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Five Weeks of Plyometric Training Improve Vertical Jump Height in Female Handball Players During In-Season
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS). (Exercise Physiology, Biomechanics and Health)
Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Biological and Environmental Systems (BLESS), Biomechanics and Biomedicine. (Exercise Physiology, Biomechanics and Health)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9337-5113
2010 (English)In: Nordic Conference 2010: Abstracts / [ed] Karen Søgaard, Karsten Froberg & Mette Krogh Christensen, Odense: University of Southern Denmark , 2010, 112-113 p.Conference paper, Poster (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Handball is a sport requiring many different physical qualities in order to perform well, one of which is good jumping ability. For handball players available time to enhance power during in-season is often restricted due to an already high training load emphasizing other aspects of the sport than jumping ability. Therefore, one aim of this study was to examine if a small amount of additional plyometric training during in-season, combining drop jumps and box jumps, could give significant improvements in vertical jump height in female handball players after five weeks of training. Generally, vertical jump height is evaluated with two-legged tests, however, the question arises if the tests are relevant in sports that predominantly use several steps and one-leg jumps such as handball. A second aim of this study was thus to develop, evaluate and validate a handball-specific test performed on one leg.

Methods: Two Swedish female handball-teams playing in the third division were recruited. Players from one team made up the intervention-group (n = 9) and players from the other team functioned as the control-group (n = 4). Plyometric training was added to the regular handball training session twice per week during five weeks, lasting approximately 15 minutes per session, consisting of two sets of eight repetitions of drop jumps and box jumps respectively, while the control-group continued their training as normal. Jumping performance was evaluated through the squat jump test (SJ), countermovement jump test (CMJ) and the handball-specific one leg jump test (OLJ) developed for this study in order to offer a more sport-specific evaluation tool when testing sports that predominantely jump on one leg.

Results: The intervention-group improved their jumping height significantly with 2,7 cm in the SJ, 3,6cm in the CMJ and 3,6 cm in the OLJ (p < 0,01 for all). The control-group had an opposite trend with diminishing results in all three jumps, -1,5 cm in the SJ (p < 0,05), -1,7 cm in the CMJ (p < 0,05) and -0,9 cm in the OLJ (not significant). The one-legged jump test (OLJ) correlated well with both SJ (r= 0,79, p <0,01 ), and CMJ (r=0,75, p < 0,01).

Discussion: The present study found significant improvements in jumping height after only five weeks of plyometric training for female handball players. Interestingly, the intervention-group improved to the same extent in both the one and the two-leg jumps test, which might be explained by the accumulation of handball specific training drills performed on one-leg, together with the two-legged plyometric exercises. The same assumption could also explain why the control-group showed no change in the one-leg jump test between the pre and post-tests, but displayed significant lower scores in the two-legged jumping tests after 5 weeks with only regular handball training.

Conclusion: The improvements seen in this study with a small amount of additional plyometric training is relevant for coaches that need to provide gains in jumping performance during in-season when there is not a lot of time for additional training. Moreover, an evaluation test needs to be as specific as possible to the performance in the sport. The one-leg vertical jump test, developed in this study, could be a first step to a future handball-test that better resembles the jumping performance in handball than already established two-leg jumping tests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Odense: University of Southern Denmark , 2010. 112-113 p.
Keyword [en]
Handball, plyometric training, jumps, female
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-14184OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-14184DiVA: diva2:390787
Conference
Nordic Conference 2010 (NorCon 2010), Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Health, Participation and Effects of Sport and Exercise, 28th – 30th oct 2010, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
Funder
Magnus Bergvall Foundation
Note

Support provided by PRODEA Health Group and Magnus Bergvalls Stiftelse

Available from: 2011-01-24 Created: 2011-01-24 Last updated: 2017-08-18Bibliographically approved

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