hh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Grip assistive devices studied in women with reumatic diseases
Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Biomechanics and Biomedicine.
Section for Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, The Sahlgrenska Academy University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
2011 (English)In: Abstracts EULAR 2011 London, United Kingdom, 25-28 May 2011, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background:

Previous studies have shown that persons with reumatoid disease use assistive devices to manage activites of daily living and that loss of grip force and high factors of pain are the main indicator for the use of assitive devices. Furthermore, these studies have pointed out that activities as open and handle bottles, cans are hard items to performe.

Objectives:

This pilot project aimed to evaluate grip assistive devices adapted for people with reduced hand function as grip force and pain also disabilities as difficulties in some daily activities. Furthermore, the project aims to evaluate the participants' reflections and advice about the manageability of the products.

Methods:

The test group consisted of 14 female patients (mean age 60 years) with rheumatoid diseases (Rheumatoid arthritis (7), Osteoarthritis (5), Fibromyalgia (1), Psoriasis arthritis (1)). Eight different grip assistive devices, developed for opening and handle cans, bottles and canned food, were evaluated. The grip assistive devices was evaluated using a rated scale from 0-10 (0= not useful, 10=very useful) and the cut-off for classification as useful were at least five points.

Hand activities were evaluated with the Grip Ability Test (GAT) and the questionnaire Quick DASH (Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand). The hand function as pain was marked using visual analogue scale (VAS) and grip force was measured using the electronic grip force device Grippit®.

Results:

The hand test, GAT, was 34.2 ± 12.0 points and the Quick DASH was 45.5 ± 18.1, VAS was 3.8 ± 3.0 and mean grip force was 76.1 ± 37.2 Newton. The grip force was correlated to pain (r= - 0.581, p=0.029) and also to DASH (r=-0.641, p=0.014). Furthermore there was a correlation between DASH and VAS (r=0.748, p=0.002). There was no correlation between GAT and Grip force, DASH or VAS. Concerning the grip assistive devices five of the eight devices were rated over six points and perceived as functional and useful for open bottles and cans. There was a significant correlation between grip force and the grip device (r=0.557, p=0.039) most useful for the patients and a tendency for correlation between grip force and the other four grip assistive devices that the patients has rated as useful.

Conclusions:

This pilot study shows that grip force is one important factor for patients when it comes to chose grip assistive devices. Furthermore, it is individual what grip assistive devices that will be chosen to perform a specific activity. Therefore it is important to measure both hand function and hand activities to maintain good possibilities to perform an active life style with reduced pain and increased grip force in patients with rheumatic diseases.

References:

  1. Dellhag, B. and A. Bjelle (1995). "A Grip Ability Test for use in rheumatology practice." J Rheumatol 22 (8):1559-65
  2. Gummesson, C., M. M. Ward, et al. (2006). "The shortened disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire (QuickDASH): validity and reliability based on responses within the full-length DASH." BMC Musculoskelet Disord 7: 44.
  3. Nordenskiold, U (1997). “ Daily activities in women with rheumatoid arthritis. Aspects of patients education, assistive devices and methods for disability and impairment assessment.” Scand J Rehabil Med Suppl 37:1-72.
  4. (2003). “Rheumatoid arthritis: hand function, activities of daily living, grip strength and essential assistive devices.” Curationis 26 (3):98-106.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-15322OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-15322DiVA, id: diva2:421961
Conference
Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, EULAR 2011, London, United Kingdom, 25-28 May, 2011
Note

Abstract ID: SAT0502-HP

Ann Rheum Dis 2011;70(Suppl3):763

Available from: 2011-06-10 Created: 2011-06-10 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

http://www.abstracts2view.com/eular/view.php?nu=EULAR11L_SAT0502-HP

Authority records BETA

Brorsson, Sofia

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Brorsson, Sofia
By organisation
Biomechanics and Biomedicine
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 277 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf