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Impact of wind turbine sound on annoyance, self-reported sleep disturbance and psychological distress
Department of Applied Research in Care, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS).
GGD Amsterdam Public Health Service, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Department of Community & Occupational Health, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
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2012 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 425, 42-51 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose of the research: The present government in the Netherlands intends to realize a substantial growth ofwind energy before 2020, both onshore and offshore. Wind turbines, when positioned in the neighborhood ofresidents may cause visual annoyance and noise annoyance. Studies on other environmental sound sources,such as railway, road traffic, industry and aircraft noise show that (long-term) exposure to sound can havenegative effects other than annoyance from noise. This study aims to elucidate the relation between exposureto the sound of wind turbines and annoyance, self-reported sleep disturbance and psychological distress ofpeople that live in their vicinity. Data were gathered by questionnaire that was sent by mail to a representativesample of residents of the Netherlands living in the vicinity of wind turbinesPrincipal results: A dose–response relationship was found between immission levels of wind turbine soundand selfreported noise annoyance. Sound exposure was also related to sleep disturbance and psychologicaldistress among those who reported that they could hear the sound, however not directly but with noiseannoyance acting as a mediator. Respondents living in areas with other background sounds were less affectedthan respondents in quiet areas.Major conclusions: People living in the vicinity of wind turbines are at risk of being annoyed by the noise, anadverse effect in itself. Noise annoyance in turn could lead to sleep disturbance and psychological distress. Nodirect effects of wind turbine noise on sleep disturbance or psychological stress has been demonstrated,which means that residents, who do not hear the sound, or do not feel disturbed, are not adversely affected.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2012. Vol. 425, 42-51 p.
Keyword [en]
Wind turbine sound, Annoyance, Sleep disturbance, Psychological distress, Structural equation modeling
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-17592DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.03.005ISI: 000304214200006PubMedID: 22481052Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84860011051OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-17592DiVA: diva2:524766
Available from: 2012-05-03 Created: 2012-05-03 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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