hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Normalizing stance width
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Biomechanics and Biomedicine.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2513-3040
Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2012 (English)In: Neuroplasticity, Motor control, Cutting-Edge Technology & Rehabilitation: Proceedings of the XIXth Congress of the International Society of Electrophysiology & Kinesiology / [ed] Kylie Tucker, Bianca Butler and Paul W Hodges, Brisbane: NHMRC Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health , 2012, 221-221 p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: In previous studies, stance widths are most often determined as a percentage of shoulder width, where 70% of shoulder width is considered a narrow stance width and 140% of shoulder width is considered a wide stance width. A few studies have also normalized stance width to the width of the hips (distance between trochanters). However, there are also a possibility to normalize stance width in relation to the length of the lower extremities, since this variable might not change as much in dynamic situations and may correlate higher to the angle of the lower extremity in a frontal plane. AIM: This study aims to compare measurements of stance width when normalized to shoulder width, hip width and leg length for three different stance widths with feet attached to a board. METHOD: Motion capture (Qualisys, 16 Oqus-cameras) was used to measure 7 active male kitesurfers with their feet attached to a kiteboard (136 cm). They were 20-28 years old, in average 180 cm (SD=7 cm) and 78 kg (SD=7 kg). The subjects were standing with three different stance widths, using the same external rotation (20° bilaterally). Markers were attached to shoulders (acromion processes), knee joint lines, hips (trochanter major), heels (mid-posterior of calcaneus) and ankles (lateral and medial malleoli). Stance width was measured as the distance between the two medial ankle markers and normalized towards the distances between (1) the shoulder markers, (2) the hip markers and knee marker plus knee marker and lateral ankle marker and (3) the right and left hip marker. Furthermore, the angle of an extended lower extremity towards a vertical line in the frontal plane was measured. All measurements were done twice, and SPSS 20 was used for data analysis of correlation (Pearson’s r). RESULTS: The measured stance widths between ankles were 39.9 cm, 43.6 cm, and 48 cm (SD=1.2-1.4) for all subjects. The correlations (r) between the angle of the leg towards a vertical line and normalized stance width for the three normalization variables were: (1) 0.79, (2) 0.96 and (3) 0.93. All of the correlations were significant at a level of p>0.01. CONCLUSION: The results show that the variables hip or leg length would be preferred to use when normalizing stance width for young male athletes, standing in wide stance widths. Further studies using a greater number of subjects, more stance widths and a more heterogeneous group are suggested for the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brisbane: NHMRC Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health , 2012. 221-221 p.
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-19726ISBN: 978-0-646-58228-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-19726DiVA: diva2:556307
Conference
ISEK 2012: XIXth Congress of the International Society of Electrophysiology & Kinesiology, 19-21 July 2012, Brisbane, Australia
Available from: 2012-09-25 Created: 2012-09-25 Last updated: 2017-04-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lundgren, LinaOsvalder, Anna-LisaBrorsson, Sofia
By organisation
Biomechanics and BiomedicineBiological and Environmental Systems (BLESS)
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 213 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf