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The association between socio-economic status and chest pain, focusing on self-rated health in a primary health care area of Sweden
Primary Health Care Research and Development Unit, Halland County Council, Falkenberg, Sweden.
Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI).
2001 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 11, no 4, 420-424 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study objective: The study objective was to determine, first, the association between men's and women's chest pain and their socio-economic status (occupation, smoking) and, secondly, the association between their socio-economic status and self-rated health, in a primary health care area. Design and setting: A population-based cross-sectional survey was made in a primary health care area of Sweden. Primarily based on occupation according to Swedish standards, 4,238 men and women were divided into two socio-economic groups; blue-collar and white-collar workers. Methods: Odds ratios with 95% Cl were calculated by multivariate logistic regression, controlling for the variable age as confounding factor. Student's t-test was used to compare self-rated health, and the chi (2)-test to determine any difference in smoking habits between the two groups. Main results: Both male and female blue-collar workers showed significantly more chest pain when excited than white-collar workers. In six of eight health indices, they also reported significantly worse self-rated health than the white-collar workers. Conclusions: These findings show that there are socio-economic inequalities in self-reported chest pain. Furthermore, socio-economic status has a major influence on self-rated health, acting across the working life of both sexes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. Vol. 11, no 4, 420-424 p.
Keyword [en]
chest pain, IHD, self-rated health, sex, socio-economic
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-18762DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/11.4.420ISI: 000172803900012PubMedID: 11766484Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0035198142OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-18762DiVA: diva2:540457
Available from: 2012-07-10 Created: 2012-06-25 Last updated: 2013-01-15Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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