006 (English)In: Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0031-6768, E-ISSN 1432-2013, Vol. 452, no 2, 222-230 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To fully understand the effect of scaling on skeletal muscle shortening velocity (V 0), it is important to know which phenotypic characteristics drive the changes between species. The purpose of the current investigation was to compare the effects of body mass and femur length, as an estimate of total limb length, on V 0 in species that cover a 100,000-fold range of body masses. Using the slack test procedure, V 0 was determined for fibers expressing types I and IIa myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms in the mouse, rat, dog, human, horse, and rhinoceros under identical experimental conditions. A significant scaling effect on V 0 was detected when compared to body mass (type I fibers, r=0.95, p<0.01; type IIa fibers, r=0.83, p<0.05). However, the horse's V 0 for both fiber types was faster than the human's, despite having a 5-fold greater body mass than the human. When V 0 was scaled vs limb length, the strength of the relationships improved in fibers expressing both types I and IIa MyHC (r=0.98, p<0.001, and r=0.89, p<0.05, respectively) and scaled with the expected relationship, with the species with the shorter femur, the horse, having the faster V 0. A similar effect can be seen with stride frequency scaling more closely with limb length than body mass. These results suggest that limb length, not body mass, is a more relevant factor driving the scaling effect on skeletal muscle shortening velocity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg: Springer, 2006. Vol. 452, no 2, 222-230 p.
Keyword [en]
scaling, shortening velocity, skeletal, muscle fiber
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-22072DOI: 10.1007/s00424-005-0017-6ISI: 000237887800011PubMedID: 16333661Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33745829431OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-22072DiVA: diva2:619993
Available from: 2013-05-07 Created: 2013-05-07 Last updated: 2017-08-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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