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Digital Media as Classified and Classifying: The Case of Young Men in Sweden
Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Center for Social Analysis (CESAM), Centre for Studies of Political Science, Communication and Media (CPKM), Media and Communication Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3070-4717
2011 (English)In: Platform: Journal of Media and Communication, ISSN 1836-5132, 57-71 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Digital media are widely talked about as a democratising force. As internet access proliferates, it is implied, structural constraints will dissolve and bring greater equality - if not instantly, but gradually as today's youth, the digital generation, come of age and agents of the old, non-digital order pass away. Thus, the alleged boundlessness of digital media is thought of as somehow having unbound young people from the larger social structure of power relations. Drawing on the ideas of Pierre Bourdieu, the present article examines the significance of social class for the ways in which young Swedish men perceive, interpret and make use of digital media in their everyday lives. The results suggest that class, through the workings of habitus, shapes the young men's approaches to education, leisure and the future, which, in turn, tend to generate divergent readings of digital media. Those who are privileged in terms of cultural and economic capital think and make use of digital media in compliance with the perceived moral order of digital goods and practices as instituted and imposed by the educational system, for example, whereas those disprivileged in this respect, although recognising the dominant scheme of classification and valuation of such goods and practices, tend to use them in ways that are at odds with it, thereby contributing to the workings of symbolic violence, i.e. to their own subordination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Melbourne, Australia: University of Melbourne , 2011. 57-71 p.
Keyword [en]
Digital media, Consumption, Morality, Young people, Social Class, Habitus
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-16617OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-16617DiVA: diva2:461040
Note

Special Issue: Young Scholars’ Network of ECREA - November 2011

Available from: 2011-12-01 Created: 2011-12-01 Last updated: 2016-03-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1177 kB)187 downloads
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File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1177 kBChecksum SHA-512
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Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

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http://journals.culture-communication.unimelb.edu.au/platform/yecrea_2011_danielsson.html

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf