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Multiple Social Roles, Health, and Sickness Absence-A Five-Year Follow-Up Study of Professional Women in Sweden
Samhällsmedicin och Folkhälsa, Göteborgs Universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4773-1447
Samhällsmedicin och Folkhälsa, Göteborgs Universitet.
Samhällsmedicin och Folkhälsa, Göteborgs Universitet.
2012 (English)In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, Vol. 52, no 4, 336-351 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to analyze associations between changes in social roles and physical health, mental well-being, psychiatric disorder, and long-term sickness absence over a five-year period. The study was part of a general population-based multipurpose project. Professional women from six birth cohorts born in 1935, 1945, 1955, 1965, 1970, or 1975 (N = 532) were interviewed twice. Self-rated information on physical health, mental well-being, long-term sickness absence, and changes in social roles was used. Information on psychiatric disorders was based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-III-R and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV diagnoses. Multivariate logistic regressions were adjusted for age, socio-economic position, alcohol dependence and abuse, and health at baseline. An increase in number of social roles was associated with lower odds for poor mental well-being, odds ratio (OR) 0.4 (confidence interval [CI] 0.2 to 0.8), while a decrease was associated with higher odds for poor mental well-being, OR 4.5 (CI 1.8 to 11.0), psychiatric disorder, OR 2.6 (1.0 to 6.8), and sickness absence, OR 4.4 (1.6 to 11.7). The results indicated that an increase in number of social roles might be protective against poor mental well-being, while a decrease in number of roles might be related to increased psychiatric disorders and long-term sickness absence. More studies on long-term health implications of gender-specific experiences are needed. © 2012 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA: Taylor & Francis, 2012. Vol. 52, no 4, 336-351 p.
Keyword [en]
mental well-being, multiple roles, psychiatric disorder, self-rated health, sickness absence, Sweden, women
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-21062DOI: 10.1080/03630242.2012.667527ISI: 000304476100002PubMedID: 22591231Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84861497815OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-21062DiVA: diva2:587741
Available from: 2013-01-15 Created: 2013-01-15 Last updated: 2017-02-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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