hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The birthroom in Greenland
Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS), Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI). (Gruppen för forskning om hälsofrämjande processer)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1235-620X
2011 (English)In: 14th International Medical Geography Symposium (IMGS): Programme and Abstracts, Durham: Durham University , 2011, 217-217 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A largely roadless country with barely 60.000 inhabitants in more or less rural environments and adverse climate, Greenland poses extreme challenges for childbirth and midwifery. Greenland possesses a modern hospital structure, but the training of midwives and physicians takes place in Denmark. Thus, like many other countries on the periphery, Greenland remains locked in a technological development with competence permanently transferred from the West instead of based of local needs. In an ethnographic study, following midwifery practice, it is described how this affects child delivery care and the localization of childbirth. Perinatal mortality and infant mortality in Greenland has long exceeded the rates in Denmark. Therefore, high security in obstetric care is considered essential. Greenland women do not give birth at home but in hospitals. These hospitals, however, are rather like primary care centres. For many years these hospitals have been staffed with Western surgeons and physicians spending a few months in Greenland. Normal deliveries were assisted by so called birth assistants, with shorter domestic training in general health care. In-depth interviews with the midwives revealed the pregnant women come from small villages and feel frightened by being far from their families. Due to the adverse topographic and climatic conditions the women have to stay in the hospital or with relatives in the capital 3 – 4 weeks before the expected delivery. The study shows that the combination of geographical factors and the dependency on foreign staff affects the structure of care as well as the women’s experience of giving birth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Durham: Durham University , 2011. 217-217 p.
Keyword [en]
birth, midwifes, healthcare, place, foregin staff
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-16205OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-16205DiVA: diva2:440428
Conference
14th International Medical Geography Symposium (IMGS), Department of Geography, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom, 10 – 15 July 2011
Available from: 2011-09-12 Created: 2011-09-12 Last updated: 2015-08-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Rämgård, Margareta
By organisation
Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI)
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 54 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf