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Talking Heads: The Use of Phrenology and Physiognomy in Jane Eyre
Halmstad University, School of Humanities (HUM).
2005 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
Abstract [en]
A plain heroine is nothing to wish for in a Victorian novel.This study, however, shows how Charlotte Brontë succeeds in making a plain looking heroine interesting to the reader. In the Victorian period the use of phrenology and physiognomy was widespread. In Jane Eyre Charlotte Brontë cleverly uses phrenology and physiognomy to unravel the complexity of her characters. The shape of a person's skull becomes more than bumps on the head, an ugly man is no longer ugly and a plain heroine turns out to be not at all plain.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005.
Keyword [en]
Jane Eyre, phrenology, physiognomy, characterisation
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hh:diva-13359Local ID: U12482OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hh-13359DiVA: diva2:368543
Uppsok
Humanities, Theology
Note
Denna uppsats kan beställas från arkivet / This paper can be ordered from the archive. Kontakta / Contact: arkivet@hh.seAvailable from: 2010-11-09 Created: 2010-11-09Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
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